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African art items:


The achievements of African tribal art fascinated many European artists and collectors in the 20th century. From André Breton to Picasso, all were seized with a buying fever that quickly spread in the middle. If these sculptures are more of an artistic dimension for Westerners, it is nevertheless through their ritual sacralisation that they reveal themselves for the African peoples. Their ceremonial role confers on them a unique power that distinguishes them from other forms of ethnic art. These works were acquired (sold or offered by natives) throughout the twentieth century by ethnologists on mission or colonial cooperatives to be exhibited in museums, or integrated into prestigious private collections. This is the story of these pieces that we propose to discover through our gallery and our website.

Fetish statuette Ewe Venovi
objet vendu
African art > African fetish > Ewe Fetish

A Togolese version of the Ibedji fetish statuettes of Nigeria's Yoruba, the fetish carved according to traditional conventions is simply swaddled in animal skin now amulets in the form of hooked metal elements. Fertility-symbolizing cauris accessorize the room. The object was ritually coated with indigo and white clay forming a thick granular film. The Ewe consider the birth of twins called Venavi (or Venovi) as a happy omen. They must be treated equally and fairly. For example, both will be fed and washed at the same time and will wear the same clothes until puberty. If one of the twins dies, the parents obtain a statuette to replace the deceased child and turn to a fetishist to activate its magical virtues.
She will be of the same sex as the child she represents and replaces but ...

Gbékré sé Baule oracle box
African art > African Jar > Baoulé box

Aimed at a practice still in use today in the Baoulé region of the south-west, the sculpture consists of a mediating tutelary figure, visibly in meditation, depicted in a sitting position against a circular receptacle. A vegetable fiber cord, forming a transport handle, encloses the lid. The object is engraved with parallel lines and checkerboards, the receptacle has in its lower part a circular frieze open. Heads representing mouse heads appear on the walls. A mouse, considered a messenger of the earth's deities, lived in the lower compartment of the object (mouse now absent...) and the successive arrangement of the elements it moved was read as an answer to the question posed to the soothsayer. The metal plate, under the box, was fitted and punctured so that the mice were in contact ...


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250.00

Kasai Shoowa Velvet
African art > African Textile > Textile Cuba

Ex-collection Belgian tribal art.
African art and the refinement of Kuba weaving Produced in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, Kuba subgroup, these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a raffia textile base on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the technique of velvet weaving to the Kuba country in the 17th century. ...


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120.00

Fertility figure Mossi
objet vendu
African art > African Statues > MossI Statues

Upper Volta, Burkina Faso since independence, is made up of descendants of the invaders, horsemen from Ghana in the 15th century, named Nakomse , and Tengabibisi , descendants of the natives. Political power is in the hands of the Nakomsé, who assert their power through the statues, while priests and religious leaders come from the Tengabisi, who use masks during their ceremonies. Animists, the Mossi venerate a creative god named Wendé . Each individual would be endowed with a soul, sigha , linked to a totem icne. A female figure whose base would have been eaten up by insects, she has, figuratively by lines made up of small holes, Mossi ethnic scarifications. The statuette is dressed only in a pearl necklace and a belt string. It has small hands very finely digitized The softness of its ...


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Small holo zoomorphic mask
African art > African mask > Holo Mask

This mask is capped with a tiara consisting alternately of braided vegetable fibers, laces, necklaces of pink pearls arranged horizontally, rattan pad and animal skin. The almond-eyed face, incised, extends with a bifid beak. The surface of the wood, abraded, reveals an underlying light wood.
Total height with base: 35 cm. Located in the Democratic Congo between the Yaka and the Tchokwé of Angola, the small Holo ethnic group migrated from the Angolan coast to settle near the banks of the Kwango River. Hunting and agriculture provide for their livelihood. Neighbouring ethnic groups, such as the Suku and Yaka, influenced their traditional sculptures. The Holos have produced hexagonal masks and prestige objects for the ruling elite. The Holos used sculptures, asexual anthropomorphic ...


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280.00

Baoule Ndoma Mask
objet vendu
African art > African mask > Baule Mask

The soft harmony of the ovoid face, in which the mouth forms a barely prognath volume, is highlighted by a high headdress. The latter is divided into several braided shells forming a tiara. This piece of tribal art features an oiled reddish-brown patina, locally abraded. Reddish pigments and kaolin inlays appear. These portrait masks of the Baoulé, ndoma , which are part of one of the oldest Baoulé artistic traditions and frequently represent an idealized character, have the peculiarity of manifesting itself at the end of the dance ceremonies of entertainment. The latter are named, depending on the regions, bedwo, ngblo, mblo, adjussu, etc. Each of these masks are distinguished by the hairstyles, the location and the choice of scarifications, etc. Also called Gbagba , they personify ...


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Ancestor figure Hemba Singiti
African art > African Statues > Statuette hemba

This small protective figure Hemba, whose characteristics were once attributed to the Luba, embodies an ancestor. Created in order to communicate with the guardian spirits, this sculpture was part of the U-002mvidye", intermediaries between the spiritual world and individuals, which can also embody the spirits of nature in the Luba of Kasai.The leaders of Hemba clan had several statues of ancestors that they worshipped and to which they dedicated offerings in order to astound their legitimacy. This character adopts the classical position, hands valuing a protruding abdomen, symbol of lineage. It also features the sophisticated headdress, hollowed out in the shape of a cross. Dark brown part whose protrusions are abraded by use. Satin surface.
The Luba (Baluba in Chiluba) are a ...


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125.00

Statuette Mumuye
African art > African Statues > Statuette Mumuye

The group of about 100,000 Mumuye live, mainly from agriculture, in the north-eastern region of Nigeria, which is limited by the Benoué loop and the Cameroonian border. As the area was difficult to access, they remained relatively isolated until 1950. Their statuary was discovered around 1968. The Mumuye of Nigeria, like the Tiv, are organized into initiation societies staggered into age classes that take place for young boys in a box, tsafi, in which the statues are stored. They reinforce the prestige of their holder, but also participate in healing rituals, divination and ordalies.
This figure features zigzag stretched upper limbs plated against the bust, hands resting on the lower abdomen, legs half bent spaced in the pelvis extension. These traits are generally found in statuary ...


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150.00

Hemba ancestor head
African art > African Statues > Hemba Head

This cephalomorphic sculpture presents the features of the Hemba statuary, half-closed eyes in an ovoid face, frontal tiara composed of alternating bars, sophisticated cruciform headdress. The face has delicately sculpted features highlighted by a raised pattern featuring a thin beard collar. Usually made in iroko, these objects were revered by a particular clan and stored in burial facilities in the chief's house.
Mate dark brown patina. Abrasions, Slit on the nose.
The Hemba have long been subject to the neighbouring Luba empire which has had a definite influence on their culture, religion and art. The cult of ancestors is central to Hemba society. Genealogy is indeed the guarantor of privileges and the distribution of land. All aspects of the community are imbued with the ...


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370.00

Statuette Binji
African art > African Statues > Statuette Binji

The Binji , Babinji (not to be confused with the Mbagani) form, among the Bembe and Buyu , scattered groups from the branch Bushoong of Kuba, which give considerable prestige to the art of hunting. Since the Tschokwe introduced the use of tobacco and hemp, they carved particularly refined pipes. Their less renowned masks, and their everyday objects, are imbued with the characteristics of Kuba art.This Binji statuette is depicted wearing the large hema mask tshibangabanga , reserved for the leader of the initiation camp. The insiders danced with fibre masks.
This mask tshibangabanga with a wide visor front had a summit appendage to add feathers. A buzzed nose separates rectangular eyes whose sinking confers a menacing appearance. The figure was dressed in a woven raffia vest and a ...


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390.00

Masque Anang, Ibibio
objet vendu
African art > African mask > New product

This mask of the Anang, from the Group Ibibio, embodying a beautiful young woman, was dedicated to the entertainment parties of the company Ekpo. The hairstyle, which develops into braids and side shells, enhances the hollowed-out look of heavy eyelids. Under the frontal scarification in lozenge, distinctive of the group, the nasal appendage marked by a rounded end is born. The carefully carved mouth reveals the teeth. The surface has a cracked pink ochre patina.
The Ibibios are a people of West Africa, mainly present in southeastern Nigeria (Akwa Ibom State), but also in Ghana, Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea. Secret societies are numerous among the Ibibio set up west of the Cross River. Without centralized government, their social organization is comparable to that of neighbouring ...


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Yaka talisman necklace
objet vendu
African art > Jewels > Yaka necklace

This necklace of dried seeds, tubular beads, and a talisman from which two carefully carved heads appear, is a lineage charm that protects against enemies. It was carried out according to the instructions of the Nganga ngoombu and the sponsor of the object. Hierarchical and authoritarian, composed of fearsome warriors, Yaka society was ruled by lineage leaders with the right to life and death over their subjects. Hunting and the prestige that comes with it are an opportunity today for the Yaka to summon ancestors and resort to rituals with the help of charms. The initiation society of young people is the n-khanda , which is found in the Eastern Kongo (Chokwe, Luba, etc...),and which uses various charms and masks in order to ensure a vigorous lineage. Ethnic artistic productions have been ...


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Large statue Baoulé Aboya / Mbotumbo
African art > African Statues > Baoule figure

This sculpture of a cynocephalic monkey, exceptional in size, with a cross-section of the hands, has half-flexed intertwined lower limbs. In an attitude of supplication, it also has a belt made of vegetable fibers with a second round cut for offerings. Often linked to the cult Mbra of divination and possession, they belong to the group of "êtres-force" or amwin , intermediaries between God and men and given to the Baoulé by their Creator, as well as the sacred masks whose wide gaping jaw they share. It would also be a minor deity named barked . For propitiatory purposes, these sculptures were to constitute the interior of the spirits to which offerings were presented and on which libations were practiced. Real monkey skulls frequently formed the character's head. The sculptures were kept ...


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Faire offre

1500.00

Statuette Songye
African art > African Statues > Songye Fetish

The traditional fetishes in African Songye art.This Songye sculpture is a magical statue named Nkisi , nkishi (pl. mankishi). This protective fetish of the Songye, tribal sculpture with a protective vocation, has a stylized face reminiscent of the features of the Kifwebe mask. The large digitized hands highlight the abdominal prominence, a witness to lineage. It is accessorized with raffia bracelets and an animal skin skirt. The magic charge, absent, was attached to the top of the skull by a nail.
Dark brown velvety patina.
These home protection fetishes are among the most prized in Africa. The Songye considered them dangerous to handle, which is why they were moved with rods inserted under their arms. Nkishi plays the role of mediator between gods and humans in the African ...


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240.00

Songye Kifwebe Mask
objet vendu
African art > African mask > Songye Mask

This item of songye African mask, the kikashi, features hollowed-out palpebral slits, stretched towards the temples and a flat naso-frontal crest, in the form of a rib on which some blackish pigments remain. The protruding mouth was raised with a red light. Parallel furrows, encrusted with white kaolin, adorn the surface of the wood, symbolizing plumage and the link with death. Areas of abrasion and a break on the back of the mask are noteworthy. The patina is dry and velvety. Three variants of this mask Kifwebe (pl. Bifwebe) or "Chasing the mort" (Roberts) stand out: the masculine (kilume) usually with a high crest, the feminine (kikashi) with a very low crest see absent, and finally the largest embodying the (kia ndoshi). This type of mask, still used today, appears to originate from ...


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Songye Kikashi Mask
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African art > African mask > Songye Mask

This copy of Songye African mask, the kikashi , has eyelids stretched towards the temples and a reduced naso-frontal crest. The tubular mouth has an opening. Parallel streaks alternately found with black, red and white pigments adorn the surface of the wood, symbolizing plumage and the link with death.
Mate patina abraded.
Three variants of this mask Kifwebe (pl. Bifwebe) or "Chasing the mort" (Roberts) stand out: the masculine (kilume) usually with a high crest, the feminine (kikashi) with a very low crest see absent, and finally the largest embodying the (kia ndoshi). This type of mask, still used today, appears to originate from the adjacent area between the northern Luba and the Southeastern Songye. They are worn with a long suit and a long beard made of natural fibers, ...


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Songye Nkishi Fetish
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African art > African fetish > Statue Songye

The traditional fetishes in the African art of the Songye.
This metal-plated Songye sculpture, sacralized by the nganga , is awe-down with many magical and symbolic elements, such as metal bells and balls, shells and pearls, ropes, leather bags, raffia loincloth, feathers, mammalian skins. Tribal statue named Nkisi , nkishi (pl. mankishi ), it forms a protective fetish of the Songye. Its blue tubular pearl necklaces are associated with the seven-year cycle of the initiation association of bukishi . A horn, in which magical elements ( bajimba) were introduced, rises from its skull. The large digitized hands highlight the abdominal prominence marked by a metal capsule, witness to the lineage. The appearance of the fetish has been enhanced, with its head facing side, thanks to a ...


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Kete Kuba Nyita Mask, Ngita
African art > African mask > Masque Cuba

Songye, Kete and Kuba influences mingle on this African hem mask associated with funeral rites. The horns refer to the braids that the notables wore in some tribes of Zaire, including the Kuba. The projection mouth, the oblique parallel stripes, the metal applications, are part of the peculiarities of the Songye Kifwebe masks ("boismasks"). A graphic made up of contrasting geometric patterns, combined with a mnemonic coded system, adorns the surface of the mask. Localized abrasions and dessication cracks are apparent. Restorations on the horns. The Kete, established between the Luba and Songye, mingled with the Kuba and Tschokwe and derive their livelihood from hunting, net fishing, and agriculture. Their matrilineal society worships nature spirits named mungitchi. Believing in ...


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390.00

Masque Pwo des Chokwe
African art > African mask > Tchokwe Mask


The engravings inscribed on The Tchokwe African masks also served as public markers of ethnic identity. The recurrent cruciform frontal pattern would also have a cosmogonic meaning. The protruding cheekbones highlighted in parallel motifs represent here the tears of the mothers following the initiation ceremonies of passage to the adult state, marking the end of the privileged bond between the child and his mother. These stylized tears sublimate the resulting mixture of pride and sadness.
The Chokwe Pwo masks of eastern Angola, southern Democratic Republic of Congo and northern Zambia, form idealized female representations for the worship of female ancestors. Indeed, the company Chokwe is organized in a matrilineal way. Joined by their male counterparts, Cihongo recognisable ...


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350.00

Vouvi / Tsogho reliquary statue
objet vendu
African art > African Statues > Statue Mitsogho

Ex-French African art collection.
African masks and statues from groups neighbouring groups Punu, Shira and Lumbo, Vuvi, Galoa and Mitsogho , are also coated with white pigments for apotropaic purposes. This Tsogho statue, or Mitsogho, polychrome, is dressed in a raffia loincloth, part of which encircles one of the wrists. It also has a necklace holding metal amulets. Offering a triangular nose highlighted by the bulging cheeks, the face is marked with a black losangic stripe on the forehead, the one crossing the chin suggesting the beard worn by the Vuvi dignitaries. The look formed of stretched eyelids is a beauty criterion called mighembe . The back is incised with a deep groove forming reliquary. Kaolin crusty patina, charcoal and red ochre tops. One of the feet is eroded. The ...

Ogoni mobile jaw mask
African art > African mask > Ogoni Mask

The Ogoni live along the coast of Nigeria, near the mouth of the Cross-River, south of the Igbo and west of the Ibibio. Their sculptures vary from village to village, but are mainly renowned for their articulated macho masks such as some Ekpo Ibibio masks. Their masks were usually worn at funerals, festivities accompanying plantations and crops, but also more recently to welcome distinguished guests. The acrobatic events related to the celebration karikpo, and accompanied by the kere karikpo drum, were also an opportunity to exhibit various zoomorphic masks. This Ogboni mask, which would embody an ancestor or a high-ranking character, has a hairstyle consisting of three large braids.
Peeled crusty patina. Splend under the chin. Height of 49 cm on pedestal.


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290.00





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