...
Search option




Discover our exceptionnal items

African art items:


The achievements of African tribal art fascinated many European artists and collectors in the 20th century. From André Breton to Picasso, all were seized with a buying fever that quickly spread in the middle. If these sculptures are more of an artistic dimension for Westerners, it is nevertheless through their ritual sacralisation that they reveal themselves for the African peoples. Their ceremonial role confers on them a unique power that distinguishes them from other forms of ethnic art. These works were acquired (sold or offered by natives) throughout the twentieth century by ethnologists on mission or colonial cooperatives to be exhibited in museums, or integrated into prestigious private collections. This is the story of these pieces that we propose to discover through our gallery and our website.

Senoufo Stool
African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Senoufo Stool

Ex-collection African art from Belgium.
Among the African furniture items of daily use is an ancient senoufo seat from the Ivory Coast, with a low, rectangular seat supported by massive legs. This type of stool for individual use, often carved from shea wood, marked the social rank of its owner and was not lent under any circumstances. Beautiful light patina velvety with use. Mainly farmers, the Senoufo group lives in a savannah region that covers the south of Mali and Burkina Faso, and the north of Côte d'Ivoire. It includes about fifty sub-ethnic groups. The Senufo speak a Voltaic language, Gur, like the Lobi and Koulango. Councils of elders, headed by an elected chief, administer Senufo villages. Governed by matrilineal traditions, they are composed of clusters of ...


View details

150.00

Tadep Mambila statue
Sold item
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Mambila statue

As if mastering a powerful internal energy, the shoulders and arms of this statue are concentrated around a small bust widening towards the abdomen. The legs end in thick feet, digitized towards the center. Huge oncave orbits underlined by tenons occupy most of the face. At the top, a crusty prominence, an aggregate of ritual elements. Thick matte patina cracked, highlights of kaolin and red ochre. Despite their small numbers, the thirty thousand Mambila (or Mambilla, Mambere, Nor, Torbi, Lagubi, Tagbo, Tongbo, Bang, Ble, Juli, Bea)(the "men", in Fulani), settled in the northwest of Cameroon, have created a large number of masks and statues easily identifiable by their heart-shaped faces. Although the Mambila believe in a creator god named Chang or Nama, they worship only their ...


View details

Sold

Mambila Tadep Statue
Sold item
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Mambila Statue

Made according to recurring canons, these statues supposedly embodying the ancestors often have small studs on their heads as a headdress, like this slightly off-center sculpture. It depicts a corpulent figure, whose head is encased in broad rounded shoulders.
The hands meet under the face which seems to be extended by a beard, while the hallucinated look could suggest trance. The massive crenellated legs reproduce the angular volume of the abdomen.
Crusty ochre matte patina, locally scaled. Cracks.


Despite their small numbers, the thirty thousand Mambila (or Mambilla, Mambere, Nor, Torbi, Lagubi, Tagbo, Tongbo, Bang, Ble, Juli, Bea)(the "men," in Fulani), settled in northwestern Cameroon, created a large number of masks and statues easily identifiable by ...


View details

Sold

Sundi Ndunga / Yombe mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Sundi mask

The African masks naturalistic of the Kongo clans.

According to the sources, these masks would belong to the diviners, to the Ndunga society, or were worn during funeral rites.
This naturalistic face, framed by ears, is distinguished by its mouth revealing two single teeth, its flattened nose and narrow slits for the eyes. He is also wearing a skullcap. Soft wood, abraded matte patina.
The Vili , the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, headed by the king ntotela . Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory and copper trade and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary with a codified gesture related to their worldview. In ...


View details

340.00

Dan Wakemia figurative spoon
African art > Spoons, ladles > Dan spoon

Usual objects in African art.
The sculpted handle here represents legs with powerful muscles. They are frozen in a dynamic posture evoking a dance movement. Black brown patina and kaolin. The tribal art of the Dan also produces objects of daily use, including these carved wooden utensils, Wakemia, used during festive ceremonies, and granted by the villagers to the women leading the traditional women's associations. These shovels, symbols of prestige, will be joyfully brandished during the "dances of the hospitable woman" (wakede) of the great meals organized under their authority. For the Dan of Côte d'Ivoire, also called Yacouba, two distinct universes are opposed: that of the village, composed of its inhabitants and its animals, and that of the forest, its vegetation ...


View details

280.00

Mangbetu terracotta vase
Sold item
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Jarre Mangbetu

A globular body surmounted by a female head styled according to the barrels of the ethnic group affirms the elegance of mangbetu pottery, symbol of fertility. The motifs engraved on the surface echo the traditional scarifications. The work of ceramics, in West and Central Africa, is carried out by women, wives of blacksmiths in the majority of cases. The Mangbetu women, who also produced basketry, excelled in this art.
In the forest in northeastern Zaire, the Mangbetu kingdom has expressed itself through architectural works that impressed European visitors in the 19th century. Their furniture, weapons, adornments and statuary were imbued with a rare aesthetic quality. The Mangbetu story was based on the refinement of his court but also on cannibalistic customs. King Mangbetu Munza ...


View details


Sold for 140.00 Find similar item

Jarre Boa/Mangbetu
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Boa container

Vase with a neck showing a human head with large ears. Sets of incised motifs decorate the sides, which show female attributes. Brown slip with reddish glints. Abrasions. Related to the Mangbetu and Zande, the Boa inhabit the savannah in the north of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Their anthropomorphic figures were undoubtedly used as part of rites charged with combating the witchcraft of the ndoki society. They are known for their mask with oversized ears, perforated like the ear pavilions of the Eastern Boa, the "bavobongo ". It gave an impressive appearance to its wearer, accentuated by the contrast of colors. The African art mask kpongadomba of the Boa was ordered by the chief kumu who offered it to the most valiant warrior. It was then kept in the hut of his wife. Some ...


View details

140.00

Pende Mingangi, Minyangi mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Pende mask

African mask known as Minyangi , a smaller version of the giphogo , marking the right to receive fees from subordinate chiefs following circumcision rituals. This mask became flatter over time to fit the door of the chieftaincy hut. The protrusions at the top do not represent horns, but symbolize the arms of the chief. Matt polychrome patina. Slightly missing.
The Western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the Eastern have settled on the banks of the Kasai downstream from Tshikapa. The influences of the neighboring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba, and Salempasu have been imprinted on their extensive tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity, the realistic Mbuya masks, produced every ten years, have a festive function, and embody different ...


View details

180.00

Lega Kayamba small mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Lega mask

Reduced version of this African Lega mask whose horns allow identification. Satin patina, residual kaolin. These masks indicated the stage that its holder had reached within the Bwami, a learning society composed of different ranks, and joined by wives whose spouse had reached the third level, that of the ngandu. Sold with base. Total height: 24 cm.

Within the Lega, the Bwami society open to men and women,organized social and political life. There were up to seven levels of initiation, each associated with emblems. Following their exodus from Uganda in the seventeenth century, the Lega settled on the west bank of the Lualaba River in the DRC. Also known as Warega, they live in self-contained villages surrounded by palisades, usually on hilltops. The role of chief, kindi, is ...


View details

280.00

Lari / Teke fertility pattern
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lari statue

The traditional African art of the Lari bears the influence of the groups with which they cohabit: Beembe, Sundi, Bwende, and Teke. A population originating from the Kongo Kingdom, the Lari , Lali , Baladi , have settled in Teke territory. Matrilineal, they are organized into lineages headed by a chief mfumu kanda , and grouped in villages under the authority of the chief mfumu mpu. They live by agriculture and hunting, the latter requiring the use of specific rites in which sculptures come into play. Witch doctors and healers also employ statuettes, including "mamuanga", as well as sculptures relating to the initiation cult lemba .
An anthropomorphic figure with a bearded and striated face, this statue offers a typically Kongo keloid on the forehead. The arms are ...


View details

380.00

Wé Guéré Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Wé Mask

Various excrescences give this warrior's mask, which is supposed to provoke fear, a fantastic aspect. In the center, small holes make up the eyes. The satin patina on which partially flaked residues agglomerate is magnified by the brilliance of golden highlights.
The Wé produced African masks that are the result of interlocking stylistic forms. The Dan , in the north, and the Wé of the south (the Krou group including the Guéré , the Wobé of the northeast, and the Wé of Liberia called Kran or Khran), made use of frequent borrowing due to their proximity. The elements of the bush, protruding volumes of the forehead, horns and fangs, zoomorphic jaw in some cases evoking the gaping mouth of an animal creature, are associated with human features marking the duality of the ...


View details

180.00

Wé Guéré Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Wé Mask

Ex-French African art collection.
The Wé , ethnic group of western Côte d'Ivoire have produced African masks that are the result of interlocking stylistic forms. The Dan , to the north, and the Wé of the south (group Krou including Guéré, the Wobé of the northeast and the Wé of Liberia called Kran or Khran), have used frequent borrowings due to their proximity. The elements of the bush, protubating volumes of the forehead evoking a horn, zoomorphic jaw, are associated with human features marking the duality of the divine. Before the 1960s, masks, whose design was inspired by the visits of spirits during dreams, accompanied most activities such as war, dance, singing, hunting. Each of these masks had a name associated with its function. It remained the property of the dancer's ...


View details

180.00

Cup carrier Luba Shankadi
Sold item
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Luba

A kneeling female figure with a hemispheric container mboko , a gourd that was filled with kaolin, an image of purity and the spiritual world. These containers were used by different Luba societies, and groups of prophets, more generally by the mediums of the society of divination Kilumbu, Bilumbu , or by the healers of society Buhabo . The soothsayers Mbudye also used it. It was a matter, individually or collectively, to consult the spirits of the ancestors through specialists.
Red brown orange skate. Erosions, cracks on the cut.
According to P. Nooter, these figures, seated or kneeling as appropriate, also represented the soothsayer's wife, underscoring her importance in the divination process bilumbu . According to some Lubas, however, although a woman, she would represent ...


View details


Sold for 190.00 Find similar item

Luba Cup Carrier
Sold item
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Luba

Gracious head-wearing for this seated female figure with the mboko cup, a calabash filled with kaolin, symbolizing purity and the spiritual world, and whose visitors to the king were silent. A small face, a long neck, and a bust where the scarifications in use are written in diamond and epi. According to P.Nooter these figures represented the soothsayer's wife, which underlines its importance in the process of divination bilumbu. Small cavities at the top were used to introduce magical-purpose active ingredients. Semi-mate velvety patina. Abrasions.


Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is the Katanga, specifically the region of the Lubu River, so the name (Baluba, which means the Lubas). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ...


View details

Sold

Cup carrier Luba Shankadi
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Luba

This female figure with a tiered hairstyle has a mboko" , calabash that was filled with kaolin, symbolizing purity and the spiritual world. These containers were used by different Luba societies, more generally by the mediums of the divination society Kilumbu, Bilumbu, or by the healers of the society Buhabo . The soothsayers Mbudye also used it. The faces of these characters embodying the guardian spirits show a peaceful interiority. According to P.Nooter these figures also represented the soothsayer's wife, which underlines its importance in the divination process bilumbu . According to some Luba, however, although a woman, she would represent the first soothsayer Luba, and would also be an allegory of royalty linked to the powerful society of the Mbudye associated with royal power. ...


View details

180.00

Great Mask Kumbukutu Ndunga Woyo
Sold item
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Woyo mask

Initially made from a gourd, the masks Ndunga were then carved out of wood. They were worn accessorized with a banana leaf suit. The whole thing referred to a sanctimonious saying. The bakama was a civil order regulatory society with different levels, including the bandunga, secret police and religious authority. The masks appeared later during rituals of purification or protection against calamities, at funerals of dignitaries, or inductions of chiefs. Locally chipped polychrome crusty patina.
The Vili, the Lâri, Sûndi, Woyo, Bembé, Bwende, Yombé and Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, led by King ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory, copper and slave trade. Similarly, beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary with a codified gesture in ...


View details


Sold for 245.00 Find similar item

Chokwe Mukishi wa Thela mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Tschokwe mask

The Tschokwe, in African art, have a male association, the mukanda, which makes use of some thirty African masks , made of wood, related to ancestors, for various social purposes: the cikugu mask, the cihongo, the pwo mask, kalelwa, cikunza, but also this type of animal mask, of which there are variants, which was worn on a basketry base. It was also attached colored cotton fabrics and various small objects. It embodies the royal eagle and therefore symbolizes royalty. The mask has a bifid articulated beak. Red brown satin patina. The Tschokwe, of Bantu culture, had established themselves in eastern Angola, but also in Congo and Zambia. Following various alliances, they mixed with the Lunda who taught them to hunt. Their social organization also influenced the Tschokwe ...


View details

230.00

Chokwe animal mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Tschokwe mask

The Tschokwe, in African art, have a male association, the mukanda, which makes use of some thirty African masks , made of wood, related to ancestors, for various social purposes: the cikugu mask, the cihongo, the pwo mask, kalelwa, cikunza, but also this type of animal mask, of which there are variants, which was worn on a basketry base. Colored cotton cloth and various small objects were also attached to it.
Red brown satin patina.
The Tschokwe, of Bantu culture, had established themselves in the east of Angola, but also in Congo and Zambia. Following various alliances, they mixed with the Lunda who taught them hunting. Their social organization also influenced the Tschokwe society. The Tschokwe eventually dominated the Lunda, whose kingdom was ...


View details

230.00

Lega Bwami statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lega statue

In African art, this anthropomorphic sculpture of the Lega, lacking arms, was intended for an initiate of the Bwami .
It was part of a set used throughout the initiations.
The teacher guided the lega aspirant to a place where African lega masks and statuettes were displayed, and it was through careful observation that the future initiate had to guess the more or less complex meaning of these objects, true metaphors referring largely to proverbs and sayings.
Those who were not allowed to see the object, in order to be protected from it, had to undergo costly ceremonies, and sometimes even join the lower rank of the Bwami,kongabulumbu, at great expense to the families. Each of these initiations took place over seven days and involved at least seven performances. ...


View details

100.00

Lega Iginga Introductory Statuette
Sold item
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > League figurines

A sculpted figure associated with a proverb or saying, whose only Bwami initiates could decipher and understand the symbolic significance. Inventive, rectangular proportions for this little character whose head takes up the cannons of Thega masks. Feet and hands are digitized, hands gathered in front of the bust. Mate patina, velvety, desicit cracks.
The African art of the Lega , Balega, or Warega , is distinguished by its initiation statuettes, also made of ivory, some of which were kept in a basket for the highest ranks of the Bwami of different communities. This type of tribal art statuette Iginga ( Maginga in the plural), was the property of the high-ranking officers of the Bwami, a secret society that admits men and their wives, and governs social life. This organization was ...

Songola Nsindi mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Songola mask

Flat mask, pierced with circular and rectangular holes for the mouth incised with teeth. The superciliary arches, in relief, emphasize an exorbitant look. Cracked two-tone patina. Height on base: 55 cm. Mixed by marriage with the Lega, Ngengele and Zimba, the Songola are governed by the elders of the lineages. They borrowed from the Luba and Songye, the Luhuna institution composed of dignitaries and that of the Bwami by their lega wives. The Songola live by hunting and fishing, and they are involved in sculpture, although the objects associated with the Bwami cult come from the Lega. Among their reduced statuary, the figures of the ancestors of the Nsubi society are reminiscent of those of the Mbole, while other sculptures were kept in baskets as among the Lega. Masks such as our ...


View details

110.00





Previously viewed items
African art  -  Brussels - Paris - London

© 2021 - Digital Consult SPRL

Essentiel Galerie SPRL
73A, rue de Tournai - 7333 Tertre - Belgique
+32 (0)65.529.100