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African art items:


The achievements of African tribal art fascinated many European artists and collectors in the 20th century. From André Breton to Picasso, all were seized with a buying fever that quickly spread in the middle. If these sculptures are more of an artistic dimension for Westerners, it is nevertheless through their ritual sacralisation that they reveal themselves for the African peoples. Their ceremonial role confers on them a unique power that distinguishes them from other forms of ethnic art. These works were acquired (sold or offered by natives) throughout the twentieth century by ethnologists on mission or colonial cooperatives to be exhibited in museums, or integrated into prestigious private collections. This is the story of these pieces that we propose to discover through our gallery and our website.

Chokwe Mask/ Lwena Pwo
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African art > African mask > Tschokwe Mask

This small mask realistically reproduces its orange-red laine hairstyle, that of the Chokwe women, coated with red earth. The headband engraved with parallel lines assembled in diamonds would be a typical Angolan headdress. The details of the face have been delicately sculpted, offering exceptional finesse. Break on the edge, at the ear. Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwé were then subjected to the Lunda empire from which they inherited a new hierarchical system and the sanctity of power. Nevertheless, the Chokwes never fully embraced these new social and political contributions. Three centuries later, they eventually seized the capital of Lunda weakened by internal conflicts, thus contributing to the dismantling of the kingdom. The Chokwé did not ...


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Spoon Baoulé Kplé kleple
African art > Spoon > Spoon Baule

The usual objects have always been the mediums of choice for the artistic expression of African sculptors, especially in Côte d'Ivoire. The rice spoons of the Baoulé, and the neighbouring Dan, were not only intended to be offered to the most hospitable woman in the community, as a trophy. They were used at community meals closing traditional festivals and ritual ceremonies but were also used in fertility rituals: rice was then thrown on the crowd to ensure protection and fertility.

The handle of this ceremonial spoon or shovel is made up of a miniature of the Goli face mask named Kplé kplé yasua, worn by teenagers. These masks exist in black and red, male and female, and dance in turn, but this attribution varies from village to village. The ornamentation of this prestigious ...


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280.00

Kasai Kuba Shoowa Velvet
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African art > African Textile > Kuba fabric

The African art and refinement of the Weaving KubaProducts in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a raffia textile base on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the technique of velvet weaving to the Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the ...


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Gelede Yoruba Crest Mask
African art > African mask > David Gabat

Ex-English African art collection.
The Gelede country in Nigeria pays tribute to mothers, especially the oldest of them, whose powers would be comparable to those of the Yoruba gods, or orisa, and ancestors, osi and who can be used for profit but also for the misfortune of society. In the latter case these women are named aje . Masked ceremonies, through performances using masks, costumes and dances, are supposed to urge mothers to use their extraordinary qualities for a peaceful and constructive purpose, for the good of society. With a long, sharp growth, this polychrome mask features yoruba features: large globular eyes and jugal scarifications. In rigorously organized ceremonies, each dancer embodies the deity or character chosen by the mask he wears. This \


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150.00

Ancestor statue Mangbetu Beli
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African art > African Statues > Statue Mangbetu

The statues of African art Mangbetu, court art
Geometric motifs that are inscribed on this naturalistic female figure evoke the body paintings and tribal scarifications of the Mangbetu, analogous to those of the Asua pygmies with with the tribe had a relationship. The latter varied depending on the circumstances. The fan hairstyle was sported by the Mangbetu: from an early age, the children were compressed from the cranial box by means of raffia bonds. Later, the young women \

Hat "JuJu" Bamileke /Juju hat
objet vendu
African art > Usual african items > Bamileke Headdress

The Bamileke in traditional African art
Small format, tone of bright blue for this tribal headdress consisting of an ingenious assemblage of feathers.
It was during the elephant dance, tso, that the members of the society Kuosi, Kwosi , wore these impressive headdresses. They were worn horizontally above a multicolored costume consisting of a large beaded mask with wide circular ears, mbap mteng, a fabric fabric, ndop , adorned with monkey fur and a leopard belt. These dances took place during festive ceremonies and funerals. Hats were once made with parrot feathers, the rarity of which was high cost. The feathers are attached to fabric-covered wooden strips, placed around a circular frame bound by a basket of wicker fibres. A society originally composed of valiant ...

Luba Shankadi large water pipe
African art > pipe > Luba pipe

Ex-Belgian African art collection.
Riding the furnace of a water pipe, this Luba female effigy, a spiritual medium, has classic features in an ovoid face. Its Shankadi-type headdress, behind a wide headband that unveils a shaved forehead, evokes the hairstyles of Luba women at the beginning of the twentieth century. Her attitude, with her hands positioned on both sides of the chest, reminds us that the secrets of royalty (bizila) belong to women through their role as political and spiritual intermediary. Satin brown patina.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a Central African people. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the lubu river, so the name (Baluba, which means «the Lubas»). They were born of a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the ...


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250.00

Statue of female ancestor Lobi
African art > African Statues > New product

Ex-collection French African art.
This effigy of a Ligan ancestor was carved after various rituals including his descendants and prescribed by the soothsayer. It is then when the lineage goes out that the statue can be ceded or abandoned. This feminine effigy with a crest hairstyle is represented semi-flexed legs, a hand resting on the abdomen. The physiognomy suggests a deep meditation. Powerful long legs extend a prominent buttock. Desication cracks, matte powdery patina, ochre pigment residue. The populations of the same cultural region, grouped under the name " lobi ", make up one-fifth of the inhabitants of Burkina Faso. Few in Ghana, they have also settled in northern Côte d'Ivoire. It was at the end of the 18th century that the Lobi, from North Ghana, settled among the ...


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480.00

Wé Ivory Coast Mask
objet vendu
African art > African mask > Guéré Mask

The Wé , an ethnic group from western Côte d'Ivoire, have produced African masks that are the result of interlocking stylistic forms. The dan , to the north, and the Wé south ( Krou group including the Guéré , the Wobé of the northeast and the Wé of Liberia called Kran or Khran), used frequent borrowings due to their proximity. The elements of the bush, protubating volumes of the forehead evoking a horn, zoomorphic jaw, are associated with human features marking the duality of the divine. Before the 1960s, masks, whose design was inspired by the visits of spirits during dreams, accompanied most activities such as war, dance, singing, hunting. Each of these masks had a name associated with its function. It remained the property of the dancer's lineage. The mass of the forehead ...


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Kasai Kuba Shoowa Velvet
objet vendu
African art > African Textile > Kuba fabric

The African art and refinement of the Weaving KubaProducts in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a raffia textile base on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the technique of velvet weaving to the Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the ...


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Zauli Gouro Mask
objet vendu
African art > African mask > Zaouli Mask

African art Gouro.
Among the group of Mande of the south, in central Côte d'Ivoire, the Gouro have been using since the 1950s a family of African masks associated with the Zaouli dance . Like the Goli masks of the Baoulé, all Guro masks come in two zoomorphic masks followed by a third anthropomorph, which is considered the wife of the mask zamblé , the Gu . The Gu , whose function is apotropaic, represents a young woman with the criteria of beauty specific to Guro, especially facial scarifications and lime teeth. The zaouli embodies a mature man with a beard represented by raffia cords attached to the lower perforations of the mask's contours. The Zamblé embodies a bush animal, usually a middle lope.
Half-human half-animal, the sculpted face evoking an antelope is ...


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Maternity Tagbana
objet vendu
African art > African Maternity > Maternity Tagbana

Ex collection of African art Emmanuel Lettelier, agronomist, having been stationed in Katiola in the 70s-80s and whose great-grandfather François was a close friend of Father Jules Moury who opened a Catholic mission in this department from Ivory Coast.

This is a unique piece representing a mother nursing her child from a stool. Polychrome has survived the passage of time. The sculpture of bodies and faces is faithful. A headband decorated with cowries accompanies the maternal headdress. The patina is very rough and mostly black. The Tagbana belong to the Senoufo ethnic group but are found in the north-east of Côte d'Ivoire, where the Gour or Voltaic group, one of the oldest tribes in the country, is also located. Religious beliefs are strongly implanted among the Tagbana. ...


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Ci Wara Bamana Crest Mask
objet vendu
African art > African mask > Bambara Mask

African art Bamana.
Sculpted by the blacksmith numu , also playing the role of soothsayer and healer, this narrow vertical crest is represented here without the successive arches depicting the mane, so it is a female antelope carrying her cub on her back. It would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. They recall the myth through the stylized representation of a hippotrague antelope, whose name ci wara means "fauve de la terre". Decorated on the head and the sides of metal veneers engraved with the repulsed, the ears and snout are also embellished with cotton yarn pompoms attached to pearls. The top of the horns tilted backwards is also covered with leather and hair. The patina is speckled, mate. Worn at the top of the skull ...


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Dowayo Fertility Dolls
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African art > African Statues > Namji doll

Trapped in multiple necklaces of glass paste beads, these coupled anthropomorphic figures whose shaggy heads emerge, as haggard, from this colorful swaddling, have small limbs composed of loops in beige beads. Amulet cauris reinforce the fertility vow. An object of modest size, easily transportable, its supposedly active role does not abandon its aesthetic character.
Ethnie of northern Cameroon composed of animist mountaineers, the Dowayo , " Namji ", " Namchi ", use anthropomorphic figures, dolls, as part of fertility rituals. The women carried with them these dolls donated by their husbands in the hope of becoming mothers. The use of dolls by young African women is not done exclusively within the initiation context. When menstruation occurs, the girl is considered a potential ...


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Ife Figures
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African art > African Statues > Ife figures

Ex private English collection of African art. The style of these statues is to be related to the period of Obalufon II and his wife Queen Moremi. Both shone in the Ife kingdom by their pacification policy known as Ita Yemoo. The very term Ita Yemoo defines the appearance of the Ife queens dynasty. Moremi was initially married to the opponent of Obalufon II, the Oranmiyan. By the game of new alliances, she brought a period of calm within the kingdom. Most of Ita Yemoo's striking works are a bronze representation of the couple with crossed arms and legs. As the first queen, an annual "Edi" cult is dedicated to Moremi. In addition to the bronze works, there are terracotta creations but also more contemporary wooden examples dedicated to the "Edi" cult. Each character is adorned with royal ...


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Altar Opà Asen
objet vendu
African art > black iron > Altar Opà Asen

"Ex-collection English African art

It is in a room of the house reserved for this purpose that the great families of Benin (former Dahomey) kept portable altars made from pieces of metal. Asen, these sticks were created for each ancestor, serving as go-betweens between the world of the living and the dead, and prayers and offerings were made during a ceremony called "ahanbiba" during the dry season. An Asen was dedicated to an ancestor and dedicated sacrifices throughout the year, and among the Yoruba in neighboring Nigeria, these sticks were emblems depicting birds. for divination ceremonies related to the god of herbalists and occult sciences, Osanyin, or that of divination, Orunmila. a central shaft, overcoming a cup, eight rods support a circular platform having a skit. ...


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Songye Nkondi Fetish
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African art > African Statues > Songye Fetish

Ex-French tribal art collection.
The brass nails, inserted on the face of this sculpture of African art, nkondi (pl.nkisi) are said to be related to smallpox. The Maniema region was hit hard by epidemics and in African culture, metal has magical, therapeutic and apotropaic properties. Ritual ingredients were also introduced into the abdomen, absent in this copy, in the horn, sometimes also in pouches attached to the loincloth, in order to strengthen the power of the object. Textiles, feathers and necklaces were also necessary attributes to guard against witchcraft. Animal skin is the hair of this character with a face reminiscent of ethnic masks, he also wears a skin loincloth, and symbolic accessories are knotted: a shell and a horn filled with solidified red bark powder. On the ...


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Statue of Nkisi Congo Solongo
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African art > African Statues > Statue of Congo

Characteristic of the African art of the Solongo of Angola, tribe of the Kongo group, this tribal sculpture, male effigy, is camped in a decided attitude, in order to master the forces that the statue wants to face. The elements bilongo which exacerbate its power, consist of nails whose bust is dotted, and a magical charge in a cavity sealed by a mirror and arranged on the abdomen. The face sculpture, typical of the Solongo characters, takes on an oval shape. The voluminous hairstyle, placed high on the skull and giving off a shaved forehead, consists of a bouquet of feathers that is held by a wicker strap coated with a resinous aggregate similar to that which covers the body, which looks crusty. The face of this Figure Nkisi has a smooth, sainly patina that contrasts sharply with the ...

Bozo fish puppet
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African art > Puppets > Bozo Mask

Bozo Polychromy in the African Art of Mali
Bright Colors to Celebrate the Water Genius under the Sun, "Faro", with this Bozo zoomorphic puppet mask. The articulated fins, like the tail, are held by rubber strips, which are veiled by patterned fabric. Abrasions of use. The Bozo, mostly fishermen and farmers, live in the northern part of the Bambara country in the niger's inner delta and remain semi-nomadic today, moving their homes as seasonal floods occur. Mande-speaking people, they speak sorogama. Within their group, we can distinguish the Sorko or Sorogo, the Hain, and the Tie.Besides their remarkable masks, the Bozo and Bambara are renowned for their puppets of varied size and frequently articulated, exhibited during the puppet theatre Sogow bo which organizes itself on the ...


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Female figure Ngbaka
African art > African Statues > Statuette Ngbaka

The eyes of this African statuette sculpted by the Ngbaka or the neighbouring Ngbandi were originally encrusted with fragments of seashells or glass. This statuette probably represents Nabo , a spirit that ensures the fertility and healing of children, protecting hunting and harvesting. She was also at the center of cult dances, accompanied or not by a figure embodying Seto . Missing on one foot. Velvet brown patina, nuanced with red ochre.
Tribu located on the left bank of Ubangui, in northwestern Congo, the Sudanese-speaking Ngbaka practice agriculture, and their artistic achievements were inspired by those of the neighbouring tribes, with a distinctive feature however, the line of the front dotted with linear keloids. Young people are prepared for adult life through rituals ...


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150.00

Statuette Baoulé, Baulé Blolo bia
African art > _1 > Statue Baule

The "doubles inverted" in the African art sculptures of the Baule
A sixty ethnic groups populate Côte d'Ivoire, including the Baoulé, in the center, Akans from Ghana, people of the savannah, practicing hunting and agriculture while like the Gouro from which they borrowed ritual cults and carved masks. Two types of statues are produced by the Baoulé , Baulé , in the ritual framework: The statues Waka-Sona , " be wood " in baoulé, evoke a asssou oussou , be of the earth. They are part of a type of statues intended to be used as a medium tool by the komien soothsayers, the latter being selected by the spirits asye usu in order to communicate the revelations of the afterlife. The second type of statues are the ", the "of the afterlife, male, the Blolo bian or feminine, the blolo bia , ...


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240.00





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