...
Search option


African art items:


The achievements of African tribal art fascinated many European artists and collectors in the 20th century. From André Breton to Picasso, all were seized with a buying fever that quickly spread in the middle. If these sculptures are more of an artistic dimension for Westerners, it is nevertheless through their ritual sacralisation that they reveal themselves for the African peoples. Their ceremonial role confers on them a unique power that distinguishes them from other forms of ethnic art. These works were acquired (sold or offered by natives) throughout the twentieth century by ethnologists on mission or colonial cooperatives to be exhibited in museums, or integrated into prestigious private collections. This is the story of these pieces that we propose to discover through our gallery and our website.

Relic statue Fang Byeri
African art > African Statues > Fang figure

Several variants of Fang Byeri statues are illustrated in The African Byeri art. Each family has a "Byeri", or reliquary box, in which the bones of ancestors are preserved. These boxes were guarded by the oldest man in the village, the "esa". The reliquary boxes were topped with a statue or a head that acted as custodian of the "byi" boxes. These were kept in a dark corner of the box, and were intended to divert evil influences to someone else. They were also used during the initiation ceremonies of young people linked to the company "So". During the holidays, the statues were separated from their boxes and paraded. This piece intended to be entered in a basket-reliquary by the posterior stalk, has a dark head the pupils are pierced. The statue has a surface coated with a thick crusty ...


View details

280.00

Pendé Ritual Fetish
African art > African fetish > Pendé Fetish

Ex-French African art collection.
Estimated in the auction room between 500 and 700 euros, this cup forming the base of the bust of this statuette has a matte surface accompanied by grainy inlays. It attests to a use intended for therapeutic or magic preparations. This object, probably belonging to the soothsayer, has a patina that has been glossed up by the gripping and ritual anointings, revealing a beautiful mahogany wood under the blackish bed-enceding. The western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the oriental settled on the banks of the Kasai river downstream of Tshikapa. The influences of the neighbouring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu, were imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity the masks Mbuya , ...


View details

240.00

Mangbetu back-rest
African art > African Chair > Mangbetu back-rest

Ex-collection Swiss African art.
The ruler of the kingdoms of tribal Africa, not sitting on the ground in any way, a great diversity of seats were elaborated by the sculptors, such as this badge of sovereignty, cephalomorphic, embodying the power of the Chief Mangbetu. The seat from which arise two small brass domes associated with fertility, is supported by four feet. It is covered with oiled leather while the contours are embellished with large upholstery nails. The high hairstyle is characteristic of that of the Mangbetu aristocrats: from an early age, children were compressed from the cranial box by means of raffia bonds. Later, the Mangbetu \


View details

650.00

Wooden Log / Congo Kasai Mortar
African art > African Chair > Table Congo

Belgian African art collection.
Exceptional coin, very rare log in monoxyle wood, intended for various uses, including threshing and pounding of barks, branches and plant stems, such as raffia fibers. This object could be used as a flat support on which the damp barks were hammered, the hollows allowing to collect emulsions. The softened material lost its rough character. It could then be prepared and worked like a cloth. The peopleofs of Congo also used juice extracted from leaves, fresh stems and seeds, from certain plant species for medicinal purposes. Cleaned and scraped on the flat part of the log, a sap was pulled for therapeutic use. Some pigments may also have been prepared, crushed, for ritual use, kaolin residues are in fact embedded on the surface.  Thus the sorcerers ...


View details

Faire offre

2500.00

Statuette Baoulé Waka Sona Blolo Bia
African art > African Statues > Baule figure

Ex-Belgian tribal art collection.
The "doubles reversed" in the African art sculptures of the Baule, A sixty ethnic groups populate Côte d'Ivoire, including the Baoulé, in the centre, Akans from Ghana, people of the savannah, practicing hunting and farming while like the Gouro from which they borrowed ritual cults and carved masks. Two types of statues are produced by the Baoulé , Baulé , in the ritual framework: The statues Waka-Sona , " be wood " in baoulé, evoke a asssou oussou , be of the earth. They are part of a type of statues intended to be used as a medium tool by the komien soothsayers, the latter being selected by the spirits asye usu in order to communicate the revelations of the afterlife. The second type of statues are the ", the "of the afterlife, male, the Blolo bian ...

Bété Face Mask / Gouro Tohourou
African art > African mask > Guro Mask

Ex-Belgian African art collection.
The Bété form a people established on the left bank of the Sassandra River southwest of the Ivory Coast. Close to the Kouya and Niabwa , the invoice of their masks, as well as their function, have great similarities. These masks introduced by the Niabwa were carved with the aim of provoking psychological conditions conducive to rituals. Each of them had a secret name and materialized the powers of the forest.  At the disposal of the chief, they were exhibited during funeral ceremonies or on the occasion of the great feasts of meetings between several villages. According to Koré, in Côte d'Ivoire's Living Masks", Bété masks include two types: the tohourou and the dancer mask glé . The piece offers a broad front that a scarification divides ...


View details

280.00

Diola Terracotta
African art > African Terracotta > Diola Pottery

Symbols of fertility in the traditional and ritual African art of Senegal
Etablie in Lower Casamance, the Diola ethnic group is made up of Floup, Baïnouk, Mandjak, and Balante. They derive their livelihood from growing rice, eaten reduced to flour. The Mandjak practice weaving. The blacksmiths, from a caste of two families, also work the wood and are supposed to transmit leprosy and cure it. The artisanal life of the Diola is distinguished by the creation of jewelry, ceremonial adornments, weaving, basketry, leather and metal work. In addition to the manufacture of abundant basketry, the Diola work not only terracotta for a utilitarian but also ritual purpose, the animist cults maintain themselves despite the presence of Islam.  The steps of the manufacture of this naturalistic ...


View details

480.00

Maternity Dan Lemei
objet vendu
African art > African Statues > Statue Dan

Ex-Swiss African art collection.
Gifts of women, food, festive ceremonies and honorable status once rewarded sculptors to whom this talent was bestowed during a dream. The latter was the means of communication of Du , an invisible spiritual power, with men. The rare statuary played a prestigious role with its holder. These are mainly effigies of wives, lm , wooden human beings. These are not incarnations of spirits or effigies of ancestors, but prestigious figures representing living people, often commissioned by the chiefs, whose statues will bear the names. They are placed in miniature boxes built for this purpose. This maternity figure is depicted with her child on the back. It features a small loincloth and fine coloured pearl necklaces, and a headdress made up of braided ...


View details

Sold

Statue Baoulé Waka Sona
objet vendu
African art > African Statues > Figure Baule

Statue of a male ancestor of African art Baoulé, this Waka-Sona ,Waka sran, " be wooden " in Baoulé, evokes a asssous oussou, being of the earth, genius of nature. It is one of a type of statues intended to be used as a medium tool by the komien soothsayers, or "komiené", the latter being selected by the spirits asye usu in order to communicate the revelations of beyond or blolo . The second type of statues are the spouses of the afterlife, male, blolo bian or feminine, the bian blolo.
In order to bring them dress, the braided beards of baoulé men were smeared with shea butter. Fertility and lineage are also symbolized by the attitude of the character, hands positioned around the navel. Dark brown satin patina.


View details

Sold

Wé Guéré Mask
African art > African mask > Wé Mask

Ex-French African art collection.
The Wé , ethnic group of western Côte d'Ivoire have produced African masks that are the result of interlocking stylistic forms. The Dan , to the north, and the Wé of the south (group Krou including Guéré, the Wobé of the northeast and the Wé of Liberia called Kran or Khran), have used frequent borrowings due to their proximity. The elements of the bush, protubating volumes of the forehead evoking a horn, zoomorphic jaw, are associated with human features marking the duality of the divine. Before the 1960s, masks, whose design was inspired by the visits of spirits during dreams, accompanied most activities such as war, dance, singing, hunting. Each of these masks had a name associated with its function. It remained the property of the dancer's ...


View details

350.00

Great Rider Dogon
African art > African Rider > Dogon Rider

Prestigious sculptures in the African art of Mali
Frequent horseman's representations, among the Dogon of Mali, refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos, ancestors of men, resurrected by the creator god Amma, descended on the earth carried by an arch transformed into a horse. Moreover, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious leader named Hogon, was parading on his mount at his induction because, according to custom, he was not to set foot on the ground. In the area of the cliffs of Sangha, inaccessible on horseback, the priests wore it, while hating in reference to the mythical ancestor Nommo. The Dakar-Djibouti mission of 1931, led by Marcel Griaule , was tasked with studying in depth the rites of this population ...


View details

1500.00

Dogon rider statuette
African art > African Statues > Dogon Rider

Image of the rider in African art Dogon
This statuette would represent the Hogon, which ascended without a saddle. Beneath the matte, grainy ritual coat, a light wood and satin burgundy brown areas appear. Eroded base. Desication cracks. The frequent representations of a rider, among the Dogon of Mali, refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos, ancestors of men, resurrected by the creator god Amma, descended on the earth carried by an arch transformed into a horse. Moreover, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious leader named Hogon, was parading on his mount at his induction because, according to custom, he was not to set foot on the ground. In the area of the cliffs of Sangha, inaccessible on horseback, the priests wore ...


View details

280.00

Markha Mask of N tomo
African art > African mask > Marka Mask

Markha African art.
The tall volume forming the forehead of this African mask is asked by a crest and appendages evoking horns and ears. The ends of one of the horns, and one ear, are slightly damaged. A straight nasal ridge runs towards an oblong jaw lined with protruding lips. Brass plates hammered and engraved with the repulsed, specific to marka sculptures, give an unyielding aspet to this warrior mask. These masks were used in the association of the N'tomo grouping uncircumcised young, the frequent presence of horns symbolizing "the degree of the nature of the knowledge" according to S. Diakonoff.Patine clear brown nuanced, especially Satin. The Marka, Maraka en Bamana, or Warka, are Muslim city dwellers of Soninke origin, based in southern Niger. They now speak bamana and have ...


View details

280.00

Statuette Mumuye / Chamba
African art > African Statues > Statue Mumuye

Belgian African art collection.
It is in the region of north-eastern Nigeria, limited by the Benoué loop and the Cameroonian border, that the group of about 100,000 Mumuye live, mainly from agriculture. As the area was difficult to access, they remained relatively isolated until 1950. Their statuary was discovered around 1968. The Mumuye of Nigeria, like the Tiv, are organized into initiation societies staggered into age classes that take place for young boys in a box, tsafi, in which the statues are stored. They reinforce the prestige of their holder, but also participate in healing rituals, divination and ordalies. This figure has upper limbs spread out of the bust, hands leaning on the lower abdomen, legs spaced in the extension of the pelvis. These traits are generally found in ...


View details

350.00

Dan Gagon / Maou Mask
promo art africain
African art > African mask > Diomande Mask

Ex-French African art collection.
A curved beak-shaped mouth, evoking calao, extends the lower part of this African mask Dan Maou , Mau. With a beard that the ritual coatings have stiffened, this face that borrows the gaze of the race mask zapkei Dan , hesitating between two natures, turns into a zoomorphic piece. This type of composition is recurrent in African tribal statuary. The Dan populations of the north known as Yacouba of Côte d'Ivoire and the Maou de Touba (Maouka), after borrowing them from the mandé people neighbour, use them in secret male ceremonies including the Koma of the Maou . The eyes are surrounded by a thin red cloth that once came from the clothing of Senegalese gunners. Three metal teeth spring from the mouth. The parallel grooves surrounding the contours of ...


View details

375.00 € 280.00 ( -25.3 %)

Nyabwa Bété Mask
objet vendu
African art > African mask > Nyabwa Bété Mask

Ex private collection of African art Pascal Roland ( Belgium).

With an ombudsman function in the African art, the Glé mask is carved in order to provoke fear and to represent the negative force of the forest. This mask is used either during funeral ceremonies or during the feasts that occurs for the meetings between villages. Formerly it was a war mask that had as utility to prepare the men for the fight. He have horns turning over the mouth like the legs of a spider going on her prey. Following armed conflicts, this mask chaired at peace ceremonies and to the daily justice sessions.


View details

Sold

Iron currency Mumuye
African art > African Currencies > Iron currency

This piece of currency is formed by two big iron bars twisted together like a rope-like shape. This model circulated in Nigeria in the pré-colonial years.


View details

550.00

Dogon Bombou-Toro ancestor couple
African art > African Statues > Statues Dogon

French African art collection.
This pair of effigies of so-called Bombou-Toro-style ancestors from the centre of the south cliff (according to the designation established by Hélène Leloup in " Statuaire Dogon" 1994) embody the primordial couple "nommos" at the origin of the creation among the Dogon of Mali and Burkina Faso. Figures symbolizing unity and harmony, they received libations supposed to divert wounds and plagues, increase harvests and fertility. Represented sitting together by a common base, long arms bent like paws, the characters in elegant verticality have a similar head, buttoned eyes, a nasal ridge running up to the crest, and a beard. The necks extend with a tubular prominence resting on the rounded volume of the chest. Altered wood, ravine. Clear skate sneers. ...


View details

490.00

Dogon Gate
African art > Door shutter > Dogon Gate

The systems of closure of the Sudanese regions in African art
This door Dogon equipped with its lock, carefully carved, evokes by its representations the rich cosmogony Dogon. According to Dogon mythology, breasts evoking the bisexual ancestor Nommo are an allegory of fertility. The series of sculpted characters seem to wear masks. They often symbolize previous generations, mythical ancestors, but the owners of the attic also appear frequently. The door is made up of a single sign.
Small alterations of the patina and abrasions of the wood, revealing a light wood.
The motifs on the doors in Mali, apart from their decorative value, are intended to deter the intruder, whether human or animal, from entering. The locks, like the doors, are cut from woods chosen according to ...


View details

1550.00

Bozo zoomorphic puppet mask
African art > Puppets > Bozo Mask

Bozo Polychromy in the African Art of Mali
The articulated jaws of this zoomorphic bozo puppet from Mali, sharing cheerful pink and bright green tones, animated his interventions in the context of traditional theatre. The piece was on a stick, and a textile of which there is only a fragment, nailed to the forehead, originally concealed the back side. The different protagonists of the play, animals and characters, in the form of masks but also puppets, were associated with the myths of origin. Seniority cracks.
Piece collected by Guy Mercier, consultant for the Solvay Group, who began to collect a vast collection of early art at the beginning of the 20th century. While radiating in West and Central Africa as part of his work, and collecting in-situ works, the majority of his ...


View details

380.00

Fertility statue Mossi polychrome
objet vendu
African art > African Statues > MossI Statues

Ex-Belgian tribal art collection.
African art at the Mossi. Upper Volta, Burkina Faso since independence, is made up of descendants of the invaders, horsemen from Ghana in the 15th century, named Nakomse , and Tengabibisi , descendants of the natives. Political power is in the hands of the Nakomsé, who assert their power through the statues, while priests and religious leaders come from the Tengabisi, who use masks during their ceremonies. Animists, the Mossi venerate a creative god named Wendé . Each individual would be endowed with a soul, sigha , linked to a totem icne. This female figure, depicted nude, features Mossi ethnic scarifications, which feature black-painted motifs. It has small digitized hands. Fertility is illustrated by its bulging abdomen.





Previously viewed items
African art  -  New York - Paris - London

© 2020 - Digital Consult SPRL

Essentiel Galerie SPRL
73 Rue de Tournai - 7333 Tertre - Belgique
+32 (0)65.529.100