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African art - Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam:

Clay jars are closely associated with the daily life of African populations. Made from the material of muddy ponds and rivers, the rather heterogeneous paste allows the production of objects with thick walls such as jars. The jars, often made of wood, are intended to receive offerings, medicinal plants, or divinatory gris-gris.


Kuba Bushoong Cup
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba Cup

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Abundance of decorative carvings in African Kuba art.
The anthropomorphic cup probably symbolizes the character of Bwoom in masked royal dances. It is formed of heads superimposed on legs. Different forms of cups were sculpted whose ornamentation sought to glorify the qualities of their owners. Satin patina, abrasions and cracks of desiccation.
The extremely organized and hierarchical Kuba society placed at its center a king or nyim inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group.
This one was considered to be of divine origin. At the same time chief of the kingdom and of the Bushoong chieftaincy, he was attributed supernatural virtues stemming from sorcery or from the ancestors. He was therefore responsible for the survival of his subjects, whether it was ...


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90.00

Kwéré calabash container
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kwéré calabash

The round carved cap of this vessel shows a Kwere woman wearing a double sagittal crest. The eyes are inlaid with pearls, giving a piercing look. The attitude refers to fertility. Velvety patina.
The Zaramo and the tribes that surround them, such as the Kwere, have designed dolls that are generally associated with fertility, but to which other virtues are attributed. Its primary role is played during the period of seclusion of the young Zaramo initiate. The novice will behave towards the object as she would towards a child, and will dance with it during the closing ceremonies of the initiation. In the event that the young woman does not conceive, she will adopt the "child. Among the Zaramo and Kwere, this carved motif is repeated at the top of canes, decorates ritual objects ...


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290.00

Luba Shankadi royal caryatid cup
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Luba cup

The figure acting as a caryatid here adopts an unusual posture revealing the most intimate parts of a very detailed anatomy. According to P. Nooter these figures represented the diviner's wife, emphasizing her importance in the process of divination bilumbu. She supports the mboko cup, a calabash that was filled with kaolin, symbolizing purity and the spiritual world, and with which the king's visitors smeared themselves out of respect.
The antelope unfolding at the top also forms a recurring symbolic motif in Luba iconography. Abrasions and desiccation cracks. Matt patina, residual inlays.

The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River, thus the name (Baluba, which ...

Mangbetu terracotta vase
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African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Jarre Mangbetu

A globular body surmounted by a female head styled according to the barrels of the ethnic group affirms the elegance of mangbetu pottery, symbol of fertility. The motifs engraved on the surface echo the traditional scarifications. The work of ceramics, in West and Central Africa, is carried out by women, wives of blacksmiths in the majority of cases. The Mangbetu women, who also produced basketry, excelled in this art.
In the forest in northeastern Zaire, the Mangbetu kingdom has expressed itself through architectural works that impressed European visitors in the 19th century. Their furniture, weapons, adornments and statuary were imbued with a rare aesthetic quality. The Mangbetu story was based on the refinement of his court but also on cannibalistic customs. King Mangbetu Munza ...


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Jarre Boa/Mangbetu
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Boa container

Vase with a neck showing a human head with large ears. Sets of incised motifs decorate the sides, which show female attributes. Brown slip with reddish glints. Abrasions. Related to the Mangbetu and Zande, the Boa inhabit the savannah in the north of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Their anthropomorphic figures were undoubtedly used as part of rites charged with combating the witchcraft of the ndoki society. They are known for their mask with oversized ears, perforated like the ear pavilions of the Eastern Boa, the "bavobongo ". It gave an impressive appearance to its wearer, accentuated by the contrast of colors. The African art mask kpongadomba of the Boa was ordered by the chief kumu who offered it to the most valiant warrior. It was then kept in the hut of his wife. Some ...


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140.00

Ngeende Kuba anthropomorphic cup
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Ngeende Cup

Ex-German African art collection.
. Various forms of palm wine bowls, whose ornamentation sought to glorify the qualities of their owners, were carved for the dignitaries of the Kuba groups. Wine was extracted twice a day from raffia palm trees planted for this purpose, and sold by the cup. Lustrous black-brown patina.
Among the clans kuba , the Ngeende produced an abundance of prestigious sculptures, sometimes intended for neighboring groups. According to tradition, the Ngeende, who are said to be descended from the mythical ancestor Woot, came from north of the Sankuru River. After being defeated by a bushoong king, they joined the Kuba kingdom in the 16th century. They produced a large number of masks associated with the story of the mythical ancestor Woot. The ...


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Lele milk container
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Lele Pot

Like their Kuba neighbors, the Lele have a wide variety of carved objects and sculptures for everyday use, such as this spherical cephalomorphic container with a spout for milk. The slight asymmetry of the features lends this object a childlike sweetness. Dark matt patina. Black metal base: 15/15 cm.
The Lele, neighbors of the Tschokwe and the Pende, live in the west of the Kuba kingdom and share common cultural specificities with the Bushoong of Kuba country. Both groups adorn their prestige objects with similar motifs. Their society, headed by a " nymi" king, includes three classes, that of the Tundu or war chiefs, the Batshwa ("those who reject the Tundu authority"), and the Wongo called after the neighboring ethnic group. The ritual ceremonies are under the authority of the ...


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190.00

Pende Cup
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Pende Cup

Deep flared bowl extended by a thick handle, used for ritual libations during traditional ceremonies or for drinking palm wine. Satin black patina, cracks of desiccation, erosions.
The Western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the Eastern have settled on the banks of the Kasai downstream from Tshikapa. The influences of the neighboring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba, and Salempasu have been imprinted on their extensive tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity the Mbuya masks, realistic ,produced every ten years, have a festive function, and embody different characters, including the chief, the diviner and his wife, the prostitute, the possessed, etc.... The masks of initiation and those of power, the minganji , represent the ancestors and occur ...


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190.00

Kuba braided box
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kuba Basket

Circular box made of wickerwork, with a lid that fits together. The dense, elaborate weaving incorporates certain geometric patterns borrowed from scarification, also visible on shoowa raffia textiles. The inner edge of the lid is missing.

The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for the higher ranks of their society. The Lele live to the west of the Kuba kingdom and share common cultural characteristics with the Bushoong of Kuba country. Both groups decorate their prestige objects with similar motifs.
The extremely organized and hierarchical Kuba society placed at its center a king or nyim inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group.
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Source: Kuba, ed. 5continents, Binkley and Darish.


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150.00

Jarre Mangbetu terracotta
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African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Mangbetu Pottery

This ceramic vase, whose conical neck is carefully highlighted by successive ribs, and whose regular globular body is adorned with a decorative frieze, affirms the elegance of mangbetu productions. The work of ceramics, in West and Central Africa, is carried out by women, wives of blacksmiths in the majority of cases. The Mangbetu women, who also produced basketry, excelled in this art. Black patina speckled with abraded light areas.
In the forest in northeastern Zaire, the Mangbetu kingdom has expressed itself through architectural works that impressed European visitors in the 19th century. Their furniture, weapons, adornments and statuary were imbued with a rare aesthetic quality. The Mangbetu story was based on the refinement of his court but also on cannibalistic customs. King ...


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Carved cup Kuba Lele
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Lele cup

Among the prestigious objects of the Kuba groups, this cephalomorphic cup decorated with geometric motifs has a handle. Shiny patina. Damaged upper contours. Desiccation crack.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the higher ranks of their society. Indeed, several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined designs including cups, drinking horns and beakers. The Lele are established in the west of the Kuba kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers. Intercultural exchanges between the Bushoong of the Kuba territory and the Lele have made the attribution of certain objects difficult, as both groups use the same iconography, composed of faces with elaborate hairstyles and geometric decorative ...


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180.00

Chokwe mortar and pestle
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Tschokwe pot

Cylindrical pot delicately carved with decorative motifs, intended for mixing pigments for therapeutic, cosmetic or ritual use. Lustrous patina inlaid with red ochre, remarkably soft surface. A braided strap links the anthropomorphic pestle to the mortar. The Tschokwe, of Bantu culture, had established themselves in eastern Angola, but also in Congo and Zambia. Following various alliances, they mixed with the Lunda who taught them hunting. Their social organization also influenced the Tschokwe society. The Tschokwe eventually dominated the Lunda, whose kingdom was dismantled at the end of the 19th century. Elephants in the region were hunted for meat, but also for ivory, which was intended for sale, not for the wide range of prestige items for which they excelled. The Tschokwe were ...


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240.00

Tabwa cup
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Tabwa cup

Ex-collection of Belgian African art.
Prestigious object used in ritual ceremonies, this cup has a foot featuring a finely detailed female bust, and balanced proportions. The long braid of the character forms the handle of the vase (indigenous restoration at this place) Missing on one ear.
Related to the Luba, the Tabwa and the populations that surround them generally depict the body in its entirety. The incised motifs of the Tabwa are not simple decorations but coded messages referring to beliefs and origins.
Heterogeneous patina in the browns. Abraded areas. The Tabwa are an ethnic group present in the southeast of the DRC. Simple farmers with no centralized power, they federated around tribal chiefs after having been influenced by the Luba. It is mainly ...


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Box of oracles Gbékré sé Baoulé
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Baule box

African divinatory art.
Destined for a practice still in use today in the Baule region of the southwest, the object consists of a meditating tutelary figure, visibly in meditation, leaning against a circular receptacle with a floor. A mouse, considered to be the messenger of the deities of the earth, lived in the lower compartment of the object and the successive arrangement of the elements it moved was read as an answer to the question put to the diviner. The piece is also equipped with a carrying strap. A metal plate, partially torn, lines the bottom of the box. Shaded brown grainy patina, partially abraded.

Ref: Mathilde Buratti , "Boxes used for divination by mice".

During the 18th century, united under a single banner, this Akan people was, according to ...

Reliquary anthropomorphe Urhobo
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Reliquary anthropomorphe Urhobo

Ex-collection French African Art This reliquary box in the shape of a character represents Owedjebo, ancestor founder, accompanied by his wife and their child.

It is part of the tutelary statues of Eherhe clan Agbon. The statues are two-tone black / white to symbolize the power of the ancestral figure. On the head, the character as well as the small lateral figures wear a headdress in the shape of a hat, symbol of their high rank. There is a thick layer of kaolin on the body and face. The lines, and in particular the mouth, strongly contrast by the addition of dark pigment. A small front door opens onto a tooth-shaped cavity in which traces of relics can be seen.

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Kuba cup
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba cup

Abundance of decorative carvings in African Kuba art.
The sides of the cup are decorated with a large frieze imbolo consisting of interlaced geometric patterns borrowed from scarification, also repeated on shoowa raffia textiles. Various forms of cups were carved whose ornamentation sought to glorify the qualities of their owners. Satin patina.
The extremely organized and hierarchical Kuba society placed at its center a king or nyim inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group.
This one was considered to be of divine origin. At the same time chief of the kingdom and of the Bushoong chieftaincy, he was attributed supernatural virtues stemming from sorcery or from the ancestors. He was therefore responsible for the survival of his subjects, whether it was through ...


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150.00

Kuduo Akan ceremonial pot from Ghana
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Can Kuduo

The Ashanti, Asante , mastered the art of lost wax cast iron, copper metal being sacred and considered inferior to gold, in order to produce ritual and prestige objects, such as the Kuduo brass which were intended, in addition to the storage of gold powder, for domestic and royal cults. Sacrifices and offerings were sometimes attributed to them. The stage on the lid of this kuduo evokes life at the court, musicians surround the king sheltered under the royal parasol kyiné, the latter being associated with the protective tree gyedua . The chief was accompanied by this umbrella in all his travels. The decorative motifs around the perimeter, however, are derived from Islamic traditions. Golden patina with grey-green inlays.

Ashanti are one of Ghana's ethnic groups (formerly Côte ...

Bronze Dogon Box
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze Dogon

Ex-collection of French African art.

The frequent representations of horsemen in the African art of the Dogon of Mali refer to their cosmogony and complex religious myths. One of the Nommos, ancestors of mankind, resurrected by the creator god Amma, descended to earth carried by an ark transformed into a horse. The walls are decorated with allegorical decorative motifs, such as friezes of wavelets and leaf patterns. The whole has a golden brown patina.
(Dogon, Huib Blom) The Dakar-Djibouti mission of 1931, led by Marcel Griaule, was charged to study in depth the rites of this population established in the cliffs region of Bandiagara. The Dogon would be composed of several peoples who had found refuge there following repeated droughts or invasions. This work was then ...


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Songye Divination Cup
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Songye Fetish

This cup from which sprang the bust of a fetiche nkishi songye was doomed to divinatory use. Various elements, shells, seeds, ossicles, frequently came to join the object. The magic charge bishimba was inserted into the cavity of the skull if the abdomen did not have it. Light brown patina coated with kaolin. Crack, erosion.

These protective fetishes for homes are among the most popular in Africa. Nkisi plays the role of mediator between gods and men. Large specimens are the collective property of an entire village, while smaller figures belong to an individual or family. In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle on the left bank of the Lualaba. Their society is organized in a patriarchal way. Their history is inseparable from that of the ...


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Kuba Lele sculpted cut
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba Cup

Among the prestigious objects, this cup with its contours carved with four faces in high relief and engraved with geometric motifs. The faces marked with scarification marks recall the features of the great Kuba royal masks. Matt surface coated with tukula pigments, red ochre.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the higher ranks of their society. Indeed, several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined designs including cups, drinking horns and beakers. The Lele are established in the west of the Kuba kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers. Intercultural exchanges between the Bushoong of the Kuba territory and the Lele have made the attribution of certain objects difficult, as both ...


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240.00

Chokwe anthropomorphic cup
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Tabatière Tschokwe

Equipped with its pestle, this tobacco mortar accompanied, among other uses, rituals for ajimu spirits requiring the use of smoke. The carved figures evoke female masks mwana pwo associated with fertility and fecundity. Shaded lustrous patina.
. Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwe were then subjected to the Lunda empire from which they inherited a new hierarchical system and the sacredness of power. Nevertheless, the Chokwe never fully adopted these new social and political contributions. Three centuries later, the Chokwe eventually took over the capital of the Lunda, which had been weakened by internal conflicts, thus contributing to the dismantling of the kingdom. The Chokwe did not have a centralized power but rather large chiefdoms. It was ...


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290.00





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