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African art - Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam:

Clay jars are closely associated with the daily life of African populations. Made from the material of muddy ponds and rivers, the rather heterogeneous paste allows the production of objects with thick walls such as jars. The jars, often made of wood, are intended to receive offerings, medicinal plants, or divinatory gris-gris.


Bura funerary urn
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Bura funerary urn

Remarkable, African Bura art includes three types of archaeological sites in the Niger Valley: sites with necropolises where coffin jars, funerary urns, etc ... Sites with ritual vocations where ceremonies were happening and the religious rites. The habitation sites where we find the usual objects. Herisse in his height of vertical lines composed of small circular reliefs, this conical receptacle was placed in the tomb of the deceased among personal effects like his weapons and clothing that he might need in the afterlife, among his bones and teeth. The piece has the same patterns placed horizontally around the perimeter of its lower base.


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Calyx Pende
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Calyx Pende

Cephalomorphic cup with a long handle, among the prestigious insignia of the Pende. The lower part of the face, as if swollen, gradually joins the neck. A discreet point is enough to indicate the chin. The upturned nose softens the sketchy features where small holes show teeth, pupils and nostrils. A hairstyle is outlined, disappearing behind the horseshoe ears.
Satin black brown patina. Erosions of use, crack of desication.

The Western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the Eastern settled on the banks of the Kasaï downstream from Tshikapa. The influences of neighboring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity, the Mbuya masks, realistic, produced every ten years, take ...


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250.00

Kuba cup
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba cup

Prestigious sculptures in African art kuba.
The anthropomorphic cut refers to a female ancestor. In the Kuba groups, a wide variety of carved cups with figurative motifs are intended to highlight the prestige of their holder. The character whose head is hollowed out here adopts compacted proportions.
Satin patina.


The extremely organized and hierarchical Kuba society placed a king or nyim at its center, inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group.
This was considered to be of divine origin. Both head of the kingdom and of the bushoong chiefdom, he was attributed supernatural virtues from witchcraft or ancestors. He therefore ensured the sustainability of his subjects, whether through harvests, rain or the birth of children. These magical attributes were ...


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240.00  190.00

Dogon pharmacopoeia box
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Dogon Box

This African art object, a box with two moving shutters, set on three feet, was probably designed to preserve active medicinal preparations prepared according to the advice of elders who had been introduced to the science of trees or . jiridon. The walls are carved with figures of mythical ancestors Nammos , geniuses associated with the creation of the world and guarantors of health and fertility. These are supposed to activate the healing power of the active ingredients. Brown patina.
The Dogons are a people renowned for their cosmogony, their esotericism, their myths and legends. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living southwest of the Niger Loop in mali's Mopti region (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest of ...


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Kuba cup
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba cup

The outline of this cephalomorphic cut is embellished with an imbolo frieze made up of geometric patterns referring to scarifications, also used on the shoowa raffia textiles. These different types of carved cups aim to enhance the prestige of their owners.
Satin abraded patina.

The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige items created for members of the high ranks of their society.
Particularly organized and hierarchical, it placed a king or nyim at its center, inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group.
This was considered to be of divine origin. Both head of the kingdom and of the bushoong chiefdom, he was attributed supernatural virtues from witchcraft or ancestors. He therefore ensured the sustainability of his subjects, whether through ...


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180.00

Bangubangu jar
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Bangubangu jar

A cap with a janiform sculpted motif, referring to the ancestors, is reminiscent here of Hemba statuary. The faces are framed with a diadem and a thin beard necklace. The walls decorated with figures in relief are linked to the worship of ancestors and the spirits of nature.
Glossy black patina. In eastern DRC Among the Bangubangu of Luba-Hemba origin, who were decimated by slavery, disease, armed conflict, and under the influence of Islam, statuary is rare. The land belongs to the different clans that make up their society. The main clan is the Bena Bago, under the aegis of a paramount chief named Mulohwe assisted by dignitaries. Each of the clans is headed by a "Sultani" chief. The secret society, Muyi has carved objects, including emblematic scepters belonging to the judges or ...


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380.00

Shi container
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Shi container

Sculpted pot whose thin walls are equipped with small handles for a carrying strap. Engraved patterns are faintly visible under the parallel striations of the collar. Velvety surface, brown patina with old xylophage imprints.

Settled on the shores and islands of Lake Kivu, the Bashi , Omushi , or even Banyabungu , form a Bantu group from the west, which came to mingle with the Lega, which the pastoral populations of Rwanda then joined. They live mainly from agriculture and cattle breeding. Cults of different origins are the basis of their religion. They venerate the souls of the dead: family ancestors, heroes, leaders. Although the groups in this region produce little sculpture, the Shi carved masks and a few objects associated with Lega rites. They are, however, ...


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280.00

Dogon box
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Dogon box

The iconic cups of African Dogon art
. Blacksmith artists Dogon form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim . Today they produce weapons, tools,and also work with wood. "Masters of fire", they are furthermore supposed to heal burns (Huib Blom). The Nommo, a protective ancestor evoked in different forms in Dogon iconography, is said to be an ancestor gifted with the ability to manifest himself in human or animal form, hence the frequent decorative motifs adorning the sculptures. The wavelet friezes are also symbolic. Greenish-gray patina. The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, myths and rituals. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living in the southwestern loop of the Niger in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near ...


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Lele container
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Lele container

Like their Kuba neighbours, the Lele have a wide variety of objects and sculptures of daily use, such as this spherical container, with spout, for milk or any other liquid. Dark matte patina, locally abraded.
Height on base: 16 cm.
The Lélé, neighbors of the Tschokwe and the Pende, live in the west of the Kuba kingdom and share common cultural specificities with the Bushoong of the Kuba country. Both groups adorn their prestige objects with similar motifs. Their society, headed by a "nymi" king, includes three classes, that of the Tundu or warlords, the Batshwa ("those who reject the Tundu authority") and the Wongo called by the name of the neighboring ethnic group. The ritual ceremonies are under the authority of the oldest, chiefs of each village who hold the secrets of ...


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280.00

Lulua pot
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Lulua pot

Monoxyle sculpture of a tobacco container, on the head of a female figure. The latter is depicted squatting on a conical base.
Black oiled patina.
Slightly missing at the base and cracks. It is in the south of the Democratic Republic of Congo that the Lulua , or Béna Lulua ,from West Africa settled. Lulua is a generic term, referring to a large number of heterogeneous peoples who populate the area near the Lulua River, between the Kasai and Sankuru Rivers. Their social structure, based on castes, is similar to that of the Luba. During the late 19th century, the Lulua culture underwent radical changes. In 1875, the Lulua king, Kalambam, introduced new social and religious rules, which ended the traditional consumption of palm wine and the ban on hemp ...


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Luba statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Luba statue

Seated figure facing a mboko container with a lid, which was usually filled with kaolin, a symbol of purity and of the spiritual world. These containers were used by different Luba societies, and groups of prophets, more generally by the mediums of the Kilumbu, Bilumbu divination society, or by the healers of the society. Buhabo . It was a question, individually or collectively, of consulting the spirits of the ancestors through specialists. This type of cut also played a role during the investiture of the Luba king.
According to P. Nooter, these figures also represented the wife of the diviner, which highlights its importance in the bilumbu divination process. According to some Luba however, although a woman, she would represent the first Luba diviner, and would also be an ...


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Luba Shankadi royal caryatid cup
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Luba cup

The figure acting as a caryatid here adopts an unusual posture revealing the most intimate parts of a very detailed anatomy. According to P. Nooter these figures represented the diviner's wife, emphasizing her importance in the process of divination bilumbu. She supports the mboko cup, a calabash that was filled with kaolin, symbolizing purity and the spiritual world, and with which the king's visitors smeared themselves out of respect.
The antelope unfolding at the top also forms a recurring symbolic motif in Luba iconography. Abrasions and desiccation cracks. Matt patina, residual inlays.

The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River, thus the name (Baluba, which ...

Coupe Agere Ifa Yoruba
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Yoruba Cup

In the Yoruba pantheon, Orunmila is the deity of the which is consulted in case of problems through the divination ifà via the soothsayer babalawo (iyanifà for a woman). Intended to stand on the altar of the god, this sculpture consists of a cup that contained the sacred palm nuts and a rider figure. The character would embody Esu or Elegba , divine messenger who unites orisa to men. Cracks on the pot.
Centrée on the veneration of her gods, or orisà, the religion yoruba relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages ( aroko). They are designed by sculptors at the request of followers, soothsayers and their clients. These spirits are supposed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the disappearance of the civilization Ifé ...


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Yoruba bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Yoruba bronze

Bronze depicting a high-ranking character, adorned with ornaments and with a face marked with vertical "kpélé" scarifications. A deep cup, with thin edges, surmounts his head.
Gray patina.
Yoruba society has several associations whose roles vary. While the male egbe society reinforces social norms, the aro unites the farmers. The gelede has more esoteric and religious aims. Notables come together in a society called esusu. Offering cups, some of which were used to store kola nuts or other gifts for visitors, were once placed in royal palaces in the Ekiti and Igbomina regions of Yoruba country. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose following the disappearance of the Ifé civilization and are still the basis of the political structure of the Yoruba . The Oyo created two ...


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Statue Koro
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Koro

Anthropomorphic sculpture composed of a figure of an ancestor in a frontal position whose abdomen forms a container for beer or palm wine during ritual ceremonies. The face, which appears helmeted, is unusual. Coated with a velvety black patina, a break in one arm had to be restored. Erosions. According to some authors, two people drank from it at the same time (Arts du Nigéria, A. Lebas). It was in the northern part of the Nigerian interior that the Koro settled, alongside the Waja, Mama, Hausa, and Dakakari. Mostly known for their masks decorated with red abrus seeds embodying the ancestors, they also use this type of ritual offering cups at funerals , during sacrifices and masked ceremonies.


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Dogon bronze ceremonial box
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Dogon box

The rider and his mount, symbols of power and wealth since they are rare, are a recurring theme in African art, particularly in Mali.

This ceremonial cup takes up the theme of the mythical ark in the Dogon genesis. Indeed, one of the Nommos , ancestors of the Dogon, resurrected by the creator god Amma , is said to have descended to earth carried by an ark metamorphosed into a horse. Ornamental motifs, such as wavelet friezes and references to the snake, adorn its contours.
Copper brown patina. The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, myths and legends. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living southwest of the Niger loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest ...

Dogon Ogo Banya Cup
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Dogon Cup

The emblematic cups of African Dogon art
Dogon pot for ceremonial use whose lid is decorated with the Hogon, a religious leader personified by the rider on his mount. Very fine linear motifs recall that the Nommo, mythical ancestor to whom the rider also refers, is a water god who taught weaving to humans(M. Buratti). Thick matte black patina, desiccation cracks. The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, myths and rituals. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living southwest of the Niger loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest of Ouahigouya). Their oldest religious leader, the Hogon, the highest authority of the Dogon people, paraded on his horse at the time of his enthronement ...


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Kongo Yombe carved box
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Yombe box

The lid of this container bears allegorical motifs, carved in the round, representing three figures including a maternity hospital sitting on a log. Desiccation cracks and abrasions.
The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombé were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rites, in particular by means of sculpted fetishes. The naturalistic art of the Bayombe, in addition to masks and nkisi fetishes , includes prestigious sculptures and objects associated with the Lemba cult, glorifying harmony and married life.
In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads of the borders between the current DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the ...


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Bangwa statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bangwa statue

The rich production of African art among the populations of the Cameroonian Grassland is illustrated mainly by wood statuary: commemorative sculptures of kings, queens, princesses and titled servants, as well as the parents of twins.

Within the large Bamileke tribe in western Cameroon, the Bangwa constitute a small kingdom. The influence of the Bamileke on bangwa statuary is notable by relatively comparable facial features and morphology. This Bangwa figure, whose hollow abdomen acts as a receptacle, honors fertility. Ocher agglomerates line the internal walls of the cup.
Thick cracked patina, desiccation cracks and native restoration.

Typical of the Bamileke country, the Bangwa statues often represent fertility but also power and ...


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Ganda milk jug
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Ganda container

Sober and refined, with thin walls, this ancient container from East Africa was designed by a nomadic people. The latter was particularly decimated by the Islamic slave trade and by recurring internal wars. The groups of populations called "Bantu interlacustres", located between Lake Victoria and the Limpopo river, include the Ganda , Nyoro, Nkole, Soga, Toro, Hima, and the Tutsi of Rwanda and Burundi. Their cultures have similarities, like their artistic production and their objects of daily use. Apart from the prestigious vases created by the potter in the service of the king, named kujona , the Ganda of Uganda also produce containers for daily use, such as this object patinated by use.
Satin patina, abrasions and small accidents.


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280.00

Large Luba lid container
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Pot Luba

The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neck-bearings and stools made up of a cariatidic figure. They also carved containers of different kinds. The chef's ritual objects, charms and other fetishes, were stored in this type of large cephalomorphic container with a lid. Fully hollowed out, this sculpture consists of a spherical volume depicting a head whose headdress forms the neck. A rope holds the lid on the side handles. Medium brown patina very slightly abraded. Height on a base: 54 cm.

The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is the Katanga, specifically the region of the Lubu River, hence the name (Baluba, which means the Lubas). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of ...


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