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African art - Jar:

Clay jars are closely associated with the daily life of African populations. Made from the material of muddy ponds and rivers, the rather heterogeneous paste allows the production of objects with thick walls such as jars. The jars, often made of wood, are intended to receive offerings, medicinal plants, or divinatory gris-gris.


Ganda milk pot
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Ganda milk pot

Decorated with a frieze of parallel grooves and diamonds, this ancient container from East Africa was designed by a nomadic people. The latter was particularly decimated by the Islamic slave trade and by recurrent infighting. Population groups called "Bantous interlacustres", located between Lake Victoria and the Limpopo River, include the Ganda , Nyoro, Nkole, Soga, Toro, Hima, and the Tutsi of Rwanda and Burundi. Their cultures have similarities, as do their artistic production and their everyday objects.
Apart from the prestigious vases created by the potter in the service of the king, named kujona , The Ganda of Uganda also produce containers for everyday use, such as this object patinated by use and equipped with a woven lid. Desication crack.


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250.00

Yombe Box
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Yombe Box

African sculpture depicting a woman sitting cross-legged. She embodies the ancestor associated with fertility cults. It forms the lid of a small box.
A subgroup of the Kongo ethnic group, the Yombe, established on the west African coast, in the southwest of the Republic of Congo and in Angola, are characterized by a statuary in which various maternity figures abound. The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombé were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rites by means of sculpted nkondo nkisi fetishes.

Matte brown patina.

Ref. : “Maternity in black African art” Massa; “Tribal Art of Black Africa” Bacquart.


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180.00

Dogon Altar
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Dogon Altar

Private African art collection.
Harvested in the 1950s by Monsieur Arnaud, accompanying Alain Bilot,
renowned collector of Dogon art during study stays in Mali.

Four figures of ancestors or chiefs of lineage, whose feet disappear in a circular tray symbolizing the axis of the world, support a hollowed out cup. The latter is slightly off-center. The hands of the figures rest on their knees, and two of them wear masks. Scabby deposits bear witness to libatory rites. Rough, crusty surface.
Sculpted for the most part on commission by a family, Dogon statues can ...


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350.00

Yoruba Jar
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Yoruba Jar

This container, which closes with a lid with anthropomorphic motifs, was linked to the Ifa cult created by the Oyo of Nigeria, in relation to the Egungun and Sango societies. The flutists recall Esu/Elegba, messenger and master of the crossroads.
Used for divination by the priest of Ifa, this pot is decorated with subjects symbolizing various deities or orishas.
Matte patina. Erosions, old restoration (wicker link).
The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwest Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name of Nago. They are patrilineal, practice excision and circumcision. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the disappearance of the Ifé civilization and are still the basis of the political structure of the Yoruba . The Oyo ...


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380.00

Boa container
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Boa container

Vase with a neck showing a human head with large ears. Sets of incised motifs decorate the sides, which show female attributes. Brown slip with reddish glints. Abrasions. Related to the Mangbetu and Zande, the Boa inhabit the savannah in the north of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Their anthropomorphic figures were undoubtedly used as part of rites charged with combating the witchcraft of the ndoki society. They are known for their mask with oversized ears, perforated like the ear pavilions of the Eastern Boa, the "bavobongo ". It gave an impressive appearance to its wearer, accentuated by the contrast of colors. The African art mask kpongadomba of the Boa was ordered by the chief kumu who offered it to the most valiant warrior. It was then kept in the hut of his wife. Some ...


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190.00

Pottery Zande
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Pottery Zande

Ex Italian African tribal art collection.
Vase whose neck features a human head with large pierced ears. A double frieze of geometrical patterns is printed on the sides.
Formerly referred to as " Niam-Niam " because they were considered anthropophagous, the tribes grouped under the name Zande , Azandé , came from Chad to settle on the border of the D.R.C. (Zaire), Sudan and the Central African Republic. According to their beliefs, man is endowed with two souls, one of which is transformed upon his death into the animal-totem of the clan to which he belongs. The African tribal art of the Zande, or "those who own a lot of land", apart from their court art composed of spoons, receptacles, pipes and harps, counts two types of statues : Kudu statues between 30 and 50 cm high ...


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280.00

Luena jar
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Luena jar

Jar with a human figurative motif, adorned with a juxtaposition of checkerboards, and a face on which are inscribed the traditional scarifications formerly in use among the Lwena.
Dark brown slip.
Of Lunda origin, the Lwena (or even Lovale , or Luvale ) emigrated from Angola to Zaire in the 19th century, pushed back by the Chokwe. Some became slave traders, others, the Lovales, found refuge in Zambia and near the Zambezi in Angola. Their society is matrilineal, exogamous and polygamous. The Lwena have become known for their honey-colored sculptures, embodying figures of deceased ancestors and chiefs, and their masks linked to the initiation rites of the mukanda.


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240.00

Kongo Box
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kongo Box

African statuette enclosing the abdominal cavity into which magical ingredients were introduced. The subject forms the lid of a small box. Matte brown patina, drying crack..
A clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the west African coast, in the southwest of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternity wards. The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, led by king ntotela . Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary with codified gestures in relation to their vision of the world.

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Kuba urn
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba urn

Prestigious Kuba-type vase, engraved with traditional frieze patterns, and carved with miniatures representing masks and turtles. Pretty satin patina. Desication cracks.
The Kuba and the tribes established between the Sankuru and Kasai rivers, including the Bushoong and Dengese also originating from the Mongo group, are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the high ranks of their society. Several Kuba groups indeed produced anthropomorphic ceremonial objects with refined designs including cups, drinking horns and goblets. The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the Bushoong, who are still ruled by a king today. It is the most prolific group in Western Kasai. Ritual ceremonies remained an opportunity to display decorative arts and ...


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120.00

Kuba Jar
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba Jar

Among the prestigious objects of the Kuba groups, this beer container with a handle engraved with geometric patterns. The walls and bottom are thick. Satin black patina. Minor cracks.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the high ranks of their society. Several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined designs including cups, drinking horns and goblets. The Lele are established in the west of the Kuba kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers. Intercultural exchanges between the Bushoong of Kuba territory and the Lele have made the attribution of certain objects difficult, because the two groups use the same iconography, composed of faces with elaborate hairstyles and geometric decorative motifs.


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120.00

Chokwe Jar
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Chokwe Jar

Among the African regalia, this prestigious sculpture, a deep cut forming the headdress of a kneeling subject, invokes the protection of the spirits of the ancestors thanks to its iconography. Native restorations. Speckled brown patina. Desication cracks.
The Tschokwe, of Bantu culture, had settled in eastern Angola, but also in Congo and Zambia. Following various alliances, they mixed with the Lunda who taught them hunting. Their social organization also rubbed off on Tschokwe society. The Tschokwe however ended up dominating over the Lunda whose kingdom was dismantled at the end of the 19th century. Elephants in the region were hunted for meat, but also for ivory which was for sale and not the wide range of prestige items at which they excelled. The Tschokwe also participated ...


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120.00

Yoruba Urn
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Yoruba Urn

Ritual cups in traditional African art of Nigeria. Offering cups, some of which were used to hold kola nuts or other gifts for visitors, were once placed in the royal palaces of the Ekiti and Igbomina regions of Yorubaland. The Yoruba religion is based on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). These spirits are believed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare.
Some subjects also represent flautists in reference to certain deities associated with divination.
Within the Yoruba pantheon, Orunmila is the "orisa" deity who is consulted in case of problem through ifà divination thanks to the diviner babalawo (iyanifà for a woman). Matte patina, abrasions, old restoration (wicker).
(source: “Yoruba”, B.Lawal, 5 continents)


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390.00

Sundi Box
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Sundi Box

Rare figurative box describing a childbirth scene. This type of sculpture had a didactic function. Matte patina, cracking, old restoration. Presence of resin inside. The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, led by King Ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary and prestigious objects equipped with codified gestures in relation to their vision of the world. A clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the west African coast, in the southwest of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. The Yombe decorated their textiles, mats and loincloths, with diamonds in relation to proverbs ...


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240.00

Kuba Cup
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba Cup

Like their Kuba neighbours, the Lele have a wide variety of ceremonial sculptures, such as this cup with many carefully engraved details, used during divination rites, pacts and ritual ceremonies. Satin black patina, minor chips.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige items created for members of the high ranks of their society. Several Kuba groups indeed produced anthropomorphic objects with refined motifs including cups, drinking horns and goblets. The Lele are established in the west of the Kuba kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers. The intercultural exchanges between the Bushoong of the Kuba territory and the Lele have made the attribution of certain objects difficult, because the two groups use the same iconography, composed of faces with ...


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120.00

Lele cup
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Lele cup

Among the prestigious objects of the Kuba groups, this cephalomorphic cup decorated with geometric motifs has a handle. Shiny patina. Damaged upper contours. Desiccation crack.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the higher ranks of their society. Indeed, several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined designs including cups, drinking horns and beakers. The Lele are established in the west of the Kuba kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers. Intercultural exchanges between the Bushoong of the Kuba territory and the Lele have made the attribution of certain objects difficult, as both groups use the same iconography, composed of faces with elaborate hairstyles and geometric decorative ...


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120.00

Lele container
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Lele container

Like their Kuba neighbours, the Lele have a wide variety of objects and sculptures of daily use, such as this spherical container, with spout, for milk or any other liquid. Dark matte patina, locally abraded.
Height on base: 16 cm.
The Lélé, neighbors of the Tschokwe and the Pende, live in the west of the Kuba kingdom and share common cultural specificities with the Bushoong of the Kuba country. Both groups adorn their prestige objects with similar motifs. Their society, headed by a "nymi" king, includes three classes, that of the Tundu or warlords, the Batshwa ("those who reject the Tundu authority") and the Wongo called by the name of the neighboring ethnic group. The ritual ceremonies are under the authority of the oldest, chiefs of each village who hold the secrets of ...


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180.00

Koro Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Koro Statuette

Female statuette whose abdomen would form a container for beer or palm wine, administered during ritual ceremonies. The nose extends with a sagittal crest like a helmet. Two-tone grainy patina. Desiccation cracks.
It is in the northern part of the interior of Nigeria that the Koro settled, alongside the Waja, Mama, Hausa, and Dakakari. Especially famous for their masks decorated with red abrus seeds embodying the ancestors, they also use this type of cup for ritual offerings during funerals, during sacrifices and masked ceremonies.


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160.00

Bashi container
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Bashi container

Utility object of the Bashi or Shi, from the Democratic Republic of Congo.
The specificity of this drinking cup, or beverage jug, lies in the unusual diamond shape of its base and its neck, its open handle and its modest decoration engraved in a frieze.
Satin patina, small erosions.
Installed in the east of the DRC, on the shores and islands of Lake Kivu, the Bashi, Omushi (sing.: mu-shi), or even Banyabungu, form a Bantu group from the west, with which they came to mingle of the Lega, which pastoral populations from Rwanda then joined. They live mainly from agriculture and livestock breeding.


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180.00

Soninké Box
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Soninké Box

Harvested in Mali by Jacques Anquetil, weaver and author of "Black Africa", published by Dessain and Tolra, this geometrically shaped wooden container was designed by the Soninke to store indigo vegetable dye or other make-up (made from the indigo plant), with which the fabrics were colored (such as the sails of the Tuaregs). Crystallized residues, blue and green in color, line the bottom of the container. Patina of use nuanced with browns, small accidents. -Jacques Anquetil, theater man who became master weaver initiated among the Dogon, president of the Métiers d' French art, author of "Africa, the hands of the world" at Solar editions and "Black Africa" at ed. Dessain and Tolra, and "The Hands of the World" by

Kharal Bowl
African art > Art of the world > Kharal Bowl

Singular object of oblong shape intended for pouring opium water, the tip pierced throughout its length forming a neck. It is a social accessory used during ceremonies welcoming guests of the same caste, in Pakistan and northern India. Beautiful glossy patina of use. For more information: "Drinking opium, a ritual of hospitality in northern India" Sandrine Prévot.


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190.00

Zigua Calabash
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Zigua Calabash

French collection of African tribal art. Small used medicine receptacle, made of a dried gourd whose wooden cap represents a head. Abrasions and cracks. This piece of tribal artcomes from the northeastern region of Tanzania, bordering Kenya, facing the Indian Ocean, where the Paré, Shamba, Zigua, and Mbugu tribes live. A relative homogeneity characterizes the productions of these groups, recalling some of the Malagasy and Bataks with whom, via maritime trade, contact could once have been established. Among the Zigua, sculptures served as an initiation support for educational purposes.


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150.00





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