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African art - Jar:

Clay jars are closely associated with the daily life of African populations. Made from the material of muddy ponds and rivers, the rather heterogeneous paste allows the production of objects with thick walls such as jars. The jars, often made of wood, are intended to receive offerings, medicinal plants, or divinatory gris-gris.


Zigua Calabash
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Zigua Calabash

French collection of African tribal art. Small used medicine receptacle, made of a dried gourd whose wooden cap represents a head. Abrasions and cracks. This piece of tribal artcomes from the northeastern region of Tanzania, bordering Kenya, facing the Indian Ocean, where the Paré, Shamba, Zigua, and Mbugu tribes live. A relative homogeneity characterizes the productions of these groups, recalling some of the Malagasy and Bataks with whom, via maritime trade, contact could once have been established. Among the Zigua, sculptures served as an initiation support for educational purposes.


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150.00

Kuba cup
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba cup

Abundance of decorative carvings in African Kuba art.
The sides of the cup are decorated with a large frieze imbolo consisting of interlaced geometric patterns borrowed from scarification, also repeated on shoowa raffia textiles. Various forms of cups were carved whose ornamentation sought to glorify the qualities of their owners. Satin patina.
The extremely organized and hierarchical Kuba society placed at its center a king or nyim inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group.
This one was considered to be of divine origin. At the same time chief of the kingdom and of the Bushoong chieftaincy, he was attributed supernatural virtues stemming from sorcery or from the ancestors. He was therefore responsible for the survival of his subjects, whether it was through ...


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150.00

Rwanda Jar
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Rwanda Jar

Encrusted with shards of brass making up a decorative frieze, this ancient container from East Africa was designed by a nomadic people. The latter was particularly decimated by the Islamic slave trade and by recurrent internecine wars. The population groups called "Bantous interlacustres", located between Lake Victoria and the Limpopo River, include the Ganda, Nyoro, Nkole, Soga, Toro, Hima, and the Tutsi of Rwanda and Burundi. Their cultures have similarities, like their artistic production and their objects of daily use. The Tutsi raise cattle. They excel in the art of weaving and basketry. This spherical pot with a small horizontal handle has smooth walls and slight abrasions (Shard on the edge).


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290.00

Kongo Pottery
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kongo Pottery

Collection of Belgian African art
Used daily and during divination rites, pacts, ritual ceremonies, this container offers curved sides highlighted by a large frieze. Slight chips on the edges. Dark, smooth slip. Satin black patina, minor chips.


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245.00

Yoruba Box
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Yoruba Box

Intended to sit on the ceremonial altar, this ritual cup whose support represents a bird is formed from a container which housed the sacred palm nuts.
Erosions, cracks. Slightly polychrome matte patina.
Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, the Yoruba religion is based on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). They are designed by sculptors at the request of followers, diviners and their clients. These spirits are believed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the disappearance of the Ifé civilization and are still the basis of the political structure of the Yoruba . The Oyo created two cults centered on the Egungun and Sango societies, still active, who worship their gods, the Orisa, through ...


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390.00

Bangubangu jar
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Bangubangu jar

A cap with a janiform sculpted motif, referring to the ancestors, is reminiscent here of Hemba statuary. The faces are framed with a diadem and a thin beard necklace. The walls decorated with figures in relief are linked to the worship of ancestors and the spirits of nature.
Glossy black patina. In eastern DRC Among the Bangubangu of Luba-Hemba origin, who were decimated by slavery, disease, armed conflict, and under the influence of Islam, statuary is rare. The land belongs to the different clans that make up their society. The main clan is the Bena Bago, under the aegis of a paramount chief named Mulohwe assisted by dignitaries. Each of the clans is headed by a "Sultani" chief. The secret society, Muyi has carved objects, including emblematic scepters belonging to the judges or ...


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280.00

Bamileke Horn
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Bamileke Horn

Among the Bamiléké as in other ethnic groups, objects of African art testified to the place of their owner in society. The materials and shapes of objects varied according to social status. This palm wine cup was used by notables to conclude agreements during ritual ceremonies.
Located in the border region of Nigeria, the North-West province of Cameroon, Grassland is made up of several ethnic groups: Tikar, Anyang, Widekum, Chamba, Bamoun and Bamileke. Several centralized chiefdoms, or kingdoms, based on customary associations and secret societies, were organized around the Fon, which would have broad powers.


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180.00

Yoruba Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba Statue

Cupbearers in traditional African art from Nigeria.
The priestess, cheeks marked with scarifications in three vertical "kpélé" claws, kneeling, presenting a lidded cup, in the shape of a bird, intended for offerings or divination. The subject's facial and bodily scarifications seek not only to enhance physical beauty, but also to identify the rank or origin of its bearer. Body marks could be permanent or temporary, such as tattoos made from the juice of insects or plants, especially for court dignitaries or the king himself. The Yoruba religion is based on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). These spirits are said to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare.
Matte patina. Erosions, kaolin residues. Desication cracks.
Offering cups, some of which were used ...


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490.00

Tabwa Vase
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Tabwa Vase

Mipasi ancestor figure of African tribal art whose face bears the facial scarifications of the Batabwa clans. This prestigious object serves as a palm wine cup dedicated to ceremonial rites.
Smooth black patina, reddish reflections. Minor erosions.
In the South-East of the DRC, around Lake Tanganyika, simple farmers without centralized power, the Tabwa, federated around tribal chiefs after coming under the influence of the Luba. It was mainly during this period that their artistic current was expressed mainly through statues but also masks. The Tabwa practiced ancestor worship to which they dedicated some of their statues. Animists, their beliefs are anchored around the ngulu, spirits of nature present in plants and rocks.


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250.00

Calyx Pende
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Calyx Pende

Cephalomorphic cup with a long handle, among the prestigious insignia of the Pende. The lower part of the face, as if swollen, gradually joins the neck. A discreet point is enough to indicate the chin. The upturned nose softens the sketchy features where small holes show teeth, pupils and nostrils. A hairstyle is outlined, disappearing behind the horseshoe ears.
Satin black brown patina. Erosions of use, crack of desication.

The Western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the Eastern settled on the banks of the Kasaï downstream from Tshikapa. The influences of neighboring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity, the Mbuya masks, realistic, produced every ten years, take ...


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170.00

Djenne Vase
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Djenne Vase

Ex-Belgian African art collection.
A very sober Djenne-type container, whose orange-pink slip shines through despite the abrasion of the surface. Perforation on the base. As the old Djenne sites are all in a flood zone, artifacts emerge when the waters recede, with locals sometimes discovering them by chance.
In the Mali Empire, terracotta sculptures with red engobe had a funerary connotation.


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190.00

Luba Cut
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Luba Cut

Cylindrical container mboko intended for kaolin in relation to purity and the spiritual world. These containers were used by different Luba societies, and groups of prophets, more generally by the mediums of the Kilumbu, Bilumbu divination society, or by the healers of the society. Buhabo . It was a question, individually or collectively, of consulting the spirits of the ancestors through specialists. Matte patina, abrasions.

The Lubas (Baluba in Chiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River, thus the name (Baluba "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of Ilunga Kalala who killed the old king Kongolo who has since been revered in the form of a python. In ...


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290.00

Yoruba Sculpture
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba Sculpture

Sculpture depicting subjects surrounding a lidded receptacle intended for votive offerings, gifts for visitors, or even divination. Sculptures of this type decorated the palaces of the Yoruba country. The characters evoke minor gods or ancestors.
Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà , the Yoruba religion is based on artistic sculptures with coded messages ( aroko ). These spirits are believed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare.
Linear scarifications mark the faces of the figures in order not only to increase their physical beauty, but also to identify the rank or origin of their bearer. Body marks could be permanent or temporary, such as tattoos made from the juice of insects or plants, especially for court dignitaries or the king himself. Grainy matte ...


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380.00

Fang Reliquary
African art > Reliquaries, statues > Fang Reliquary

br>Belonging to a Fang lineage, this receptacle with high cylindrical bark walls is now devoid of ancestor relics. The carefully detailed male figure symbolizes the latter. A second, noticeably different subject adorns the outer wall. Patina of use. Among the Fang of Cameroon and those of Gabon, each family has a "Byeri", or reliquary box, in which the bones of the ancestors are kept. These boxes were guarded by the oldest man in the village, the "esa". The reliquary boxes were surmounted by a statue or a head which acted as guardian of the "byeri" boxes. These, intended to deflect evil influences, were kept in the hut. They were also used during initiation ceremonies for young people linked to the "So" society. During festivals, the statues could be separated from their boxes and ...


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490.00

Ceramic Djenne pot
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Ceramic Djenne pot

Ex-Belgian African art collection.
Container of great sobriety of the Djenne type, whose orange slip shows through under a thin beige film. The edges of the neck are slightly damaged.
As the old Djenne sites are all in a flood zone, deeds emerge when the waters recede, the inhabitants sometimes discovering them by chance.
In the Mali Empire, terracotta sculptures with red engobe had a funerary connotation.


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180.00

Tschokwe Pot
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Tschokwe Pot

Inspired by Portuguese Baroque, this chokwe tobacco pot offers a baluster foot made up of layered elements. It is crafted from checkered alveoli lined with volutes. These regal sculptures travelled with the court and were sometimes offered to other chefs. Tobacco use was indeed widespread among the Chokwe, and smoke was an integral part of offerings to the spirits ajimu. Use patina, cracks and abrasions of pigments.

Paisiblely settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwé were then subjected to the Lunda empire from which they inherited a new hierarchical system and the sanctity of power. Nevertheless, the Chokwé never fully embraced these new social and political contributions. Three centuries later, they eventually seized the capital of the Lunda, weakened by ...


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290.00

Kuba Jar
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba Jar

Different forms of cups with similar designs aimed at glorifying the qualities of their owners were carved by the Kuba groups. The kneeling subject here wears conventional body and facial scarifications. Lustrous brown-black patina, abrasions and desication cracks.

The Kuba and the tribes established between the Sankuru and Kasai rivers, including the Bushoong and Dengese also originating from the Mongo group, are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the high ranks of their society. Several Kuba groups indeed produced anthropomorphic ceremonial objects with refined motifs, including palm wine cups or poison oracles, drinking horns and goblets. The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the Bushoong, who are still ruled by a king today. ...


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280.00

Luba Cup
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Luba Cup

Figures embodying spirits, carved in the round, frame a cylindrical mboko container. This pot was for kaolin, associated with purity and the spiritual world. These vessels were used by various Luba societies, and groups of prophets, more generally by the mediums of the divination society Kilumbu , Bilumbu , or by the healers of the society Buhabo . It was, individually or collectively, to consult the spirits of the ancestors through specialists. This type of cup also played a role during the investiture of the Luba king.
Satin patina, cracks of desiccation.

The Lubas (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, thus the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a ...


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390.00

Kuba cup
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba cup

This cephalomorphic cup was intended for palm oil. In the kuba groups, a wide variety of these sculptures with figurative motifs are intended to enhance the prestige of their bearer. The edges are fine and regular.
Velvety patina.


The extremely organized and hierarchical Kuba society placed a king or nyim at its center, inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group.
This was considered to be of divine origin. Both head of the kingdom and of the bushoong chiefdom, he was attributed supernatural virtues from witchcraft or ancestors. He therefore ensured the sustainability of his subjects, whether through harvests, rain or the birth of children. These magical attributes were not hereditary, however, as the king was elected by a council.
Source: Kuba, ed. ...


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170.00

Ganda Container
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Ganda Container

Ex-Belgian African art collection
Sober and refined, with thin walls, this ancient container from East Africa was designed by a nomadic people. The latter was particularly decimated by the Islamic slave trade and by recurrent internecine wars. The population groups called "Bantous interlacustres", located between Lake Victoria and the Limpopo River, include the Ganda, Nyoro, Nkole, Soga, Toro, Hima, and the Tutsi of Rwanda and Burundi. Their cultures have similarities, like their artistic production and their objects of daily use. Apart from the prestigious vases created by the potter in the service of the king, named kujona, the Ganda of Uganda also produce vessels for daily use, such as this object patinated by use.
Satin patina, abrasions and small accidents.


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280.00

Koro Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Koro Statuette

Male figure whose abdomen has a hollowed-out shape. This object was intended for beer or palm wine administered during ritual ceremonies. The bust is incised with geometric patterns. The face is streaked with traditional ethnic marks.
Irregular satin patina.
It is in the northern part of the interior of Nigeria that the Koro settled, alongside the Waja, Mama, Hausa, and Dakakari. Especially renowned for their masks adorned with red abrus seeds embodying the ancestors, they also use this type of cup for ritual offerings during funerals or during sacrifices. Some of these sculptures formed double cups for shared use.


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120.00





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