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African art - Mask:

The African mask is without question and with force, what it represents, what it embodies. It can be an ancestor, a spirit, etc. .... This is the reason why African masks are treated like humans, they are fed with offerings, they have personal sanctuaries. Most African masks are made to dance. Fang, Punu, Baule, Lega, monochrome or polychrome, zoomorphic, anthropomorphic or even hybrid, coated with kaolin, raw or with a sacrificial patina, they are linked to ritual cults, with various functions (agriculture, initiation, funerals, enthronement etc...). Some have a social, legal, police or peacemaking role.


Fang Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Fang Mask

Ex. French collection of African Art Fang.
Formerly intended to unmask sorcerers, this African mask of the fang type, of which here is a rounded and sober version, was cut on the eve of the ceremonies. It is out of the sight of lay people that, accompanied by words, gestures, dances and sacrifices, he also intervened during initiations. Abraded matte patina. Erosions and desiccation cracks.
Among the Fang, established in a region extending from Yaoundé in Cameroon to Ogooué in Gabon, the appearance of these masks generally coated with kaolin (the white color evokes the power of the ancestors), in the middle of the night, could cause fear. This type of mask was used by the Ngil religious and judicial male society which no longer exists today. This secret society was ...


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190.00

Pende Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Pende Mask

The African mask inspired by the panya ngombe style is closely linked, according to the Pende, to the symbolism of the wild buffalo. The most imposing examples were designed to adorn the spaces reserved for the chief in the hut. Triangular in shape, this mask has stretched eyelids and inclined ears which accentuate its "V" appearance. Triangular decorative motifs appear as a distinct recurrence in the creations sculpted by Pende artists. Matte dark patina, abrasions. Height on base: 30 cm.
The Western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the Easterners have established themselves on the banks of the Kasai downstream of Tshikapa. The influences of neighboring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu are imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. ...


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450.00

Ekoi Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Ekoi Mask

Worn on the head as a crest, the African masks of Nigeria.
Ideal of feminine beauty among the Ejagham, the extravagant hairstyle composed of four volute outgrowths, trimmed with leather and removable, represents the hair extensions of young girls at the end of their period of initiatory seclusion. The whole thing has been coated with oil, the brown patina being like ice. The dancer's costume was made up of a large latticework of raffia cords, and, more recently, cotton fabric. The masks were coated with palm oil before use, and placed in daylight so that the leather softened and took on a satisfactory luster. Leopard societies, such as the Kpe male society, Ngbe among the Aro, used this model of crests for initiation ceremonies or funerals of members of the association, but ...


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450.00

Ci wara Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Ci wara Mask

African art and the founding myths of Bambara
In central and southern Mali, this abstract sculpture symbolizes the horse-antelope Ciwara ("wild beast of the earth") which, for the Bambara, Bamana " or "unbelievers", as the Muslims called them, would have taught agriculture to the man. She would also have offered him the first cereal. The crest mask is attached by ties to a deep hat in basketwork stretched with canvas and extended with raffia. Matte brown patina.
Worn on the top of the head, these crests accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tòn, an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks roamed the field by leaping in order to drive out the nyama, evil scents, and to detect any danger, or to flush out the evil spirits that could delight the soul of ...


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480.00

Lwena Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Lwena Mask

This African mask evoking a young woman was worn during the closing ceremonies of the Mukanda initiation. This mask was supposed to promote hunting, fertility, and harvests. Dark reddish-brown patina. Chips and abrasions.
Of Lunda origin, the Lwena (or even Lovale, or Luvale) emigrated from Angola to Zaire in the 19th century, pushed back by the Chokwe. Some became slave traders, others, the Lovale, found refuge in Zambia and near the Zambezi in Angola. Their society is matrilineal, exogamous and polygamous. The Lwena became known for their honey-colored sculptures, embodying figures of deceased ancestors and chiefs, and their masks linked to the initiation rites of mukanda. This mask is engraved with circular patterns associated with ethnic scarifications. These details ...


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140.00

Luvale mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Luvale mask

This African mask depicting the face of a young woman wearing a hemispherical headdress was worn at the top of the head during the closing ceremonies of the Mukanda initiation. It was supposed to promote hunting, fertility, and harvests.
Slight losses and drying crack.
Abrasive matte patina, crusty residue.
Of Lunda origin, the Lwena (or even Lovale , or Luvale ) emigrated from Angola to Zaire in the 19th century, pushed back by the Chokwe. Some became slave traders, others, the Lovales, found refuge in Zambia and near the Zambezi in Angola. Their society is matrilineal, exogamous and polygamous. The Lwena have become known for their honey-colored sculptures, embodying figures of deceased ancestors and chiefs, and their masks linked to the initiation ...


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140.00

Lega Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Lega Mask

African Lega sculptures in African art. This mask, which was not intended to be worn, but manipulated during rituals, indicated the stage that its holder had reached within theBwami, a learning society made up of different grades, and that joined the wives whose spouse had reached the third level, that of ngandu.
Within the Léga, the society of Bwami open to men and women, organized social and political life. There were up to seven levels of initiation, each associated with emblems. Following Social recognition and authority also had to be earned individually: the leader owed his selection to his heart (mutima), good character, intelligence, and impeccable behavior. During ritual ceremonies, Idumu masks, collectively owned, were presented to initiates ...


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280.00

Lele Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Lele Mask

In the category of flat surface masks, this Lele mask wears an elaborate balaclava hat and beard embroidered with beads, cowrie shells, fringed with horsehair or feathers. Glossy black patina.
The Lélé, neighbors of the Tschokwe and the Pende, live to the west of the Kuba kingdom and share specific characteristics cultural common with the Bushoong of the Kuba country. Both groups adorn their prestige objects with similar motifs. Their society, led by a king "nymi", includes three classes, that of the Tundu or war chiefs, the Batshwa ("those who reject the Tundu authority") and the Wongo called from the name of the neighboring ethnic group. The ritual ceremonies are under the authority of the oldest, chiefs of each village who hold the secrets of medicinal plants. These ...


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380.00

Boa Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Boa Mask

Example of an African kpongadomba or "Pongdudu" mask, flanked by unusual ears. Supposed to make one invulnerable, this kpongadomba African art mask of the Boa was ordered by the kumu chief who offered it to the most valiant warrior. It was then kept in his wife's hut. The ear flaps of the Eastern Boa were once perforated. The "bavobongo" has a mouth filled with teeth often represented by sticks, and gave an impressive appearance to its wearer, accentuated by the contrast of colors. Matte grainy patina, abraded. Height on base: 44 cm.
Close to the Mangbetu and the Zande, the Boa inhabit the savannah in the north of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Some Boa would have used these masks for educational purposes with children, since the pacification of the Uele region.


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380.00

Lega mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Lega mask

Ex-Swiss African art collection.
Shallow, stretched surface, on which are dug arches in the heart. The protrusion of the eyelids forms a hallucinated look and the gaping of the mouth an expression of amazement. This African Lega mask adopts recurring aesthetic criteria. Yet it offers checkered keloids, evoking some of the traditional motifs of which the faces were scarred. Residual, crusty, white clay inlays. This African Lega mask indicated the stage that its holder had reached within the Bwami, a learning society composed of different ranks, and which was joined by the wives whose spouse had reached the third level, that of the ngandu . Two-coloured skate abrasée.br / Within the Léga, the society of the Bwami open to men and women, organized social and political life. There were ...


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180.00

Fang Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Fang Mask

A voluminous mask forming a mutation of the Fang Ngil mask, this African mask of the Bikereu type caricatures a European settler. These masks appeared after the colonizing government banned the Ngil mask of justice, but have a similar function.
Abraded matte patina, drying cracks, minor chips.
Among the Fang, the male brotherhood of Ngil had the main task of fighting against sorcerers and evildoers. These masks were also worn for the initiation of its new members. Their white color, a reference to the deceased, means that the mask embodied an ancestral spirit. The mask has forbidding features, meant to surprise, accompanied by numerous acolytes at nightfall, in the light of torches.


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280.00

Guro mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Guro mask

Mask represented topped with an amulet like those that women inserted in their hair. It was used with Zamble and Zaouli, but is no longer used today. ("Guro", ed. 5Continents, pl.13) Numerous erosions.
Among the Mande group in the south, in central Côte d'Ivoire, on the banks of the Bandama, the Gouro are organized into lineages, and are the western neighbors of the Baoulé who have borrowed several features of their African tribal art creations. Animists, they have used since the 1950s a family of masks associated with the Zaouli dance. Indeed like the African Goli masks of the Baule, the set of Guro masks, relating to the genies of nature, comes in two zoomorphic masks followed by a third anthropomorphic one, which is considered the wife of the zamblé mask, the Gu. Priest ...


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280.00

Pende Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Pende Mask

Belgian collection of African art
African Pende Mbangu "disease" masks, also known as Bwala-Bwala, exaggerately depict the symptoms of illnesses such as epilepsy or facial paralysis, often attributed to rituals of witchcraft. These comedy masks are worn by dancers wearing hats decorated with guinea fowl, coucal or turaco feathers, or sometimes lumbandu, a crown of leaves. They often have a hump on their back, thus accentuating the disabled appearance of the character. The Pende masks, established in the upper Kwango region, are distinguished by their bent noses and distorted mouths, as well as their contrasting color areas. They have a characteristic semi-matte patina.
The Western Pende live along the banks of the Kwilu, while the Easterners have settled on the banks of the ...


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160.00

Sukuma Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Sukuma Mask

Belgian African art collection.
African mask appearing in Tanzania during the dance ceremonies of the dry season. Geometric lines accentuated by linear scarifications. Reddish matte patina, erosions. Height with base: 39 cm.
The Luo, Kuria, Haya and Ziba, the Kéréwé, Karagwé, Sukuma and Nyamézi are established in the central western and central region of Tanzania. Along the shores of Lakes Tanganyika and Nyasa, and Lake Nyassa, the Ha, Jiji, Bendé, Tongwé, Holoholo, Fipa, Manbwé, Kondé, Kisi and Ngoni produced figurative statues, terracotta sculptures and inset masks of teeth.


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230.00

Suku Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Suku Mask

Crowned with a voluminous raffia adornment, this large African Suku mask is called kakungu. This large face with distorted features terrorized the audience. Erosions. Height of the mask excluding raffia = 42 cm.

The Suku and Yaka ethnic groups recognize common origins and have the same social structure as well as similar cultural practices. They can only be differentiated by their stylistic variations. The mukanda is the name given to all the rites surrounding the initiation ceremony for young pubescents, marking the end of childhood and shared by many communities.
Suku kakungu masks are renowned for being among the largest masks in Black Africa. Their exaggerated features were meant to inspire fear in spectators. These masks supposed to control the rain were out during the ...


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490.00

Urhobo Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Urhobo Mask

Occurring during major annual festivals, this type of African maskurhobo is associated with a water spirit (edjorame). Topped with a crown composed of miniature reproductions of the mask, the face embodying a young nubile girl offers lowered eyelids, a toothed mouth, tiny ears. The broad forehead displays vertical keloids.
Grainy patina with brown nuances.
The Urhobos, living near the northwest of the Niger Delta River, form the major ethnic group in Delta State among the 36 states of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. They speak Urhobo, a language of the Niger-Congo group. Along with the Isoko, whose art is similar, they are collectively known as Sobo. Their large sculptures representing the spirits of nature, edjo, or the founding ancestors of the clan, to whom sacrifices were ...


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240.00

Sukuma Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Sukuma Mask

African mask associated with dry season dance ceremonies in Tanzania. Linear scarifications divide the face of which the amplitude of the jaw forms a particularity. Thin sticks represent the teeth in the hollowed-out mouth in a rectangle. Remains of a headdress at the top. Velvety gray patina, erosions. Satin patina.
In the southern coastal region of Tanzania, around Dar-es-Salaam, a relatively homogeneous group produced most of the artistic productions. It includes the Swahili, Kaguru, Doé, Kwéré, Luguru, Zaramo, Kami. The second region is made up of a territory covering southern Tanzania to Mozambique, where some Makonde and the Yao, the Ngindo, Mwéra, and Makua live. In the North-East of Tanzania, the Chaga, Paré, Chamba, Zigua, Massaï, Iraqw, Gogo, and Héhé have an artistic ...


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180.00

Mbunda Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Mbunda Mask

Variant of the mask of the royal ancestor Sachihongo worn by the young circumcised people of the Mukanda society at the end of their initiation lasting several months, thisAfrican mask is male type. In Zambia, masked traditions include a series of specific masks distinguished by their character, behavior and physiognomy. Among the Chokwe, Luvale, Lunda, Luchasi and Mbunda of Zambia they are called makishi, (sing. likishi), while in Angola and the D.R.C. they are known as makishi (sing. mukishi). The sculptor will not name the mask and its costume as such, but rather "the head", and the "body" to define the masked entity. The dancer, embodying the ancestral spirit, will not be held responsible for his actions during the masked demonstrations. The likishi Sachihongo represents ...


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290.00

Boyo Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Boyo Mask

African mask that a beard contours, enhancing the volume of a pointed face. The whitened orbits extend on either side of the nasal bridge, surmounting the oral rectangle. Grainy matte patina.br /> According to stories, the Boyos are of Luba ancestry, through an ancestor who emigrated with her brothers. Migratory flows have mixed Bembe, Lega, Buyu (Buye) or Boyo, Binji and Bangubangu within the same territories. The Basikasingo , considered by some as a Buyu sub-clan, are however not of Bembe origin, the work of Biebuyck having made it possible to trace their history. Organized into lineages, they borrowed the association of Bwami from the Lega. The Bembé and Boyo tribal traditions are relatively similar: they revere the spirits of nature, water specifically among the Boyo, but ...


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150.00

Okwa Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Okwa Mask

A naturalistic face mask, associated with funeral rites, it offers a face coated with white clay marked with traditional vertical bar keloids, also present in the Igbos, cheekbones protruding under large eye cavities, a cut teeth. Locally abraded clear patina, black tops and red ochre.
Idomas have settled at the confluence of Bené and Niger. There are 500,000 farmers and traders. The neighbourhood and therefore the influences of the Igbo, those of the Cross River and Igala ethnic groups have generated stylistic borrowings, and great tribal similarities. Members of their society oglinye, glorifying courage, use masks and cimiers during funerals and festivities. They also produce fertility statues with bleached faces and exhibiting incised teeth. Janiform cimiers are usually exhibited ...


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280.00

Guéré Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Guéré Mask

The African mask Guéré is reputed to be a complex piece both in terms of shapes and, often, also materials. It is here devoid of accessories.
Before the 1960s, the masks, whose elaboration was inspired by the visits of spirits during dreams, accompanied most activities such as war, dance, singing, hunting. Each of these masks had a name associated with its function. It remained the property of the dancer's lineage. The front moves here in a visor, opposing the globular volumes and hooked in the center of the face. Horn-like projections meet on the forehead and under the nose, while a narrow incision forms the mouth. Indigo and red ochre highlights, kaolin on the eyes, enhance the speckled matte patina. If this mask is given a social function, as when required by the chief to order ...


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340.00





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