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African art - Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool:

Stools are numerous in tribal art. Some are of the caryatid type, sitting supported by a statue, others are of the purely usual type such as the beaded Bamileke stools used in the chieftaincy by the notables. Chairs, stools and thrones of all African ethnic groups are real collector's items. They are now magnificent decorative objects in an interior, whatever the style.


Kipona Tabouret
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Kipona Tabouret

Kneeling, a female effigy, "recepacle of a deceased sovereign leader" (Luba, Roberts) supports the circular tray resting on its cylindrical headdress. The protruding scarifications in the ears converging on the umbilical, "centre of the world" associated with lineage, those of the lower abdomen, the fullness of volumes, symbolize fertility. This stool, named lupona, or kioni or kipona, kiona , according to the sources, constitutes the meeting point of the sovereign, his people, and protective spirits and ancestors, where symbolically and spiritually intermingle past and present. It once formed the foundation upon which the king mulopwe was inducted. Seats were arranged on leopard skins at the inauguration of the new leader. It was only after sitting there that his speech took on a ...


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Luba stool
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Luba stool

Sacredness of carved seats, regalia of prestige, in primitive African art. A caryatid, a female figure depicted standing with arms raised, supports the rectangular aluminum-plated tray. The female figure is the "receptacle of a deceased sovereign chief"( Luba, Roberts). This tabouret named lupona, or kioni, kipona, kiona, depending on the source, constitutes the meeting point of the ruler, his people, and the protective spirits and ancestors, where past and present are symbolically and spiritually intertwined. It was once the seat on which the king was enthroned. The seats were placed on leopard skins during the investiture of the new chief. It was only after sitting on it that his speech took on a royal and divine character. Apart from these exceptional circumstances, the seats ...


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Makondé
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Makondé

Sculpted caryatid seat from the Makonde or Wamakondé, a matrilineal population originating from Mozambique, to be distinguished from the Makonde of Tanzania.
Within the equatorial regions of Central Africa, the craftsmen and artists are the "Mapuundi". The latter mainly carve ebony, in which they fashion prestigious seats such as the abundantly decorated example above, which could be transformed into a chief enthronement support, or more modest, according to the social rank of each. The decorative incisions adorning the edges of the plateau form motifs with a symbolic connotation used by the groups around the great lakes. The tray carried by the woman on her head also refers to the winnowing basket. Shiny patina, indigenous restorations (metal).
According to: "Seats of ...


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290.00  232.00

Luba Stool
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Luba Stool

British African Art Collection.
Sacrality of sculpted seats, prestigious regalia, in primitive African art. A squatting female figure with legs wide apart (Zula style), supporting the top with a circular seat, forms the "receptacle of a deceased sovereign chief" (Luba, Roberts). The prominent scarifications converging towards the umbilicus, "center of the world" associated with the lineage, testify to notions of fertility. This stool named lupona, or kioni, kipona, kiona, depending on the sources, constitutes the meeting point of the sovereign, his people, and the protective spirits and ancestors, where past and present mingle symbolically and spiritually. It once formed the seat on which the king was enthroned. The seats were arranged on leopard skins during the investiture of the ...


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Tabouret Mangbetu
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Tabouret Mangbetu

Ex-Collection Swiss African Art.
The ruler of the kingdoms of tribal Africa did not sit on the ground in any way, a great diversity of foundations were drawn up by the sculptors, such as this insignia of sovereignty, cephalomorphic, embodying the power of the Mangbetu leader. The seat from which arise two small brass domes associated with fertility, is supported by four feet. It is covered with oiled leather while the contours are embellished with large upholstery nails. The high hairstyle is characteristic of that of the Mangbetu aristocrats: from an early age, children suffered a compression of the cranial box by means of raffia bonds. Later, the Mangbetu knitted their hair on wicker strands and applied a headband to the forehead to extract the hair and produce this particular ...


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Stool Songye
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Stool Songye

In the south-west of the Congo, and in Angola and Zambia, each chief had a female caryarid seat, an image of fecundity and fertility and of matrilineal descent. An African figure with the features of the Kifwebe mask plays the role of caryatid here. This type of seat could also serve as a pedestal for mankishi (sing. nkishi) fetishes. These seats were sometimes charged with a bishimba at the level of the head, the umbilicus or in the base.
Three variants of this Kifwebe (pl. Bifwebe) or "chasing death" (Roberts) mask stand out: the masculine (kilume) generally with a high crest, the feminine (kikashi) with a very low or even absent crest, and finally the greater embodying power (kia ndoshi). This type of mask, still used today, seems to come from the border zone between the ...


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480.00  384.00

Dogon stool
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Dogon stool

Everyday objects of African art.
Four arched legs form the center of this small Dogon seat made of very dense wood. The symbolic decorative motifs and sculpted figures refer to Dogon myths. The top is also carefully engraved with a star shape.
Smooth black patina, slight cracks.
The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, their esotericism, their myths and legends. Their population is estimated at around 300,000 souls living in the south-west of the Niger loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (north-west of Ouahigouya ). The villages are often perched on top of the scree on the side of the hills, according to a unique architecture. The history of Dogon migrations and settlements (about ten main groups, ...


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Tabouret Basikassingo
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Tabouret Basikassingo

In homage to their heroic ancestors, the hunter clans, present before the arrival of the Bembé in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo 18th century, have carved statues named misi . The latter, endowed with a triangular face and protruding eyes, form the caryatid subject of this stool. Matte wood, many desication cracks mainly on the seat that has been restored locally (aluminum tongue). Lack on the base.
Fral flows have mixed Bembe, Lega, Buyu (Buye) or Boyo , Binji and Bangubangu within the same territories. The Basikasingo, considered by some to be a Buyu sub-clan, are not of bembe origin, however, as Biebuyck's work has helped to trace their history. Organized in lineages, they borrowed the association of Bwami from the Lega. The bembé and boyo traditions are relatively ...


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Ngala stool
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Ngala stool

Seat collected in the region of Ngalas, Ngombe and Ngbaka. Statuettes representing a couple support the tray of the stool. Indigenous restorations with copper leaf. Satin patina, kaolin highlights. In northwestern Zaire, south of the Ubangi River, on the banks of the Lualaba, live the 120,000 Bantu-speaking Ngombe, led by a chief and a warrior society called Elombe. Their neighbors are the Ngbandi and Ngbaka whose statuary has influenced their tribal sculpture, and various Banda groups. Their masks of geometric appearance are used during the rites of the Mani society. They also produce hunting fetishes for protection, and prestigious objects decorated with tapestry nails.


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Kaguru stool
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Kaguru stool

Old circular seat, with a slightly concave center, carried by three feet. The decoration consists of opposing geometric patterns, finely engraved on the uprights.
Contours and feet eroded.
Gray brown age patina.
In the southern coastal region of Tanzania, around Dar-es-Salaam, a relatively homogeneous group produced most of the artistic productions. It includes the Swahili, Kaguru, Doé, Kwéré, Luguru, Zaramo, Kami. Among these populations, the seats are thrones intended for the heads of lineage, each of them being under the protection of a tutelary spirit. These stools were set apart in shrines named kolelo, guarded by priests.


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280.00  224.00

Luba stool
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Luba stool

Prestigious African furniture and female representation.
Can be used as a side table, a pedestal table, this carved African stool, of the Luba type, features a majestic caryatid statue, covered with protruding body scarifications, specific marks of identity. Congolese groups. Eyes whitened with kaolin symbolize communication between women and spirits. The glossy top has an inclination.
The Kusu established on the left bank of the Lualaba have borrowed the artistic traditions of the Luba and the Hemba and have a caste system similar to that Luba . The stool named lupona , or kioni or kipona , kiona , according to the sources, constitutes the meeting point of the sovereign, his people, and the protective spirits and ancestors, where symbolically and spiritually mix past ...


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Luba Stool
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Luba Stool

A caryatid "receptacle of a deceased sovereign chief" (Luba, Roberts), sculpted in the round, supports the circular top of this prestigious seat. The protruding scarifications in ears converging towards the umbilicus, "center of the world" associated with the lineage, those of the lower abdomen, are related to fertility. This stool named lupona, or kioni or kipona, kiona, according to the sources, constitutes the meeting point of the sovereign, his people , and protective spirits and ancestors, where past and present mingle symbolically and spiritually. It once formed the seat on which King mulopwe was enthroned. The seats were arranged on leopard skins during the investiture of the new leader. Only after sitting there did his speech take on a royal and divine character. Apart from ...


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Luba seat
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Luba seat

Ex-collection British African tribal art.
Sacrality of the carved seats, regalia of prestige, in the primitive African art. A female figure squatting with legs widely apart (Zula style), supporting the tray of a circular seat, forms the "receptacle of a deceased sovereign chief" (Luba, Roberts). The protruding scarification marks converging towards the umbilicus, the "center of the world" associated with lineage, bear witness to notions of fertility. This stool named lupona ,or kioni ,kipona , kiona , according to the sources, is the meeting point of the sovereign, his people, and the protecting spirits and ancestors, where past and present symbolically and spiritually mingle. It once formed the foundation on which the king was enthroned. The seats were laid out on leopard skins ...


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Luba stool
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Luba stool

Two caryatids "receptacles of a deceased sovereign chief" (Luba, Roberts), finely sculpted in the round, support the circular tray resting on their headdresses with their fingertips. The protruding scarifications in ears converging towards the umbilicus, "center of the world" associated with the lineage, those of the lower abdomen, refer to fertility. This stool named lupona, or kioni or kipona, kiona, according to the sources, constitutes the meeting point of the sovereign, his people , and protective spirits and ancestors, where past and present mingle symbolically and spiritually. It once formed the seat on which King mulopwe was enthroned. The seats were arranged on leopard skins during the investiture of the new leader. Only after sitting there did his speech take on a royal and ...


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Bamileke stool
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Bamileke stool

In African art, the Bamiléké demonstrate their expertise through the use of multicolored beads.
This monoxyle seat, named rü mfo among the Bamum, features motifs such as the leopard, and two dignitaries with regalia. The leopard forms a recurring motif because it symbolizes royal qualities. Moreover, once killed, the skins and teeth of the feline were returned to the king. These attributes of prestige played a role in the rituals. A basic structure is carved in wood and then covered with a lattice of imported pearls and cowries, an ancient currency associated with wealth, over a cloth of rabane.
Located in the Nigerian border region, Cameroon's northwestern province, the Grassland is made up of several ethnic groups-Tikar, Anyang, Widekum, Chamba, Bamoun, or Bamum ...


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Tikar s prestigious bronze tab
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Tikar Seat

Attesting to the social origin of its owner, the African chair is a piece of furniture designed to enhance its prestige. It is therefore often decorated in its middle part with anthropomorphic or zoomorphic figures in relation to the founding myths and beliefs of the ethnic group. The specimen presented is formed of a ring on which five graceful caryatid figures, perched on heads, support with their arms raised a circular seat. The tray is engraved with regular concentric motifs and broken lines, and drawings of cauris, symbols of wealth. The characters with the filiform body have a voluminous head typical of Cameroonian statuary.
The Tikars populate the western part of central Cameroon, which lies within the dense secondary forest of medium altitude, along the Mbam. Within this ...

Bamileke Table
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Bamileke Table

In African art, the Bamiléké demonstrate their skills through the use of multicolored beads.
This monoxyle seat with the appearance of a table, named rü mfo among the Bamum, features human figurative motifs. A basic structure is carved from wood and then covered, above a rag cloth, with a latticework of imported multicolored beads.br>
Located in the border region of Nigeria, Cameroon's northwestern province, the Grassland is made up of several ethnic groups: Tikar, Anyang, Widekum, Chamba, Bamoun, or Bamum and Bamileke. Several centralized chiefdoms, or kingdoms, based on customary associations, secret societies,are organized around the Fon who has broad powers. Among the Bamilekes of Sudanese-Bantu origin, as in other ethnic groups, art objects testified to their ...


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Bamileke stool
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Bamileke stool

In African art, the Bamiléké demonstrate their know-how through the use of multicolored beads.
This monoxyle seat, named rü mfo among the Bamum, has a caryatid pattern in the form of a bird figure. A basic structure is carved in wood and then covered, above a canvas of rabane, with a latticework of imported pearls and cowries, an ancient currency associated with wealth.

Located in the border region of Nigeria, the North West Province of Cameroon, the Grassland is made up of several ethnic groups: Tikar, Anyang, Widekum, Chamba, Bamoun, or Bamum and Bamileke. Several centralized chiefdoms, or kingdoms, based on customary associations, secret societies, are organized around the Fon who has broad powers. Among the Bamilékés of Sudano-Bantu origin, as in other ...


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Seat of dignitary Bamileke Kuo koko
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Bamileke table

In African art, the Bamiléké demonstrate their know-how through the use of multicolored beads.
This monoxyl seat having the appearance of a table, named rü mfo among the Bamum, presents human figurative motifs. A basic structure is carved in wood and then covered, above a canvas of rabane, with a lattice of imported multicolored beads. br>
Located in the border region of Nigeria, the North West Province of Cameroon, Grassland is made up of several ethnic groups: Tikar, Anyang, Widekum, Chamba, Bamoun, or Bamum and Bamileke. Several centralized chiefdoms, or kingdoms, based on customary associations, secret societies, are organized around the Fon which has broad powers. Among the Bamilekes of Sudano-Bantu origin, as in other ethnic groups, art objects testified ...


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780.00  624.00

Tanzania Headquarters
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Tanzania Headquarters

Attesting to the social origin of its owner, the African chair is a personal piece of furniture designed to enhance its prestige. It is therefore often decorated in its middle part with anthropomorphic or zoomorphic figures in relation to the founding myths and beliefs of the ethnic group. A monoxyle sculpture whose anthropomorphic foot resting on a cylindrical base depicts a young woman, mythical ancestor, with arms bent parallel to the bust, pupils encrusted with hollowed beads, the upper lip as if distended by a labret. She wears a finely engraved copper torque. The seat is highlighted on its outline by a double frieze of diamonds carved into the wood and its surface encrusted with brass shards forming harmonious decorative motifs. In the southern region of Tanzania's coastline, around ...


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Pokot stool
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Pokot stool

A prestigious object aimed at enhancing the status of its user, an expression of traditional African art, this monoxyle headrest or even "dream support", constitutes, for the tribes of Kenya and Uganda, a pillow to preserve elaborate headdresses during sleep. It was also used as a stool. Among the Turkana, they are offered to the future wife as a wedding vow, and returned to the man in case of refusal. Among the Pokot established in the region from Lake Turkana to Lake Baringo, it is the present which marks the ceremonies of the passage to adulthood or even a reward for a victory during a conflict.
Headrests frequently take the stylized form of an animal, cattle being of utmost importance to the pastoralist tribes of East Africa. This example, standing on three outward curved ...


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