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African art - African Dolls:

Many contemporary commentaries claim that dolls and puppets were introduced to the African continent by Catholic missions for didactic purposes. However, it is obvious that the ancestral tradition of the puppeteer show existed well before the arrival of the missions. African puppets are predominant in male shows, while dolls are used by girls and women.


Biga Mossi Fertility Doll
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African art > African Dolls > Biga doll

A schematic anthropomorphic figure, whose appearance of the head varies by region, it represents a spirit with which a relationship is established. The tubular bust, slightly bulging in the abdomen, has conical breasts. The thin angular head worn by a long neck refers to the female hairstyle in crest, the incisions parallel to the scarifications and braids of the ethnic group. Locally thinly lit dark brown glossy patina.
The use of dolls by young African women is not done exclusively within the initiation context. When menstruation occurs, the girl is considered a potential mother. In many ethnic groups, the search for fertility is done through intitiatic rites. Wooden figures will then be carved, some reflecting both genres, in many cases coated with beads and clothing. During the ...


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Couple of statuettes ibedji Yoruba
African art > African Dolls > Couple Ibeji

Wearing only protective adornment 'abiku' colorful pearl necklaces, these doll statuettes (statues), evoking twins, have a conical hairstyle formed of braids. A specificity distinguishes them, the prominent mouth in the form of a beak symolating in the Yorubala divination and the occult world.
Dark brown glossy surface. Indigo residues on the headdress.br- In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for dwo. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash it and feed it regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man also sometimes had ibeji for his wife carve in order to induce pregnancy. Supporting the twin's soul, ...


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350.00

Statuette Ere Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African Dolls > Statuette Ibeji

Wearing braids in conical buns, this female statuette depicted perched on a circular base, features a thick metal torque, wide rings on the wrists. Crusty libation residues clustered on the surface. Indigo pigments remain on the headdress. Sculpted according to the Ifa indications transmitted to the soothsayer, the babalawo , the Ibedji statuettes played the role of substitute for the death of the child.
The statues are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of it; they anoint them with oil and feed them regularly. If it disappears it is the remaining twin who takes over.
Puted as much more than a physical representation of a loved one, linked to the cult of Shango, the ibedji statues are supposed to influence the life and ...


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290.00 € 232.00 ( -20.0 %)

Couple of twins Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African Statues > Ibedji Yoruba

Here, the "abiku", adornments with a protective purpose, can be found here in each of the characters carved into coloured pearl necklaces, cauris chains, and metal bells. These statuette-dolls "ere" (statues), evoking twins, feature a hairstyle formed of braids gathered in a sagittal crest.
Satric glossy surface.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man sometimes had ibeji for his wife to sculpt in order to arouse pregnancy. Supporting the soul of the twin, the ibeji influences the life of the ...


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300.00 € 240.00 ( -20.0 %)

Namji Dowayo Doll
African art > African Dolls > Namji Fetish

Belgian African art collection.
Symbol, in the eyes of the Namji of Cameroon, of fertility and fertility, this stylized feminine effigy whose limbs in rectangular volume have summary but digitized hands and feet adorned with beaded bracelets. The doll has a voluminous bust disappearing under a cluster of different talismans tied, horn, cauris, beads of round and tubular glasses, small leather bag. A proportionally reduced head, with pupils encrusted with beads, displays a crest. Abraded-use skate. It is only recently that the dolls of the Namji or Dowayo , an animist mountain people living in northern Cameroon, have only recently been known. These effigies represent the human body in stylized elementary forms. These African tribal dolls are carved in wood by the blacksmith, at first ...


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650.00

Poupée Mossi Biga
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African art > African Statues > Mossi doll

A schematic anthropomorphic sculpture, whose appearance of the head varies by region, it represents a spirit with which a relationship is established. As a fertility attribute, the stylized chest is highlighted on the tubular bust marked with linear scarifications. The stylized head evokes the braids worn in crests by the girls. Satin light brown patina. The use of dolls by young African women is not done exclusively within the initiation context. When menstruation occurs, the girl is considered a potential mother. In many ethnic groups, the search for fertility is then done through rituals. Wooden figures will then be carved, some reflecting both genres, in many cases covered with pearls and clothing. During the period of confinement, the doll, which becomes a child who asks to be fed, ...


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Doll Ashanti Akuaba
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

The Akuaba doll statuettes (plural Akua'mma) are primarily amulets used by Ashanti women to promote fertility. They are easily identifiable by their structure. Their circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part, the features are usually drawn in the lower third of the head. The latter is worn by a body with rounded shapes whose contours are embellished with necklaces of glass beads. Smooth satin patina. This people regard women as the final arbiter of all decisions. Fertility and children are the most common themes evoked in Ashanti wood carvings. This ethnic group has built a relatively democratic society based on the moral value of the individual. The Ashanti founded a monarchy as early as the 17th century. The identities of the various Akan ethnic groups have been ...


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Statuette Ere Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African Statues > Statuette Ibedji

Wearing braids in conical buns, this statuette depicted naked on a circular base, features a thick metal torque and crusty libation residue crystallized on the surface.
Sculpted according to ifa indications transmitted to the soothsayer, the babalawo , the Ibedji statuettes played the role of substitute for the death of the child.
The statues are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of it; they anoint them with oil and feed them regularly. If it disappears it is the remaining twin who takes over.
Puted as much more than a physical representation of a loved one, linked to the cult of Shango, the ibedji statues are supposed to influence the life and prosperity of the family, and the family continues to pray to them on ...

Couple of statuettes Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African Statues > Statuettes Ibedji

Here, the protective adornments of the " are available in multiple rows of coloured necklaces and leather amulet bags for these statuette-dolls "ere" (statues), embodying twins. Based on spherical bases, the characters are depicted wearing a sagittal crest made of braided hair gathered in a shell. Hands are placed on the hips. Smooth, sainy surface, residual red bark powder inlays.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man sometimes had ibeji for his wife to sculpt in order to arouse pregnancy. ...

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Fertility figure Akua ba Ashanti
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African art > African Dolls > Ashnati doll

Akuaba doll statuettes (plural Akua'mma) are amulets used by Ashanti women to promote fertility. They are easily identifiable by their structure. Their circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part, the lines usually appear in the lower third of the head. The latter is carried by a small cylindrical body whose arms develop at a right angle. The legs are absent, the trunk integrating directly into a slightly wider base.
Patine oiled honey.
This people consider women to be the final arbiter of all decisions. Fertility and children are the most common themes mentioned in Ashanti wood carvings. This ethnic group has built a relatively democratic society based on the moral value of the individual. The Ashanti founded a monarchy as early as the 17th century. The ...


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Statuette Ere Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African Statues > Statuette Ibedji

Sculpted according to the Ifa indications transmitted to the soothsayer, the babalawo, the Ibedji statuettes acted as a substitute for the death of the child. The statuettes are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of it; they anoint them with oil and feed them regularly. If it disappears it is the remaining twin who takes over. Considered to be much more than a physical representation of a loved one. The ibedji statues influence the life of the family, which is why the family continues to pray to them and to worship and libations. This feminine statuette is draped in a woven cotton garment on which are regularly embroidered currants symbolizing wealth and fertility. These ibedji statues are among the most well-known art objects of the ...

Doll Ashanti Akuaba
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Fertility figures of African art Ashanti
This stylized female figure is called Akua'ba (plural Akua'mma). It has traditional features: a flat, circular head surmounting a tubular bust with horizontal arms. Fine necklaces of vivid beads highlight the volumes. Smooth ebony patina.
These stylized wooden effigies were worn by pregnant women, huddled in their loincloths, to ensure the arrival of beautiful children. The overwhelming majority of these statues are female, with breasts.

Shanti are one of the ethnic groups of Ghana (formerly "), part of the Akan group, living in a forested area. Like other people living in the central and southern part of Ghana, she speaks a language of the Twi group. This people regard women as the final arbiter of all decisions. Fertility ...


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Ewe fetish statuette
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African art > African fetish > Ewe Fetish

African art and tribal cult vodun of the ewe and fon
Affubé populations of various amulets in the form of jewelry, horns filled with substances mixed with red clay, metal accessories, dried seeds, and reptile skin belt, this realistic statuette was ritually coating with a thick powder coating peeling locally. The pupils are made up of red beads, and one of the feet is altered. Desication cracks, furrows.
In Togo, African fetishes are part of beneficial or evil rituals according to the intentions of their owner. The fetishists, following the divination ritual of the fa using palm nuts, make them to order to offer protective and medicinal virtues but also offer more conventional ready-to-use versions.
These practices are still in use today are sometimes decried and ...


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Fertility doll Fanti Akuaba
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African art > African Dolls > Fanti doll

Fante's African art is illustrated by its fertility dolls worn by pregnant women, who should not lay eyes on a malformed being or object for fear of conceiving such a child. On the other hand, by looking at these dolls, expressions of idealized beauty, they are supposed to promote the beauty of their future children.
This statuette whose head is present on both sides of geometric engravings associated with the scarifications in use features a black patina with a satin speckled black patina. These dolls carved in the Fante, a population akan of the coastal regions of Ghana, former gold coast, form a different version from those of the Ashanti. However, their function is more or less similar. The head here adopts a rectangular shape. We find the ringed neck and tubular bust with ...


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150.00 € 120.00 ( -20.0 %)

Ashanti doll
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

African art fertility figures Ashanti

This female doll is called Akua'ba (plural Akua'mma); its head is flat and circular on a body with a curved chest and buttocks and a protruding umbilical. Exception to the rule, rounded volumes replace the stylized body, devoid of lower limbs. The yellow beaded adornments contrast here with the locally abraded dark patina.
These stylized wooden effigies were worn by pregnant women, squeezed in their loincloths, to ensure the arrival of beautiful children. The overwhelming majority of these statues are female, with breasts.

The Ashanti are one of the ethnic groups of Ghana (formerly "Côte de l'Or"), part of the Akan group, living in a forested region. Like other populations living in the central and southern part of Ghana, ...


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Namji Dowayo fetish doll
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African art > African Dolls > Namji doll

The dolls of the Namji or Dowayo , an animist mountain people living in northern Cameroon, have recently become known. These effigies represent the human body in stylized elementary forms. This anthropomorphic sculpture, with shoulders and hips forming a rectangle with limbs, features three heads marked with oblique scarifications, necks adorned with rows of pearl necklaces and a bust covered with talisman-like elements: large conus, leather pouches, necklaces of large tubular and caulk beads associated with fertility and richness.
Lustrous, velvety patina.
These African tribal dolls are carved in wood by the blacksmith, at first for the play of little girls. But these dolls are mostly used by sterile women in complex fertility rituals, the doll becoming a surrogate child ...


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Fertility doll Akua ba Fante
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African art > African Dolls > Fanti figurines

Fante art has become known mainly for its fertility dolls, which are worn by pregnant women, who do not have to lay eyes on a malformed being or object, lest their children resemble them. On the other hand, by looking at these dolls, expressions of idealized beauty, they are supposed to promote the beauty of their future children. These dolls carved in the Fante, population akan coastal regions of Ghana, ancient gold coast, have a slightly different appearance than those of the Ashanti. However, their function is more or less similar. The head here adopts a rectangular shape. We find the ringed neck and the tubular bust, here devoid of arms, established on a cicular base and reduced breasts. This statuette, the back of which features geometric engravings associated with the scarfications ...

Statuette Ewe Venovi
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African art > African Dolls > Ewe Doll

A Togolese version of the Ibedji fetish statuettes of The Yoruba of Nigeria, the fetish carved according to traditional conventions is simply enclosed by a textile held by a string. The object was ritually coated with indigo forming a thick film. Desication cracks. The Ewe consider the birth of twins called Venavi (or Venovi) as a happy omen. They must be treated equally and fairly. For example, both will be fed and washed at the same time and will wear the same clothes until puberty. If one of the twins dies, the parents obtain a statuette to replace the deceased child and turn to a fetishist to activate its magical virtues.
She will be of the same sex as the child she represents and replaces but plans into the future that the child will not have known by sporting adult traits. ...


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Couple of twins Venovi Ewe
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African art > African Dolls > Couple Ewe

A Togolese version of the Ibedji fetish statuettes of The Yoruba of Nigeria, the figures with stocky bodies rest on large rounded feet whose blackening indicates shoes. Glossy yellow ochre patina. Desication cracks. The Ewe , living in the coastal region west of the Volta and south of Togo, consider the birth of twins called Venavi (or Venovi) as a happy omen. They must be treated equally and fairly. For example, both will be fed and washed at the same time and will wear the same clothes until puberty. If one of the twins dies, the parents obtain a statuette to replace the deceased child and turn to a fetishist to activate its magical virtues.
She will be of the same sex as the child she represents and replaces but plans into the future that the child will not have known by sporting ...


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Namji Fertility Doll, Namchi
African art > African Dolls > Statue Namji

Fertility dolls of African art
This ancient copy offers a stylized anthropomorphic evocation whose rectangular limbs feature rough circular hands and feet. Glass beaded bracelets and necklaces highlight the shapes of the object swaddled in textiles. A proportionally reduced head, with exorbitant round pupils, emerges from the set. The crest hairstyle is pierced with a tether opening. Small talismans, in the form of shells, leather bags, calabash fragments, are joined to the adornments embellishing the doll. The sides of the face are notched indicating the traditional scarifications of the ethnic group. Abraded-use skate. It is only recently that the dolls of the Namji or Dowayo , an animist mountain people living in northern Cameroon, have only recently been known. These effigies ...


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170.00

Ashanti Akuaba doll
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African art > African Statues > Ashanti doll

African art fertility figures Ashanti
Given generous feminine attributes, this female doll is called Akua'ba (plural Akua'mma). This copy retains the flat and circular head of its stylized sisters, but in this case the body displays a curved chest and buttocks and a prominent umbilical. Fine necklaces of bright pearls, concealing a loincloth in textiles, emphasize her hips. Locally abraded dark skate.
These stylized wooden effigies were worn by pregnant women, squeezed in their loincloths, to ensure the arrival of beautiful children. The overwhelming majority of these statues are female, with breasts.

The Ashanti are one of the ethnic groups of Ghana (formerly "Côte de l'Or"), part of the Akan group, living in a forested region. Like other populations living in the ...


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