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African art - Head rest:

The neck rest is a nomadic way to rest in the shade of baobabs. It is also used by women who wish to maintain their elaborate hairstyles while sleeping. Often endowed with a beautiful patina due to their mode of use. From North to South, from West to East, we find the neckrest everywhere in Africa.


Tabwa headrest
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African art > Head rest > Tabwa headrest

Figurative neckrest whose motifs are two heads rising from a common base connected by their hairstyle. The faces bear the traditional linear scarifications of the group. This type of object could also be used, on occasion, as a stool.
Black patina, small chips and abrasions.
The Tabwa ("scarify" and "write") constitute an ethnic group present in the South-East of the DRC, around Lake Tanganyika. The tribes of this region, such as the Tumbwe, worship Mipasi ancestors through sculptures held by chiefs or sorcerers. A magic charge (dawa) was frequently introduced at the top of the head of the statues. Soothsayers-healers used this type of object to reveal witchcraft and protect against malevolent spirits. . Simple farmers without centralized power, the Tabwa federated ...


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Rungu headrest
African art > Head rest > Rungu headrest

Three legs support the rectangular top of this African headrest decorated with two similar busts. The glossy wood tray is of a mahogany tone while the statuettes adopt a dark patina. Very slight erosion. Tribe of the Tabwa group, the Rungu are established in a region between the D.R.C. (Democratic Republic of Congo), Zambia and Tanzania. Under the influence of the neighboring Lubas and Bemba, the Rungu produced prestigious objects for dignitaries, stools, combs, spoons and scepters, frequently decorated with figures of couples or twins. Their king, called mwéné tafuna , lives in Zambia. A women's association, Kamanya , has dolls like those of the Tabwas.


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180.00

Luba Head support
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African art > Head rest > Luba Head support

Headrest whose motif depicts a couple associated with the primordial ancestors. The posture, genitals in contact with the ground, would offer a precise symbolism for the Lubas. Sculpture from Luba and related groups frequently depicts women and their connection to royalty and bavidye spirits. Brown satin patina, cracks.
Formerly subject to the Luba, then to the Lundas, the Zela, Muzela, or Wazela, have adopted a large part of their customs and traditions. Established between the Luvua River and Lake Kisalé, they are today organized into four chiefdoms under the supervision of leaders of Luba origin. They venerate a primordial couple frequently represented in statuary, mythical ancestors, and dedicate offerings to the spirits of nature.


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240.00  192.00

Yaka neck support
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African art > Head rest > Yaka neck support

This type of neckrest called musaw or m-baambu, kept in the bedrooms, is part of the African tribal art objects integrating the personal ritual charms of the matrilineal leaders and heads of families in order to preserve their headdresses. Some of these sculptures had magical charges inserted into discreet cavities. Brown patina with mahogany reflections.
Hierarchical and authoritarian, made up of formidable warriors, Yaka society was governed by lineage leaders with the right to life and death over their subjects. Hunting and the prestige that results from it are nowadays an opportunity for the Yaka to invoke the ancestors and to resort to rituals using charms linked to the "khosi" institution. The youth initiation society is the n-khanda, which is found among the eastern Kongo ...


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140.00  112.00

Neck rest Kuba
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African art > Head rest > Neck rest Kuba


Within the figurative sculpture of the Kuba, the prestigious objects held by the members of the Kuba royal family and the peripheral groups, Bushoong and Dengese, are always decorated with engraved patterns, parallel lines, intersecting, and checkerboards. The same geometric patterns, however, adorn objects for individual use, such as this headrest with a cephalomorphic pattern. Satin nuanced brown patina.
The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the main Bushoong tribe which is still ruled by a king today, and whose capital was Nshyeeng or Mushenge. More than twenty types of tribal masks are used among the Kuba or "lightning people". The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige items created for members of the high ranks of their society. Several Kuba ...


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340.00  272.00

Luba neck support
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African art > Head rest > Luba neck support

TheLuba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neckrests and stools made up of a caryatid figure and sometimes an animal motif, the duiker as here.
In this case it is a female figure, embodiment of royalty and the spirit of the ancestors, riding the animal. Antelope horns were used, laden with magical ingredients, in therapeutic rites.
Neckrests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Greyish light brown patina. Slight cracks.
The Luba (Baluba in Chiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River, hence the name (Baluba, which means “the Lubas”). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the ...


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Luba Neck support
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African art > Head rest > Luba Neck support

The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neckrests and stools made up of a caryatid figure. The figures adorning this neckrest to preserve the complex headdress of its owner refer to Luba royalty and tutelary spirits. But neckrests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Light brown patina, erosion and cracks.
The major role held by women in the political life of the kingdom is illustrated by the recurrence of the female motif in Luba art. The latter, which stood out for its prestige and quality, therefore greatly influenced the neighboring groups. The secrets of royalty (the bizila) were held by women thanks to their role as political and spiritual intermediaries. Source: ...


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Muzela neck support
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African art > Head rest > Muzela neck support

Headrest with female caryatid motif of Luba or Zela origin. The posture of the character evokes a particular symbolism for the Lubas, the genitals being in contact with the earth. The sculpture of the Luba and related groups indeed represents the woman and her connection with royalty and the bavidye spirits. Brown satin patina, erosions.
Formerly subject to the Luba, then to the Lundas, the Zela, Muzela, or Wazela, have adopted a large part of their customs and traditions. Established between the Luvua River and Lake Kisalé, they are now organized into four chiefdoms under the supervision of leaders of Luba origin. They venerate a primordial couple frequently represented in statuary, mythical ancestors, and dedicate offerings to the spirits of nature.


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120.00  96.00

Luba neck support
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African art > Head rest > Luba neck support

Belgian African art collection
The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neckrests and stools made up of a caryatid figure. The African figures adorning this neckrest that must preserve the complex headdress of its owner refer to Luba royalty. But neckrests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Brown satin patina, light pigment residues. The Luba (Baluba in Chiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River, hence the name (Baluba, which means “the Lubas”). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of Ilunga Kalala who killed the old king Kongolo who has since been revered in the ...


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Luba neck support
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African art > Head rest > Luba neck support

Belgian African art collection
The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neckrests and stools made up of a caryatid figure. The figures adorning this neckrest that must preserve the complex headdress of its owner refer to Luba royalty. But neckrests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Brown satin patina, light pigment residues.
The Luba (Baluba in Chiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River, hence the name (Baluba, which means “the Lubas”). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of Ilunga Kalala who killed the old king Kongolo who has since been revered in the ...


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Neckrest Kenya
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African art > Head rest > Neckrest Kenya

Prestigious African sculpture aiming to enhance the status of its user, an expression of African art, this monoxyl headrest or even "support of dream" equipped with its strap, constitutes, for the tribes of Kenya and Uganda, a pillow intended to preserve, during sleep, the elaborate headdresses. It could also be used as a stool. Among the Turkana, they are offered to the future wife as a wedding vow, and returned to the man in case of refusal. Among the Pokot established in the region from Lake Turkana to Lake Baringo, it is the present which marks the ceremonies of the passage to adulthood or even a reward for a victory during a conflict.
Headrests frequently take the stylized form of an animal, cattle being of utmost importance to the pastoralist tribes of East Africa. Light brown ...


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Yaka neck support
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African art > Head rest > Yaka neck support

This type of neckrest, named musaw or m-baambu, is part of the objects of African tribal art integrating the ritual charms of the leaders of matrilineage and heads of families. The latter, who kept them in their bedrooms, sought to preserve their sophisticated tribal headdresses.
Some of these sculptures had magical charges inserted in discreet cavities.
Black satin patina.
Hierarchical and authoritarian, made up of formidable warriors, Yaka society was governed by lineage leaders with the right to life and death over their subjects. Hunting and the prestige that results from it are nowadays an opportunity for the Yaka to invoke the ancestors and to resort to rituals using charms linked to the "khosi" institution. The youth initiation society is the n-khanda, which ...


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240.00  192.00

Kuba neck support
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African art > Head rest > Kuba neck support

Within the figurative sculpture of the Kuba, the prestigious objects held by members of the Kuba royal family and the peripheral groups, Bushoong and Dengese, are richly decorated with engraved motifs. The same geometric patterns adorn objects for individual use, such as this kuba-type headrest. Light patina.
Desication cracks, small accidents.
The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the main tribe Bushoong which is still ruled today by a king, and whose capital was Nshyeeng or Mushenge. More than twenty types of tribal masks are used among the Kuba or "lightning people", with meanings and functions that vary from group to group. Ritual ceremonies were an opportunity to exhibit decorative arts and masks, in order to honor the spirit of the deceased or to honor ...


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290.00  232.00

Egyptian neck support
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African art > Head rest > Egyptian neck support

The clean lines of this Egyptian New Kingdom type headrest reveal a black patina. Established on a wide base, the neckrest rises from a faceted foot to curve deeply. Black patina, small accidents.


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240.00  192.00

Boni neck support
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African art > Head rest > Boni neck support

Among the elements of traditional East African furniture, this type of African neckrest has a smooth and shiny mahogany patina. Its structure gives it, although coming from traditional African art, a refined design. More than eighty ethnic groups in Ethiopia have produced different headrests for individual use named yagerteras, or “my country pillows” or “Boraati” (“tomorrow you”).
Minimal cracking.
Over time, the realization becoming more complex until they became real small masterpieces of sculpture, they also became individual objects of prestige and power, placed on family or collective altars. These objects were originally intended to protect the elaborate hairstyles of their owner (male or female) during the night. But among the Turkana, for example, it is the emblem of ...


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Tabouret Mangbetu
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Tabouret Mangbetu

Ex-Collection Swiss African Art.
The ruler of the kingdoms of tribal Africa did not sit on the ground in any way, a great diversity of foundations were drawn up by the sculptors, such as this insignia of sovereignty, cephalomorphic, embodying the power of the Mangbetu leader. The seat from which arise two small brass domes associated with fertility, is supported by four feet. It is covered with oiled leather while the contours are embellished with large upholstery nails. The high hairstyle is characteristic of that of the Mangbetu aristocrats: from an early age, children suffered a compression of the cranial box by means of raffia bonds. Later, the Mangbetu knitted their hair on wicker strands and applied a headband to the forehead to extract the hair and produce this particular ...


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Luba neck support
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African art > Head rest > Luba neck support

The Luba are renowned for the refinement of their African neck rests and seats, which are made up of carved caryatid motifs. The neck rests protecting the headdress at night were also used to support the head of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. These female figures embodying the spirit of an ancestor, vidiye, crouching with legs widely apart (Zula style), and whose heads support the curved prop, form the "receptacle of a deceased sovereign chief"( Luba, Roberts).
Abraded brown patina.

The Luba (Baluba in tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the ...


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Neck rest Tonga
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African art > Head rest > Neck rest Tonga

A piece of furniture used to preserve hairstyles during sleep, it comes in a variety of shapes. This Tonga type specimen is identified by its stylized, arched feet, evoking human legs. The rectangular top, with a gently curved center, is encrusted with decorative motifs composed of nails. Small accidents, cracks. Shiny mahogany patina.


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150.00  120.00

Kaguru Headrest
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African art > Head rest > Kaguru Headrest

Neck rest with rectangular base and columns. The central support, with jambs, is decorated with linear motifs arranged in rhombuses. Dark brown velvety patina, cracks. In the southern coastal region of Tanzania, around Dar-es-Salam, a relatively homogeneous group has produced the bulk of artistic output. It includes the Swahili, Kaguru, Doé, Kwéré, Luguru, Zaramo, Kami. The second region is formed by a territory covering the south of Tanzania to Mozambique, where some Makonde and Yao, Ngindo, Mwéra, and Makua live. In northeastern Tanzania, the Chaga, Paré, Chamba, Zigua, Maasai, Iraqw, Gogo, and Héhé have an artistic production with similarities to Malagasy and Batak art, which could be explained by trade by sea. The Luo, Kuria, Haya and Ziba, the Kéréwé, Karagwé, Sukuma and Nyamézi ...


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Mfini neck support
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African art > Head rest > Mfini neck support

Among the elements of traditional African furniture, this type of African neckrest has a smooth and satin mahogany patina. Its pure forms and its softly curved support give it, although resulting from the traditional African art, a contemporary design. Crack of desiccation on the base. Having been part of the Tio kingdom like the Tekes during the 15th century, the Mfinu became autonomous from the 19th century, grouped into villages headed by the "mbé ". Their sculptures are of the same type as those of the Teke, while differing somewhat. Their neck rests, such as this model, are renowned for their geometric structure.


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Headrest Pende
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African art > Head rest > Headrest Pende

A pende-type neck rest whose curved support is supported by two caryatid figures carved according to the conventions of use. They adopt the famous half-closed gaze, and a singular posture. Two-tone patina, small losses and cracks.
The Western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the Eastern settled on the banks of the Kasaï downstream from Tshikapa. The influence of the neighboring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu is imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity, the Mbuya masks, realistic, produced every ten years, take on a festive function, and embody different characters, and occur successively during ceremonies, agricultural festivals, initiation rituals and circumcision mukanda, enthronement of the chief. Governed by ...


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