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African art - Head rest:

The neck rest is a nomadic way to rest in the shade of baobabs. It is also used by women who wish to maintain their elaborate hairstyles while sleeping. Often endowed with a beautiful patina due to their mode of use. From North to South, from West to East, we find the neckrest everywhere in Africa.


Luba Shankadi neck support
African art > Head rest > Luba headrest

Ex-collection of Belgian African art.

The Shankadis belong to the luba group, and have the same associations and structures. Their mostly realistic statuary is characterized by spectacular hairstyles, a smooth surface, and smaller lower limbs. The "cascade" hairstyle illustrates one of the different braided compositions fashionable in Zaire in the 1800s, highlighting the social status of the wearer. The female effigy symbolizes the Luba royalty and the major role of women within it. Neck rests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Locally abraded dark brown oiled patina.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the ...


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Luba/Songye neck support
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African art > Head rest > Songye neck support

A caryatid figure, in a crouching position, supports with his arms widely deployed the tray of this neck support. The effigy is depicted wearing a female songy mask named kikashi, still in use today. This type of mask is worn during initiations with a long suit and a beard made of natural fibers.
ne black-brown oiled. br-Used as a pillow to preserve the user's hair arrangements, the African neck rest forms a tribal object adorned with different iconographies embodying spiritual forces that are supposed to influence dreams. Some Luba regions have also produced sculptures inspired by songye, sharing many traditions with them.

Sye came from the Shaba region of the DRC and settled between the Lualaba River and the Sankuru River in the middle of the savannah and forests. ...


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Songye neck support
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African art > Head rest > Songye neck support

Used as a pillow to preserve the user's hair arrangements, the African neck rest forms a tribal object adorned with different iconographies embodying spiritual forces that are supposed to influence dreams. A caryatid figure, in a crouching position, supports with his arms widely deployed the tray of this neck support. The effigy is depicted wearing a female songy mask named kikashi, still in use today. This type of mask is worn during initiations with a long suit and a beard made of natural fibers. Plateau and base are eroded. Medium-brown patina, studded inlays.br-The Songye came from the Shaba region of the DRC and settled between the Lualaba River and the Sankuru River in the middle of the savannah and forests. They are governed by the Yakitengé and local chiefs. The secret society ...


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Lozi neckrest
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African art > Head rest > Lozi neckrest

Ex-collection traditional African art from Luxembourg.
Rare Lozi neck-rest from Zambia.
It is Alfred Bertrand who published in 1898 this work "In the country of Ba-Rotsi" at the return of his southern exploration which led him to the sources of the Zambezi. He observed a very particular patina, an indelible trace of use on these Lozi neck rests. This famous Swiss explorer criss-crossed southern Africa from 1895 to 1909, collecting a number of traditional objects or those copied from European examples. Alfred Bertrand quickly became a recognized collector and participated in the Swiss National Exhibition in 1896. He then created his own museum exhibiting the four to five hundred pieces he had collected.


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Luba neck support
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African art > Head rest > Luba headrest

Ex Belgian African art collection.
.The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neck rests and stools made up of a caryatid figure. The figures adorning this neckrest, which must preserve the complex headdress of its owner, refer to Luba royalty. But the neck rests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Medium brown patina abraded.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of Ilunga Kalala, who had the old king Kongolo, venerated since then in the form of ...


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Chokwe or Lwena neck rest
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African art > Head rest > Luena neck rest

African tribal sculpture, element of African furniture to preserve the voluminous traditional headdresses, it is distinguished by its animal motif and orange patina.

Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwe were then subjected to the Lunda empire from which they inherited a new hierarchical system and the sacredness of power. Nevertheless, the Chokwe never fully adopted these new social and political contributions. Three centuries later, the Chokwe eventually took over the capital of the Lunda, which had been weakened by internal conflicts, thus contributing to the dismantling of the kingdom. The Chokwe did not have a centralized power but rather large chiefdoms. It was these chieftainships that attracted artists who wished to put ...


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Headrest Luba Shankadi
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African art > Head rest > Luba headrest

Ex-collection German African art.

The Luba are renowned for their refined statuary and famous in particular for their neck rests and stools made of a caryatid figure. The seated figures, interlaced, one of them leaning on the knees of the second, symbolize Luba royalty. The neck rests protecting the headdresses during the night were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. The figures embody the spirit of an ancestor, vidiye and have a cascading hairstyle in the Shankadi style. Warm brown patina, residual ochre inlays. The Luba (Baluba in tchiluba) are a people from Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). ...


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Dengese figurative backrest
African art > Head rest > Ndengese backrest support

Collection of Belgian African art. This very finely chiseled backrest depicts a figure, female it seems, whose legs come back to rest on the back, the feet resting on the ground, forming a balance with the curved plate.
The flared headdress, often surmounted by a horn, is characteristic of the headdresses acquired by the Totshi chiefs belonging to the ikoho association and evokes particular proverbs. It symbolizes respect, intelligence and maturity. Numerous scarifications are traced all over the body. Brown glossy patina. Very slight cracks at the top.
A central African people settled in Kasai, neighboring the Kuba, the Ndengese form one of the clans descended from a common Mongo ancestor, some of them originating from the Upper Nile. They produced early art ...


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Chokwe, Lwena Figurative neck rest
African art > Head rest > Tschokwe neck rest

African tribal sculpture, a piece of African furniture intended, in addition to use in a ritual context, to preserve the voluminous traditional headdresses of its owners. This neck rest is distinguished by its animal motif and smooth golden brown patina. The Chokwe and their neighbors in Angola produced a variety of seats and headrests with zoomorphic motifs for dignitaries. Abrasions.
Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwe were then subjected to the Lunda empire from which they inherited a new hierarchical system and the sacredness of power. Nevertheless, the Chokwe never fully adopted these new social and political contributions. Three centuries later, the Chokwe eventually took over the capital of the Lunda, which had been weakened ...

Ethiopian neckrest with handle
African art > Head rest > Ethiopian neckrest

Among the elements of traditional East African furniture, this type of African neckrest endowed with a dark glossy patina. Its sleek shapes and trinagular support give it, although from traditional African art, a contemporary design.
More than eighty ethnic groups in Ethiopia have produced different neck rests for individual use named yagerteras, or "pillows of my country" or "Boraati" ("tomorrow you").
Over time, the realization becoming more complex until becoming real small masterpieces of sculpture, they also became individual objects of prestige and power, placed on family or collective altars. These objects were initially intended to protect the elaborate hairstyles of their owner (man or woman) during the night. But among the Turkana for example, it is the emblem ...


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Luba Headrest
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African art > Head rest > Luba Headrest

The Luba are famous in particular for their neck rests and stools made of a caryatid figure. Neck rests protecting headdresses at night were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. These female figures embodying the spirit of an ancestor, vidiye, crouching with legs widely apart (Zula style), whose heads support the curved prop, form the "receptacle of a deceased sovereign chief"( Luba, Roberts). Black brown oiled patina.

The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of ...


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Seat caryatide Pende
African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Pende Stool

Reduced size for this personal furniture object where the foot takes the form of a female figure in a kneeling position. According to Marc Léo Félix, however, few are the seats of dignitaries, because they were buried with their holders. The face here presents the famous look 'zanze' with the half-closed eyes found on the hanging masks. Dark patina abraded.

The seed live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the have settled on the banks of the Kasai river downstream of Tshikapa. The influences of the neighbouring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu, were imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity the masks Mbuya, realistic, produced every ten years, have a festive function, and embody different characters, including the chef, the ...


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140.00

Luba Shankadi neck support
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African art > Head rest > Shankadi neck support

The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neckrests and stools made up of a caryatid figure and sometimes an animal motif, the cephalophe as here.
In this case it is a female figure, embodying royalty and the spirit of the ancestors, riding the animal. Antelope horns were used, loaded with magical ingredients, in therapeutic rites.
Neck rests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Greyish brown matte patina. The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the ...


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Boni headrest Ethiopia
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African art > Head rest > Ethiopian headrest

Among the elements of traditional furniture from East Africa, this type of African neckrest has a smooth and shiny mahogany patina. Its pure forms and gently curved support give it a refined design, even though it comes from traditional African art. More than eighty ethnic groups in Ethiopia have produced various neck rests for individual use called yagerteras, or "pillows of my country" or "Boraati" ("tomorrow you").
Desiccation cracks. Over time, the realization becoming more complex until they became true small masterpieces of sculpture, they also became individual objects of prestige and power, placed on family or collective altars. These objects were initially intended to protect the elaborate hairstyles of their owner (man or woman) during the night. But among the Turkana ...


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Toposa handle headrest
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African art > Head rest > Toposa neck support

African art among the Turkana people
This is an East African population living mainly in north-western Kenya in a hot and arid region west of Lake Turkana, but also in Ethiopia and to a lesser extent in southern Sudan.
The patina is smooth, glossy, reddish brown. Cracks of desiccation.


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Dogon Tellem neck support
African art > Head rest > Tellem neck support

Daily use has abraded and matified this soberly made neckrest, which, thanks to its small size, accompanied its owner on his travels.
The southern part of the plateau overlooking the Bandiagara cliff has been occupied since the 10th century by the Tellem and Niongom. They were then displaced by the Dogon in the 15th century, who fled from the Mande. The Tellem form the ancestors of the Kurumba of Burkina Faso.
The Dogon statuary is not easily distinguished from that of the Tellemand nor from that of the Niongom because reciprocal influences have manifested themselves over the centuries. A recurrence: the characters with arms raised above the head, in a position of invocation.

The African tribal statues of the Dogon can also be the object of worship on ...


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Luba Shankadi headrest
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African art > Head rest > Luba headrest

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The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neckrests and stools made of a caryatid figure. The female effigy symbolizing Luba royalty, here holding a ceremonial calabash, has a cascading shankadi hairstyle. Neck rests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Satin patina.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of Ilunga Kalala, who had the old king Kongolo, who has since been venerated in the form of a python, die. In the sixteenth century they ...


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Luluwa, Lulua headrest
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African art > Head rest > Lulua headrest

A particularly creative design distinguishes the anthropomorphic foot of this neck rest. The head of the character, detached from the body, is indeed offset forward, supporting the plate whose extension leans on the neck, the voluminous feet balancing the whole. Dark patina with mahogany highlights, glossy. It is in the south of the Democratic Republic of Congo that the Lulua , or Béna Lulua ,from West Africa settled. Their social structure, based on castes, is similar to that of the Luba. They produced few masks, but mostly statues of ancestors representing the ideal warrior, mulalenga wa nkashaama, as well as the chief of the Leopard society and mbulenga statuettes related to nature spirits. Despite Kalamba Mukwenge's attempt in the late nineteenth century to ...


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Pokot Kenya studded headrest
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African art > Head rest > Headrest Kenya

Utilitarian object of the African daily life and expression of the African traditional art, this monoxyle headrest or still "support of dream", constitutes, for the tribes of Kenya, a pillow having to preserve, during the sleep, the elaborated headdresses. It is also an object of prestige aiming at enhancing the status of its user. Among the Turkana, they are offered to the future wife as a wedding vow, and returned to the man in case of refusal. Among the Pokot, it is the present that marks the ceremonies of passage to adulthood.
Headrests are often stylized in the form of an animal, as livestock are of the utmost importance to the pastoral tribes of East Africa.
These sculptures accompany their owner on the occasion of festivities.
Mahogany brown glossy patina.

Luba neck support
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African art > Head rest > Luba headrest

The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neck rests and stools made of a caryatid figure. In this case they are seated figures, embodying royalty and the spirit of the ancestors. Neck rests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place.
Satin brown-black patina. The Luba (Baluba in tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of Ilunga Kalala, who had the old king Kongolo, venerated since then in the form of a python, die. In the 16th century they created a state, organized in ...


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Rungu/ Holoholo tripod neck press
African art > Head rest > Rungu headrest

Three legs support the rectangular top of this African headrest decorated with two similar busts. The glossy wood tray is of a mahogany tone while the statuettes adopt a dark patina. Very slight erosion. Tribe of the Tabwa group, the Rungu are established in a region between the D.R.C. (Democratic Republic of Congo), Zambia and Tanzania. Under the influence of the neighboring Lubas and Bemba, the Rungu produced prestigious objects for dignitaries, stools, combs, spoons and scepters, frequently decorated with figures of couples or twins. Their king, called mwéné tafuna , lives in Zambia. A women's association, Kamanya , has dolls like those of the Tabwas.


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