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African art - Head rest:

The neck rest is a nomadic way to rest in the shade of baobabs. It is also used by women who wish to maintain their elaborate hairstyles while sleeping. Often endowed with a beautiful patina due to their mode of use. From North to South, from West to East, we find the neckrest everywhere in Africa.


Mfinu neck support
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African art > Head rest > Mfini neck support

Among the elements of traditional African furniture, this type of African neckrest has a smooth and satin mahogany patina. Its pure forms and its softly curved support give it, although resulting from the traditional African art, a contemporary design. Crack of desiccation on the base. Having been part of the Tio kingdom like the Tekes during the 15th century, the Mfinu became autonomous from the 19th century, grouped into villages headed by the "mbé ". Their sculptures are of the same type as those of the Teke, while differing somewhat. Their neck rests, such as this model, are renowned for their geometric structure.


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Kuba double headrest
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African art > Head rest > Kuba neck support

Within the Figurative sculpture of the Kuba, the prestigious objects held by members of the kuba royal family and the peripheral groups, Bushoong and Dengese, are always decorated with engraved motifs, parallel lines, intersecting, and checkerboards. The same geometric patterns, however, adorn objects for undidiidedul use, such as this headrest. Dark satin patina.
The Kuba Kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the main tribe Bushoong which is still ruled by a king, and whose capital was Nshyeeng or Mushenge.More than twenty types of tribal masks are used in the Kuba or Lightning People, with meanings and functions that vary from group to group. Ritual ceremonies were an opportunity to display decorative arts and masks, in order to honor the spirit of the deceased or to honor ...


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Luba neck rest
African art > Head rest > Luba neck rest

The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neckrests and stools made of a caryatid figure. The figures adorning this headrest, which is meant to preserve the complex headdress of its owner, refer to Luba royalty. But the neck rests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Brown satin patina, light pigment residue. The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of Ilunga Kalala, who had the old king Kongolo, who has since been venerated in the form of a python, die. In the ...


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150.00

Luba neck support
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African art > Head rest > Luba neck support

The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neck-rests and stools made up of a cariatid figure. In this case it is a couple side by side. The neck supports were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. The figures of spouses supporting the stage, with a sophisticated hairstyle, and embodying spirits, are depicted standing. Black brown patina barely satin. Base split frontally.
The Luba (Baluba in Chiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is the Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River, hence the name (Baluba, which means \


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Luba / Zela Headrest
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African art > Head rest > Zela Headrest

This type of neck support comes from the Zula, Zuri, Wazula, still called Luba-Maniema, established in the Democratic Republic of Congo in the north of the Luba territory.
The bust of the sculpted subject embodying an ancestor is engraved with traditional scarifications. The stretched limbs are characteristic of Zula art. Black greasy patina with burgundy highlights. An iconoclastic raid, under the influence of Islamic occupiers, had made disappear most of the ritual sculptures of the Zula. These last ones nevertheless safeguarded the cult of the ancestors, the cult devoted to the spirit alunga, and perpetuated the use of the offerings to the spirits of the nature.
Zula society, divided into castes, has its origins in the Lubas. The Zulas became associated with the ...


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Songye neck support
African art > Head rest > Songye neck support

A caryatid figure supports the narrow tray of this neck rest with her arms widely spread. The effigy is depicted wearing a female Songye mask called kikashi, which is still used today. This type of mask is worn during initiations with a long costume and a beard made of natural fibers. Used as a pillow to preserve the hair arrangements of the wearer, the African neck rest forms a tribal object decorated with various iconographies embodying spiritual forces believed to influence dreams.

The Songye came from the Shaba region of the DRC and settled between the Lualaba and Sankuru rivers in the middle of the savannah and forests. They are governed by the yakitengé and by local chiefs. The Bwadi secret society, however, counterbalances their power. Their male masks, with occult ...


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180.00

Gurage or Oromo neck support Ethiopia
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African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Gurage neck support

African headrests come in an almost infinite variety: this type of African monoxyle headrest, at the same time stool, has a smooth orange patina. Equipped with a spherical foot, a block with an oblong, barely curved top, probably comes from the Gurage, Gima, or Oromo. More than eighty ethnic groups in Ethiopia have indeed produced different neck rests for individual use named yagerteras, or "pillows of my country" or "Boraati" ("tomorrow you").

Erosions.
Over time, the realization becoming more complex until becoming real small masterpieces of sculpture, they also became individual objects of prestige and power, placed on family or collective altars. These objects were initially intended to protect the elaborate hairstyles of their owner (man or woman) during the ...

Yaka Musaw zoomorphic headrest
African art > Head rest > Yaka headrest

This type of neck rest named musaw or m-baambu, is among the African tribal art objects incorporating the ritual charms of matrilineal officials and family heads. The latter, who kept them in their bedrooms, sought to preserve their sophisticated tribal headdresses.
Some of these carvings had magical charges inserted into discrete cavities.
Abraded brown patina.
Hierarchical and authoritarian, composed of formidable warriors, Yaka society was governed by lineage chiefs with the right of life and death over their subjects. The hunt and the prestige that comes with it are the occasion today for the Yaka to invoke the ancestors and to resort to rituals using charms linked to the "khosi" institution. The youth initiation society is the n-khanda, which is found ...


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150.00

Mangbetu headrest with caryatids
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African art > Head rest > Mangbetu headrest

A figure of a kneeling couple supports the tray of this piece of mangbetu furniture. The body tracings refer to the ceremonial paintings of the clan. The high hairstyle is characteristic of the Mangbetu aristocracy: from an early age, children had their skulls compressed by means of raffia ties. Later, the Mangbetu knitted their hair on strands of wicker and applied a band on the forehead to extract the hair and produce this particular headdress that accentuates the elongation of the head. aesthetic refinement of the Mangbetu, and the emphasis placed on fertility . The elders name beli these figures of ancestors stored out of sight and comparable to those belonging to their secret society nebeli . Established in the forest in northeastern Zaire, the Mangbetu kingdom expressed ...

Luba Shankadi neck support
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African art > Head rest > Luba neck support

The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neck rests and stools consisting of a caryatid figure and sometimes an animal motif, the antelope in this case.
In this case it is a female figure, incarnation of royalty and the spirit of the ancestors, riding the animal. The antelope horns were also used, loaded with magical ingredients, in therapeutic rites.
The horn rests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Matt patina.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, ...


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Luba Shankadi Kinkondja neck rest
African art > Head rest > Luba neck rest

Ex Belgian collection of African art. Some neck rests, like this one, have been waxed by their owner, others not.
The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neckrests and stools made up of a caryatid figure and sometimes an animal motif, the cephalophe as here. In this case it is a female figure, incarnation of royalty and the spirit of the ancestors, riding the animal. Antelope horns were used, loaded with magical ingredients, in therapeutic rites. Neck rests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Greyish brown matte patina. The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, hence the name ...


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150.00

Neck rest Kaguru Tanzania
African art > Head rest > Kaguru Headrest

Neck rest with rectangular base and columns. The central support, with jambs, is decorated with linear motifs arranged in rhombuses. Dark brown velvety patina, cracks. In the southern coastal region of Tanzania, around Dar-es-Salam, a relatively homogeneous group has produced the bulk of artistic output. It includes the Swahili, Kaguru, Doé, Kwéré, Luguru, Zaramo, Kami. The second region is formed by a territory covering the south of Tanzania to Mozambique, where some Makonde and Yao, Ngindo, Mwéra, and Makua live. In northeastern Tanzania, the Chaga, Paré, Chamba, Zigua, Maasai, Iraqw, Gogo, and Héhé have an artistic production with similarities to Malagasy and Batak art, which could be explained by trade by sea. The Luo, Kuria, Haya and Ziba, the Kéréwé, Karagwé, Sukuma and Nyamézi ...


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290.00

Neck support Kambaata Ethiopia
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African art > Head rest > Yagertera neck support

Ex-collection African art from Belgium.
Among the elements of traditional furniture from East Africa, this type of African neckrest resting on an openwork base of columns. Its refined forms, striated with parallel lines, give it, although from the traditional African art, a contemporary design.
More than eighty ethnic groups in Ethiopia have produced various neck rests for individual use named yagerteras, or "pillows of my country" or "Boraati" ("tomorrow you").
Over time, the realization becoming more complex until becoming real small masterpieces of sculpture, they also became individual objects of prestige and power, placed on family or collective altars. These objects were initially intended to protect the elaborate hairstyles of their owner (man or woman) ...

Luba/Songye neck support
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African art > Head rest > Songye neck support

A caryatid figure, in a crouching position, supports with his arms widely deployed the tray of this neck support. The effigy is depicted wearing a female songy mask named kikashi, still in use today. This type of mask is worn during initiations with a long suit and a beard made of natural fibers.
ne black-brown oiled. br-Used as a pillow to preserve the user's hair arrangements, the African neck rest forms a tribal object adorned with different iconographies embodying spiritual forces that are supposed to influence dreams. Some Luba regions have also produced sculptures inspired by songye, sharing many traditions with them.

Sye came from the Shaba region of the DRC and settled between the Lualaba River and the Sankuru River in the middle of the savannah and forests. ...


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Luba Headrest
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African art > Head rest > Luba Headrest

The Luba are famous in particular for their neck rests and stools made of a caryatid figure. Neck rests protecting headdresses at night were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. These female figures embodying the spirit of an ancestor, vidiye, crouching with legs widely apart (Zula style), whose heads support the curved prop, form the "receptacle of a deceased sovereign chief"( Luba, Roberts). Black brown oiled patina.

The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of ...


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Tabwa neck rest and pipe
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African art > Head rest > Tabwa pipe

Fascinating double-purpose object, this figurative headrest is supported by caryatid elements ingeniously acting as a pipe. Indeed, the horn inserted in the animal motif composes the mouthpiece of the pipe, the smoke having to escape through the hole made in the head of the carved character. Patina of use, small accidents. The Tabwa ("to scarify" and "to write") constitute an ethnic group present in the South-East of the DRC, around Lake Tanganyika. The tribes of this region, such as the Tumbwe, worship the Mipasi ancestors through sculptures held by chiefs or sorcerers. A magical charge (dawa) was frequently placed at the top of the head of the statues. The diviners-healers used this type of object to reveal sorcery and protect against malevolent spirits. The Tabwa were simple ...


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Luba Shankadi neck support
African art > Head rest > Luba headrest

Ex-collection of Belgian African art.

The Shankadis belong to the luba group, and have the same associations and structures. Their mostly realistic statuary is characterized by spectacular hairstyles, a smooth surface, and smaller lower limbs. The "cascade" hairstyle illustrates one of the different braided compositions fashionable in Zaire in the 1800s, highlighting the social status of the wearer. The female effigy symbolizes the Luba royalty and the major role of women within it. Neck rests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Locally abraded dark brown oiled patina.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the ...


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100.00

Luba Shankadi neck support
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African art > Head rest > Shankadi neck support

The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neckrests and stools made up of a caryatid figure and sometimes an animal motif, the cephalophe as here.
In this case it is a female figure, embodying royalty and the spirit of the ancestors, riding the animal. Antelope horns were used, loaded with magical ingredients, in therapeutic rites.
Neck rests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Greyish brown matte patina. The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the ...


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Songye neck support
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African art > Head rest > Songye neck support

Used as a pillow to preserve the user's hair arrangements, the African neck rest forms a tribal object adorned with different iconographies embodying spiritual forces that are supposed to influence dreams. A caryatid figure, in a crouching position, supports with his arms widely deployed the tray of this neck support. The effigy is depicted wearing a female songy mask named kikashi, still in use today. This type of mask is worn during initiations with a long suit and a beard made of natural fibers. Plateau and base are eroded. Medium-brown patina, studded inlays.br-The Songye came from the Shaba region of the DRC and settled between the Lualaba River and the Sankuru River in the middle of the savannah and forests. They are governed by the Yakitengé and local chiefs. The secret society ...


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Lozi neckrest
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African art > Head rest > Lozi neckrest

Ex-collection traditional African art from Luxembourg.
Rare Lozi neck-rest from Zambia.
It is Alfred Bertrand who published in 1898 this work "In the country of Ba-Rotsi" at the return of his southern exploration which led him to the sources of the Zambezi. He observed a very particular patina, an indelible trace of use on these Lozi neck rests. This famous Swiss explorer criss-crossed southern Africa from 1895 to 1909, collecting a number of traditional objects or those copied from European examples. Alfred Bertrand quickly became a recognized collector and participated in the Swiss National Exhibition in 1896. He then created his own museum exhibiting the four to five hundred pieces he had collected.


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Luba neck support
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African art > Head rest > Luba headrest

Ex Belgian African art collection.
.The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neck rests and stools made up of a caryatid figure. The figures adorning this neckrest, which must preserve the complex headdress of its owner, refer to Luba royalty. But the neck rests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Medium brown patina abraded.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of Ilunga Kalala, who had the old king Kongolo, venerated since then in the form of ...


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