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African art - Head rest:

The neck rest is a nomadic way to rest in the shade of baobabs. It is also used by women who wish to maintain their elaborate hairstyles while sleeping. Often endowed with a beautiful patina due to their mode of use. From North to South, from West to East, we find the neckrest everywhere in Africa.


Rungu/ Holoholo tripod neck press
African art > Head rest > Rungu headrest

Three legs support the rectangular top of this African headrest decorated with two similar busts. The glossy wood tray is of a mahogany tone while the statuettes adopt a dark patina. Very slight erosion. Tribe of the Tabwa group, the Rungu are established in a region between the D.R.C. (Democratic Republic of Congo), Zambia and Tanzania. Under the influence of the neighboring Lubas and Bemba, the Rungu produced prestigious objects for dignitaries, stools, combs, spoons and scepters, frequently decorated with figures of couples or twins. Their king, called mwéné tafuna , lives in Zambia. A women's association, Kamanya , has dolls like those of the Tabwas.


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150.00

Kuba double headrest
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African art > Head rest > Kuba neck support

Within the Figurative sculpture of the Kuba, the prestigious objects held by members of the kuba royal family and the peripheral groups, Bushoong and Dengese, are always decorated with engraved motifs, parallel lines, intersecting, and checkerboards. The same geometric patterns, however, adorn objects for undidiidedul use, such as this headrest. Dark satin patina.
The Kuba Kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the main tribe Bushoong which is still ruled by a king, and whose capital was Nshyeeng or Mushenge.More than twenty types of tribal masks are used in the Kuba or Lightning People, with meanings and functions that vary from group to group. Ritual ceremonies were an opportunity to display decorative arts and masks, in order to honor the spirit of the deceased or to honor ...


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Turkana handle headrest
African art > Head rest > Turkana neck support

African art among the Turkana people
This is an East African population living mainly in north-western Kenya in a hot and arid region west of Lake Turkana, but also in Ethiopia and to a lesser extent in southern Sudan.
The patina is smooth, glossy, reddish brown. Cracks of desiccation.


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150.00

Yaka neck support
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African art > Head rest > Yaka headrest

This type of neck support named musaw or m-baambu, kept in bedrooms, is part of the African tribal art objects incorporating the personal ritual charms of matrilage leaders and heads of families to preserve their beautiful tribal headdresses. This bird would be a reference to the stork. Some of these sculptures had magical charges inserted in discreet cavities. Satin brown patina.
Hierarchical and authoritarian, composed of formidable warriors, the Yaka society was governed by lineage chiefs who had the right of life and death over their subjects. Hunting and the resulting prestige are the occasion nowadays, for the Yaka, to invoke the ancestors and to resort to rituals with the help of charms linked to the "khosi" institution. The initiation society for the young is the ...


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Luba neck support
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African art > Head rest > Luba headrest

Ex Belgian African art collection.
.The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neck rests and stools made up of a caryatid figure. The figures adorning this neckrest, which must preserve the complex headdress of its owner, refer to Luba royalty. But the neck rests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Medium brown patina abraded.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of Ilunga Kalala, who had the old king Kongolo, venerated since then in the form of ...


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Luba Shankadi neck support
African art > Head rest > Luba headrest

Ex-collection of Belgian African art.

The Shankadis belong to the luba group, and have the same associations and structures. Their mostly realistic statuary is characterized by spectacular hairstyles, a smooth surface, and smaller lower limbs. The "cascade" hairstyle illustrates one of the different braided compositions fashionable in Zaire in the 1800s, highlighting the social status of the wearer. The female effigy symbolizes the Luba royalty and the major role of women within it. Neck rests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Locally abraded dark brown oiled patina.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the ...


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150.00

Bena Lulua neck support
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African art > Head rest > Luluwa headrest

The patterns associated with scarification are barely visible on the face and body of the human figure forming the human figure of this piece of African furniture. According to Rik Ceyssens in "Congo Masks" (p.156 . ed. M.L.Félix) and as evidenced by the sketches of H.M. Lemme who accompanied Frobenius on his travels to the Congo, this pattern of scarification loops was widespread in different Luluwa subgroups in 1905. The Bakwa also had this type of tribal scarring. Lustrous mahogany brown patina.
The different types of Luluwa, Lulua, or Bena Lulua statues, presenting multiple scarifications, glorify the local chiefs, maternity, fecundity and the female figure. It is in the south of the Democratic Republic of Congo that the Luluwa, Lulua, or Bena Lulua statues from West ...


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Luba Shankadi Headrest
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African art > Head rest > Luba Headrest

The Luba are renowned for their refined statuary and famous in particular for their neck rests and stools made up of a caryatid figure. The seated figures, embraced, leaning on their feet, symbolize Luba royalty. The neck rests protecting the headdresses during the night were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. The figures embody the spirit of an ancestor, vidiye and have a cascading hairstyle in the Shankadi style. Oiled patina, orange reflections, residual ochre inlays. The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ...


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Luba Shankadi neck support
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African art > Head rest > Luba headrest

The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neck rests and stools made up of a caryatid figure. The feminine effigy adorning this neckrest, which is supposed to preserve the complex headdress of its owner, refers to Luba royalty. Neck rests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. The spirit figure, with a cascading Shankadi style headdress, is shown in a squatting position, hands on hips. Dark glossy patina, cracked desiccation, ochre residues.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic ...


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Kongo headrest
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African art > Head rest > Kongo neck press

Prestigious sculpture of the Kongo, this piece of furniture is formed of a figure of a Caryatid couple incarnating the ancestors of the clan, whose back bears diamond-shaped scarification. The child on the woman's lap would evoke the matrilineal transmission of power. The Yombe decorated their textiles, mats and loincloths with lozenges in relation to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The mouth reveals traditionally filed teeth, the eyes are whitened, underlining the ancestors' ability to discern occult things. Satin orange-brown patina. Abrasions and cracks.
Clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the West African coast, in the southwest of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternity wards.
In the ...


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Headrest Luba Shankadi
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African art > Head rest > Luba headrest

Ex-collection German African art.

The Luba are renowned for their refined statuary and famous in particular for their neck rests and stools made of a caryatid figure. The seated figures, interlaced, one of them leaning on the knees of the second, symbolize Luba royalty. The neck rests protecting the headdresses during the night were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. The figures embody the spirit of an ancestor, vidiye and have a cascading hairstyle in the Shankadi style. Warm brown patina, residual ochre inlays. The Luba (Baluba in tchiluba) are a people from Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). ...


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Luba neck support
African art > Head rest > Luba neck press

Ex-collection German African art.
The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neck-bearings and stools made up of a cariatidic figure. In this case it is a crouching female figure, the embodiment of the royalty and spirit of the ancestors. The neck supports were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Crack on one arm. Satin-red brown patina. Powdery residues. The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is the Katanga, specifically the region of the Lubu River, hence the name (Baluba, which means the Lubas). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of Ilunga Kalala who killed the old king Kongolo, who has since been ...


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100.00

Songye neck support
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African art > Head rest > Songye neck support

Used as a pillow to preserve the user's hair arrangements, the African neck rest forms a tribal object adorned with different iconographies embodying spiritual forces that are supposed to influence dreams. A caryatid figure, in a crouching position, supports with his arms widely deployed the tray of this neck support. The effigy is depicted wearing a female songy mask named kikashi, still in use today. This type of mask is worn during initiations with a long suit and a beard made of natural fibers. Plateau and base are eroded. Medium-brown patina, studded inlays.br-The Songye came from the Shaba region of the DRC and settled between the Lualaba River and the Sankuru River in the middle of the savannah and forests. They are governed by the Yakitengé and local chiefs. The secret society ...


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Turkana neck support
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African art > Head rest > Turkana neck support

African art among Turkana
This is an East African population living mainly in northwestern Kenya in a hot, arid region west of Lake Turkana, but also in Ethiopia and to a lesser extent in South Sudan.

The East African neck-ends are famous and prized for their stripped-down or minimalist aesthetics. The clean lines allow you to appreciate the overall shape as well as the simple but remarkable details.
The piece consists of three parts: on the one hand, half a sphere constituting the base is equipped with nails to ensure stability. A simple vertical mount supports the circular seat. The latter is dug with two concavities on the outline.
The patina is reddish.

Emile's grandfather, Abel Robyn, debuted the collection in 1850.
It was passed down ...


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Pende caryatids neck press
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African art > Head rest > Pende headrest

Aimed at preserving the head adornments, this piece of furniture consists of a curved neck support supported by female figures, positioned back to back, probably evoking the woman soothsayers. The latter also embody, for the user, spirits guardians of his rest. Glossy dark patina.
The seed live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the have settled on the banks of the Kasai river downstream of Tshikapa. The influences of the neighbouring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu, were imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity the masks Mbuya realistic, produced every ten years, have a festive function, and embody different characters, including the chef, the soothsayer and his wife, the prostitute, the possessed, etc. The masks of initiation ...


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Luba Shankadi Headrest
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African art > Head rest > Luba neck press

The Luba are renowned for their refined statuary and famous in particular for their neck supports and stools made up of a cariatidic figure. The seated figures, entwined, leaning on the toes of their opposite, symbolize the Luba royalty. The neck supports protecting the hairstyles at night were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. The characters embody the spirit of an ancestor, vidiye and are endowed with a cascading Shankadi-style hairstyle. Brown patina with orange reflections, ochre residual inlays, cracks and abrasions.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is the Katanga, specifically the region of the Lubu River, hence the name (Baluba, which means the Lubas). ...


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Luba Shankadi neck support
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African art > Head rest > Luba neck press

The Shankadi belong to the Luba group, and have the same associations and structures. Their mostly realistic statuary is characterized by spectacular hairstyles, a smooth surface, lower limbs of lesser size. The hairstyle "en cascade" illustrates one of the different braided compositions fashionable in Zaire in the 1800s, highlighting the social status of the wearer. The female effigy symbolizes Luba royalty, the neck supports were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Hot brown oiled patina, ochre residue.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is the Katanga, specifically the Lubu River region, hence the name (Baluba, which means \


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Yaka Musaw neck support
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African art > Head rest > Yaka neck support

This type of neck-bearing called musaw or m-baambu, kept in the bedrooms, is one of the African tribal art objects incorporating the personal ritual charms of the matrilineal leaders and heads of the family in order to preserve their magnificent tribal headdresses. This bird would refer to the stork. Some of these sculptures had magical charges inserted into discrete cavities. Dark brown glossy patina.
Aerarchic and authoritarian, composed of fearsome warriors, Yaka society was ruled by lineage leaders with the right to life and death over their subjects. Hunting and the resulting prestige are an opportunity for the Yaka today to invoke ancestors and to resort to rituals using charms related to the institution .Khosi. The initiation society of young people is the n-khanda , which ...


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Seat caryatide Pende
African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Pende Stool

Reduced size for this personal furniture object where the foot takes the form of a female figure in a kneeling position. According to Marc Léo Félix, however, few are the seats of dignitaries, because they were buried with their holders. The face here presents the famous look 'zanze' with the half-closed eyes found on the hanging masks. Dark patina abraded.

The seed live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the have settled on the banks of the Kasai river downstream of Tshikapa. The influences of the neighbouring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu, were imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity the masks Mbuya, realistic, produced every ten years, have a festive function, and embody different characters, including the chef, the ...


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180.00

Luba Shankadi neck support
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African art > Head rest > Luba neck press

The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neck-bearings and stools consisting of a cariatidic figure and sometimes a cephalophe like here. In this case it is a female figure, the embodiment of the royalty and spirit of the ancestors, riding the animal. Antelope horns were used, loaded with magical ingredients, in therapeutic rituals. The neck supports were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Satin golden brown patina.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is the Katanga, specifically the region of the Lubu River, hence the name (Baluba, which means the Lubas). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of ...


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Yaka Musaw neck support
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Yaka headrest

This type of neck-bearing called musaw or m-baambu, kept in the bedrooms, is one of the African tribal art objects incorporating the personal ritual charms of the matrilineal leaders and heads of the family in order to preserve their magnificent tribal headdresses. This bird would refer to the stork. Some of these sculptures had magical charges inserted into discrete cavities. Dark brown glossy patina. Hierarchical and authoritarian, composed of fearsome warriors, Yaka society was governed by lineage leaders with the right to life and death over their subjects. Hunting and the resulting prestige are an opportunity for the Yaka today to invoke ancestors and to resort to rituals using charms related to the institution .Khosi. The initiation society of young people is the n-khanda , which is ...


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