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African art - Headdress Hat:

The hats usually worn by notables during tribal events are often sumptuous headdresses like the Bamileke Juju. Some hats worn by marabouts are adorned with all sorts of mystical materials.


Lega Cap
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Lega Cap

This type of headdress is worn by members of the highest ranks of the bwami secret society, governing the lega social structure, open to circumcised adults and their wives and who instruct their adherents in terms of moral perfection. These objects are part of the masengo, meaning that they are sacred and can therefore only be worn by initiates. The owner cannot part with it during his lifetime. Bwami has different degrees, with yananio and kindi being the highest. The materials used vary, it can be buttons of clothes, cowries, pearls or cocoa beans. On a carefully braided natural fiber cap, this headgear is entirely covered with manufactured buttons (Mukuba). This old skullcap is originally surmounted by elephant hair in reference, under an imperturbable appearance, to the destructive ...


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150.00

Lega Cap
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Lega Cap

This type of head ornament is intended for members of the upper echelons of the bwami secret society, governing the lega social structure. This society, which instructs its members in terms of moral perfection, is open to circumcised adults and their wives. These prestigious headdresses are part of the masengo, meaning that they are sacred and can therefore only be worn by initiates. The owner cannot part with it during his lifetime. Bwami has different degrees, with yananio and kindi being the highest. The materials used vary, they can be clothing buttons, cowrie shells, pearls or cocoa beans. Cowrie shells, an ancient currency in Africa, line a cap carefully woven from natural fibers. This type of headgear was originally topped with elephant hair in reference to the destructive power ...


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150.00

Juju Hat
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Juju Hat

Collection of French African art
During the elephant dance ceremony, called tso, members of the Kuosi society, also known as Kwosi, sported these impressive headdresses. These headdresses were part of a multi-colored costume that included a large beaded mask with large circular ears, mbap mteng, a cloth cloth, ndop, decorated with monkey fur, and a leopard belt. These dances were usually performed during festive ceremonies and funerals. Initially made with parrot feathers, these hats today use wild guinea fowl feathers, the rarity of which results in a high cost.
The feathers are attached to wooden strips covered with fabric, arranged around a circular frame consolidated by a wicker fiber basket. Kosi society, which was originally composed of valiant warriors, evolved into ...


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150.00

Juju Hat
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Juju Hat

Ex-collection of French African art
These imposing headdresses were traditionally worn by members of the Kuosi society, also known as Kwosi, during the elephant dance, tso. These headdresses were matched with a multi-colored costume including a large beaded mask with large circular ears, mbap mteng, a cloth cloth, ndop, decorated with monkey fur, and a leopard belt. The dances generally took place during festive ceremonies and funerals.
Initially made up of valiant warriors, Kosi society evolved into an association of wealthy notables acting in the name of royalty with the aim of regulating the social order. Headdresses were once made from parrot feathers, but today they use wild guinea fowl feathers, the rarity of which carries a high cost. The feathers are attached to ...


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150.00

Juju Hat
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Juju Hat

Collection of French African art
The magnificent Bamileke headdresses in African art represent prestigious adornments worn by notables, and this particular example is decorated with bright red feathers. These impressive headdresses were traditionally worn by members of the Kuosi society, also known as Kwosi, during the elephant dance, tso. These headdresses were worn in conjunction with a multi-colored costume including a large beaded mask with large circular ears, mbap mteng, a cloth cloth, ndop, decorated with monkey fur, and a leopard belt. The dances generally took place during festive ceremonies and funerals.
Originally composed of valiant warriors, Kosi society evolved into an association of wealthy notables acting in the name of royalty with the aim of regulating the ...


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150.00

Kuba Cap
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Kuba Cap

Ex-collection of African artBelgian
. This head ornament was worn by notable Kuba people on specific occasions. The thick hat is made of a raffia fiber textile garnished with multiple cowrie shells in contrast with spiral patterns made of pearls. These shells, a barter currency originally imported from the Indian Ocean by Hausa merchants, constitute a symbol of fertility and abundance.
br /> The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the high ranks of their society. Several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined designs including cups, drinking horns and goblets. The Lele are established in the west of the Kuba kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers. Intercultural exchanges between the Bushoong ...


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240.00

Mambila Cap
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Mambila Cap

Unusual object, this ceremonial hat, in conical basketry coated with colored pigments. It is embellished with a series of figures carved in the image of African statues Kiké ntadep, tadep.
Despite their small number, the thirty thousand Mambila (or Mambila, Mambere, Nor, Torbi, Lagubi, Tagbo, Tongbo, Bang, Ble, Juli, Bea)(the "men", in Fulani), settled in the northwest of Cameroon, created a large number of masks and statues easily identified by their heart-shaped faces. Although the Mambila believe in a creator god named Chang or Nama, they only worship their ancestors. Their leaders were buried in granaries like wheat as they were believed to symbolize prosperity. Masks and statues were not to be seen by women.


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480.00

Bamileke headdress
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Bamileke headdress

Sumptuous Bamileke headdresses in African art.
Prestigious African headdress, worn by notables, this example offers a trim of bright yellow feathers.
It was on the occasion of the elephant dance, tso ,that members of the Kuosi , Kwosi , society wore these impressive headdresses. They were worn over a multicolored costume consisting of a large beaded mask with large circular ears, mbap mteng ,a cloth fabric, ndop , decorated with monkey fur and a leopard belt. These dances were performed during festive ceremonies and funerals. The hats were once made from parrot feathers, now from wild guinea fowl, whose scarcity meant high cost. The feathers are attached to wooden strips covered with fabric, placed around a circular frame consolidated by a basket of wicker fiber. A ...


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Bamileke headdress
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Bamileke headdress

Sumptuous Bamileke headdresses in African art.
Prestigious African headdress, worn by notables, this example offers a trim of bright yellow feathers.
It was on the occasion of the elephant dance, tso ,that members of the Kuosi , Kwosi , society wore these impressive headdresses. They were worn over a multicolored costume consisting of a large beaded mask with large circular ears, mbap mteng ,a cloth fabric, ndop , decorated with monkey fur and a leopard belt. These dances were performed during festive ceremonies and funerals. The hats were once made from parrot feathers, now from wild guinea fowl, whose scarcity meant high cost. The feathers are attached to wooden strips covered with fabric, placed around a circular frame consolidated by a basket of wicker fiber. A ...


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Temporarily unavailable

Kuba headdress
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Kuba headdress

This type of head ornament is worn on certain occasions by Kuba notables to highlight their wealth and prestige. Particularly careful workmanship characterizes this headdress.
A braided skullcap made of natural fibers is stretched over the textile, which is entirely filled with cowrie shells, applied harmoniously, creating a dense and regular network ending in a bouquet at the top. These shells, a barter currency originally imported from the Indian Ocean by Hausa merchants, are a symbol of fertility and abundance.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the higher ranks of their society. Indeed, several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined designs including cups, drinking horns and beakers. The Lele are ...


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180.00

Hair Kuba
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Hair Kuba

African art Kuba.
-Coiffe consisting of raffia textile with a rigid circular frame. symbolizing wealth and fertility.
The Kuba and the tribes established between the Sankuru and Kasai rivers, including the Bushoong and Dengese also from the Mongo group, are renowned for the refinement of the prestigious objects created for members of the high ranks of their society. Several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic ceremonial objects with refined motifs, including cuts, drinking horns and cups. The Kuba, whose name means Lightning also produced African tools and weapons, including jet knives, which eventually became transaction values, and heavy war swords, Ilwoon. The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the Bushoong which are still ruled by a king today. It is the most ...


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280.00





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