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African art - Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam:

Clay jars are closely associated with the daily life of African populations. Made from the material of muddy ponds and rivers, the rather heterogeneous paste allows the production of objects with thick walls such as jars. The jars, often made of wood, are intended to receive offerings, medicinal plants, or divinatory gris-gris.


Dogon bronze ceremonial box
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Dogon box

The rider and his mount, symbols of power and wealth since they are rare, are a recurring theme in African art, particularly in Mali.

This ceremonial cup takes up the theme of the mythical ark in the Dogon genesis. Indeed, one of the Nommos , ancestors of the Dogon, resurrected by the creator god Amma , is said to have descended to earth carried by an ark metamorphosed into a horse. Ornamental motifs, such as wavelet friezes and references to the snake, adorn its contours.
Copper brown patina. The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, myths and legends. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living southwest of the Niger loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest ...

Dogon Ogo Banya Cup
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Dogon Cup

The emblematic cups of African Dogon art
Dogon pot for ceremonial use whose lid is decorated with the Hogon, a religious leader personified by the rider on his mount. Very fine linear motifs recall that the Nommo, mythical ancestor to whom the rider also refers, is a water god who taught weaving to humans(M. Buratti). Thick matte black patina, desiccation cracks. The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, myths and rituals. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living southwest of the Niger loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest of Ouahigouya). Their oldest religious leader, the Hogon, the highest authority of the Dogon people, paraded on his horse at the time of his enthronement ...


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Kongo Yombe carved box
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Yombe box

The lid of this container bears allegorical motifs, carved in the round, representing three figures including a maternity hospital sitting on a log. Desiccation cracks and abrasions.
The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombé were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rites, in particular by means of sculpted fetishes. The naturalistic art of the Bayombe, in addition to masks and nkisi fetishes , includes prestigious sculptures and objects associated with the Lemba cult, glorifying harmony and married life.
In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads of the borders between the current DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the ...


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Bangwa anthropomorphic cup
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bangwa statue

The rich production of African art among the populations of the Cameroonian Grassland is illustrated mainly by wood statuary: commemorative sculptures of kings, queens, princesses and titled servants, as well as the parents of twins.

Within the large Bamileke tribe in western Cameroon, the Bangwa constitute a small kingdom. The influence of the Bamileke on bangwa statuary is notable by relatively comparable facial features and morphology. This Bangwa figure, whose hollow abdomen acts as a receptacle, honors fertility. Ocher agglomerates line the internal walls of the cup.
Thick cracked patina, desiccation cracks and native restoration.

Typical of the Bamileke country, the Bangwa statues often represent fertility but also power and ...


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350.00

Ganda milk jug
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Ganda container

Sober and refined, with thin walls, this ancient container from East Africa was designed by a nomadic people. The latter was particularly decimated by the Islamic slave trade and by recurring internal wars. The groups of populations called "Bantu interlacustres", located between Lake Victoria and the Limpopo river, include the Ganda , Nyoro, Nkole, Soga, Toro, Hima, and the Tutsi of Rwanda and Burundi. Their cultures have similarities, like their artistic production and their objects of daily use. Apart from the prestigious vases created by the potter in the service of the king, named kujona , the Ganda of Uganda also produce containers for daily use, such as this object patinated by use.
Satin patina, abrasions and small accidents.


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280.00

Large Luba lid container
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Pot Luba

The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neck-bearings and stools made up of a cariatidic figure. They also carved containers of different kinds. The chef's ritual objects, charms and other fetishes, were stored in this type of large cephalomorphic container with a lid. Fully hollowed out, this sculpture consists of a spherical volume depicting a head whose headdress forms the neck. A rope holds the lid on the side handles. Medium brown patina very slightly abraded. Height on a base: 54 cm.

The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is the Katanga, specifically the region of the Lubu River, hence the name (Baluba, which means the Lubas). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of ...


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Lwena Mulondo ceramic jar
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Luena jar

Jar with a human figurative motif, adorned with a juxtaposition of checkerboards, and a face on which are inscribed the traditional scarifications formerly in use among the Lwena.
Dark brown slip.
Of Lunda origin, the Lwena (or even Lovale , or Luvale ) emigrated from Angola to Zaire in the 19th century, pushed back by the Chokwe. Some became slave traders, others, the Lovales, found refuge in Zambia and near the Zambezi in Angola. Their society is matrilineal, exogamous and polygamous. The Lwena have become known for their honey-colored sculptures, embodying figures of deceased ancestors and chiefs, and their masks linked to the initiation rites of the mukanda.


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280.00

Yoruba Medicine Pot
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Pot Yoruba

This pot of remedies, a basket covered with clay coating, closed by an anthropomorphic-patterned lid, was linked to the Ifa cult created by the Oyos of Nigeria and in connection with the egungun and Sango societies.
Used by the priest of Ifa, a sculpture relating to deities or orishas rises above the pot. Cauris, metal, and seed packets exacerbate the potency of the ingredients placed in the container.
Soruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name Nago. They are patrilineal, practice excision and circumcision. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the disappearance of the civilization Ifé and are still the basis of the political structure of the Yoruba. The Oyo created two cults centered ...


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Kwéré calabash container
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kwéré calabash

The round carved cap of this vessel shows a Kwere woman wearing a double sagittal crest. The eyes are inlaid with pearls, giving a piercing look. The attitude refers to fertility. Velvety patina.
The Zaramo and the tribes that surround them, such as the Kwere, have designed dolls that are generally associated with fertility, but to which other virtues are attributed. Its primary role is played during the period of seclusion of the young Zaramo initiate. The novice will behave towards the object as she would towards a child, and will dance with it during the closing ceremonies of the initiation. In the event that the young woman does not conceive, she will adopt the "child. Among the Zaramo and Kwere, this carved motif is repeated at the top of canes, decorates ritual objects ...


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Arsi milk pot Ethiopia
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Arsi pot

Honey, butter or milk pot, made of a coloquinte established on a basketry base. The pot is sheathed with leather straps, extended by a dense, careful weaving of straw, perfectly sealed with resin, and finished with carrying straps lined with cowries. This type of container, a kind of prestigious "crockery", was reserved for great festive occasions. The inner walls have a crusty surface for use.


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Luba Kiteya Cup
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Luba Cup

Figures embodying spirits, carved in the round, frame a cylindrical mboko container. This pot was for kaolin, associated with purity and the spiritual world. These vessels were used by various Luba societies, and groups of prophets, more generally by the mediums of the divination society Kilumbu , Bilumbu , or by the healers of the society Buhabo . It was, individually or collectively, to consult the spirits of the ancestors through specialists. This type of cup also played a role during the investiture of the Luba king.
Satin patina, cracks of desiccation.

The Lubas (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, thus the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a ...


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390.00

Double jarre Mangbetu
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Vases Mangbetu

Named 'generous' in African art, these pottery are intended to collect palm wine. These jars with globular bodies, equipped with handles, have cephalomorphic gullies arranged face to face. The faces are marked by subtle differences suggesting a couple. Oiled patina, black and smooth, abrasions.
asebli in the forest in northeastern Zaire, the Mangbetu kingdom has expressed itself through architectural works that impressed European visitors in the 19th century. Their furniture, weapons, adornments and statuary were imbued with a rare aesthetic quality. The Mangbetu story was based on the refinement of his court but also on cannibalistic customs. King Mangbetu Munza was so dubbed The cannibal king. The body lines on the characters, like those of the face, include the traditional ...


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240.00

Jarre Boa/Mangbetu
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Boa container

Vase with a neck showing a human head with large ears. Sets of incised motifs decorate the sides, which show female attributes. Brown slip with reddish glints. Abrasions. Related to the Mangbetu and Zande, the Boa inhabit the savannah in the north of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Their anthropomorphic figures were undoubtedly used as part of rites charged with combating the witchcraft of the ndoki society. They are known for their mask with oversized ears, perforated like the ear pavilions of the Eastern Boa, the "bavobongo ". It gave an impressive appearance to its wearer, accentuated by the contrast of colors. The African art mask kpongadomba of the Boa was ordered by the chief kumu who offered it to the most valiant warrior. It was then kept in the hut of his wife. Some ...


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140.00

Mangbetu terracotta vase
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African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Jarre Mangbetu

A globular body surmounted by a female head styled according to the barrels of the ethnic group affirms the elegance of mangbetu pottery, symbol of fertility. The motifs engraved on the surface echo the traditional scarifications. The work of ceramics, in West and Central Africa, is carried out by women, wives of blacksmiths in the majority of cases. The Mangbetu women, who also produced basketry, excelled in this art.
In the forest in northeastern Zaire, the Mangbetu kingdom has expressed itself through architectural works that impressed European visitors in the 19th century. Their furniture, weapons, adornments and statuary were imbued with a rare aesthetic quality. The Mangbetu story was based on the refinement of his court but also on cannibalistic customs. King Mangbetu Munza ...


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Dogon figurative box
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Dogon box

Decorated with bas-relief motifs and horse heads, this African art sculpture is believed to have been designed to store active medicinal preparations prepared according to the advice of the ancients who had been initiated into the science of trees or "jiridon". The figures of "nommos", primordial ancestors, and animal symbols are believed to activate the healing power of the actives. One of the Nommos, ancestors of men, resurrected by the creator god Amma, is said to have descended to earth carried by an ark metamorphosed into a horse. In addition, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious chief named Hogon, paraded on his horse during his enthronement because according to custom he should not set foot on the ground. In the region of the Sangha cliffs, inaccessible by ...


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Mortar with lid Pende
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Pende Mortar

Small mortar for spices, pigments, or therapeutic ingredients. The object is carved with different faces that take up the features of the traditional masks of the group. Golden brown satin patina. Slight residue of kaolin.
The Western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the Eastern have settled on the banks of the Kasai downstream from Tshikapa. The influences of the neighboring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba, and Salempasu have been imprinted on their extensive tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity the Mbuya masks, realistic ,produced every ten years, have a festive function, and embody different characters, including the chief, the diviner and his wife, the prostitute, the possessed, etc.... The masks of initiation and those of power, the ...


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240.00

Dogon bronze box with lid
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Dogon box

The iconic cups of African Dogon art
. Blacksmith artists Dogon form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim . Today they produce weapons, tools,and also work with wood. "Masters of fire", they are furthermore supposed to heal burns (Huib Blom). The Nommo, a protective ancestor evoked in different forms in Dogon iconography, is said to be an ancestor gifted with the ability to manifest himself in human or animal form, hence the frequent decorative motifs adorning the sculptures. The wavelet friezes are also symbolic. Greenish-gray patina. The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, myths and rituals. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living in the southwestern loop of the Niger in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near ...


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280.00

Box of oracles Gbékré sé Baoulé
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Baule Box

African divinatory art.
Destined for a practice still in use today in the Baule region of the southwest, the sculpture offers a mediating tutelary figure, supported on a circular receptacle with a floor. The sides of the container are decorated with parallel lines and eroded geometric patterns. A mouse, considered to be the messenger of the earth's deities, lived in the lower compartment of the object and the successive arrangement of the elements it moved was read as an answer to the question asked of the diviner. A metal plate was fitted under the box.
Velvety patina, speckled with ochre white.
Ref: Mathilde Buratti , "The boxes used for divination by mice".
During the 18th century, united under a single banner, this Akan people was, according to legend, guided by ...

Bura funeral urn
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Bura funerary urn

Remarkable, African Bura art includes three types of archaeological sites in the Niger Valley: sites with necropolises where coffin jars, funerary urns, etc ... Sites with ritual vocations where ceremonies were happening and the religious rites. The habitation sites where we find the usual objects. Herisse in his height of vertical lines composed of small circular reliefs, this conical receptacle was placed in the tomb of the deceased among personal effects like his weapons and clothing that he might need in the afterlife, among his bones and teeth. The piece has the same patterns placed horizontally around the perimeter of its lower base.


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Mangbetu figurative jar
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Mangbetu Pot

Vase with a neck showing a human head with large pierced ears. Sets of incised motifs decorate the sides. Black slip. Abrasions, broken handle. Ceramic work in West and Central Africa is carried out by women, the wives of blacksmiths in most cases. The Mangbetu women, who also produced basketry, excelled in this art.
Established in the forest in northeastern Zaire, the Mangbetu kingdom expressed itself through architectural works that impressed European visitors in the 19th century. Their furniture, weapons, ornaments and statuary were imbued with a rare aesthetic quality. Mangbetu history was indeed based on the refinement of its court but also on cannibal customs. King Mangbetu "Munza" was nicknamed "the cannibal king". The ethnologist G.A. Schweinfurth in 1870 described the ...


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290.00

Bakongo powder flask
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kongo Pear

The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombé were largely influenced by the Kongo Kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rituals, especially by means of carved fetishes nkondo nkisi.
Piriform container with a cap, intended to hold gunpowder for wooden rifles. This black powder was imported from Europe, making it a luxurious commodity that was carefully preserved. This powder, which was also attributed with magical virtues, often completed the ingredients of ritual fetishes. It is surmounted by a seated figure. This figure refers to the ancestors of the clan. Juxtaposition of decorative motifs engraved on the sides of the box. Slightly satin patina.
Ref : "La Maternité dans l'art d'Afrique noire" Massa ; "l'Art tribal d'Afrique noire" Bacquart.


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