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African art - Maternity, statues, bronze, wood:

Motherhood is a recurring theme in African art. The symbolism is always the same, whether the child is carried on the back, in the arms, breastfeeding or resting on the knees, it is hieratic. Motherhood is not the emotional expression between the child and his mother, but it is a sign of fertility and reveals an inexhaustible source of meanings ranging from the family nucleus to politics through religion.


Baoule statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Baoule statue

Property of the diviner komienfoué , often involved in divinatory practices of Mbra , this female effigy evoking a seated oussou , a "genius of nature" , linked to fertility, is shown standing, her child on the back. A headdress arranged in multiple shells, checkerboard scarifications, pearl adornments, and the vigor of calves adapted to agricultural work, are part of the features of Baoulé statuary.
Desiccation cracks. Polychrome patina, locally abraded.
Two types of statues are produced by the baoulé in the ritual framework: The statues Waka-Sona , "being of wood" in baoulé, evoke a seated oussou , being of the Earth. They are part of a type of statues intended for use as a medium tool by the Komian diviners, the latter being selected by the asye usu spirits ...


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Mangbetu statue
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Mangbetu statue

The linear motifs running through this statuette refer to the traditional paintings of the ethnic group, inspired by the tattoos of the neighboring Asua pygmies and which evolved according to circumstances. Among the Mangbetu from an early age, children of the upper classes also suffered compression of the cranial box, held tight by raffia ties. Later, the hair was "knitted" on wicker strands and a headband encircled the forehead in order to bring out the hair and constitute this majestic headdress accentuating the elongation of the skull. The ancients call beli the anthropomorphic figures embodying ancestors, stored out of sight, and comparable to those belonging to their secret society nebeli.

Orange-brown patina, cracks and losses.
The Mangebetu kingdom in ...


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290.00

Baga statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Baga statue

Realistically crafted figures sculpted from traditional baga canons. Kneeling, the mother presents a young initiate whose hairstyle is similar to hers.
Satin patina, nuanced with browns, abrasions and cracks from desiccation.
Mixed with the Nalu and the Landuman, the Baga live along the coasts of Guinea-Bissau in areas of swamps that are flooded six months a year. These Baga groups settled on the coast and living from rice growing are made up of seven sub-groups, including the Baga Kalum, Bulongic, Baga sitem, Baga Mandori, etc... They believe in a creator god called Nagu, Naku, that they do not represent. Along with the extinction of male initiations since the 1950s, women's societies organize danced ritual ceremonies during which possession and divination sessions ...


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350.00

Dogon statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Dogon statue

Carried on the head during the funeral of women, this type of statues could be seen by the public. Apart from the ceremonies, they remained under the care of the dean of women. Characterized by its slender forms, breastfeeding her child in a seated position, this figure evokes the female ancestor and is invoked for the purpose of fertility. Libations have left this piece with a dull dark patina, abraded in places. Desication cracks.
Carved for the most part on order placed by a family, Dogon statues can also be the object of worship on the part of the whole community when they commemorate, for example, the foundation of the village. However, their functions remain little known. Alongside Islam, Dogon religious rites are organized around four main cults. According to Dogon ...


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490.00

Bambara statue
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African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Bambara statue

Sitting on a seat, this sculpted figure incorporates a fertility cult associated with the Djo, or Do, widespread in central Mali. Long called "Queen", this type of statue participated every seven years in ceremonies during which they were presented to women without children. The latter washed the sculptures then anointed them with shea.
A mat from the headdress is missing, desication cracks, small accidents.
The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and the Malinke. They believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala who maintains order in the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, who gave all the qualities to men and who makes the fruits of the earth grow. Large ...


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Baule Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Baule Statue

French African art collection.
African female effigy of a "genius of nature", represented by this motherhood in a seated position. A headdress arranged in multiple shells, scarifications scattered on the body, bracelets, necklaces of fine pearls, and the vigor of calves adapted to agricultural work, are part of the features of Baoulé statuary. Two types of statues are produced by the Baoulé in the ritual context: The Waka-Sona statues, "being of wood" in Baoulé, evoke a seated oussou, being of the earth. They are one of a type of statues intended to be used as medium tools by Komian soothsayers, the latter being selected by asye usu spirits in order to communicate revelations from the afterlife. The second type of statues are the spouses of the beyond, masculine, the Blolo bian or ...


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130.00

Kongo figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kongo figure

Small statuette carved in the Kongo style, associated with the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure. The child would embody the matrilineal transmission of power. These effigies frequently formed the carved pattern atop chiefs' canes. Glossy dark brown patina.
Desication crack. A clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternities. The use of this type of sculpture remains unknown. Among the Kongo , the nganga was responsible for the rituals by activating a spiritual force with an nkondi (pl. nkissi). The term nkisi was then used to designate the notions of "sacred" or "divine". The most influential category of "minkisi kongo" consisted of ...


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290.00

Baule statue
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Baule statue

A communication tool with the spiritual world or blolo supposed to promote fertility, this sculpture offers the canons of Baoulé beauty, braided hairstyle collected in shells, scarified motifs in relief, round projecting calves.
Burgundy brown satin patina.
These figures received offerings and oily libations. Two types of statues are produced by the baoulé in the ritual context: The Waka-Sona statues, "being of wood" in Baoulé, evoke a assié oussou, being of the earth. They are one of a type of statues intended to be used as medium tools by Komien soothsayers, the latter being selected by the asye usu spirits in order to communicate revelations from beyond. The second type of statues are the spouses of the afterlife, male, the Blolo bian or female, the blolo bia.
"The ...


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280.00

Makonde statue
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Makonde statue

Female figure that the weight of a child, on the back, seems to bend. The face presents the traditional deformation of the lips due to the labret. The tattoos were traced with beeswax, and scarified patterns were also made for aesthetic purposes. These statues symbolizing an ancestor would refer to the creation, according to which the first Makonde man would have carved a female image who became the mother of his children and who has been revered ever since. Eroded black patina, desiccation cracks and losses.
The Makonde, a matrilineal Bantu people of northern Mozambique and southern Tanzania, wore helmet masks called lipiko, mapiko, during initiation ceremonies for young people . The Makonde venerate an ancestor, which explains the abundance of relatively naturalistic female ...


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340.00

Dogon maternity
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Dogon maternity

This statuette of African art Dogon, carved in dense wood, would embody a female ancestor presenting an infant. Witness to the influence of Islam in the region, his necklace of amulets, or korte Grainy gray beige patina. Desication cracks.

These statues, sometimes embodying the nyama of the deceased, are placed on altars of ancestors and take part in various rituals including those of the sowing and harvesting periods. Alongside Islam, Dogon religious rites are organized around four main cults: the Lébé, relating to fertility, under the spiritual authority of the Hogon, the Wagem, ancestor worship under the authority of the patriarch, the ...


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340.00

Kongo Pfemba maternity figure
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Pfemba figure

Traditional Kongo sculpture, this statuette embodies the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure, as evidenced by the scarifications of the bust. The child would embody the matrilineal transmission of power.
The Yombe adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, with lozenges related to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The mouth reveals filed teeth, the gaze indicates the grandmother's ability to discern occult things. The use of this type of sculpture remains unknown. They frequently formed the carved pattern at the top of chiefs' canes. Satin black patina. Minor abrasions.
A clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternities. ...


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280.00

Dogon Maternity
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Dogon Maternity

This sculpture of African dogon art, carved from dense wood, personifies a female ancestor. She sits on a stool, a child on her lap. The necklace of amulets, or korte, which she wears around her neck and which contains verses from the Qur'an, testifies to the influence of Islam in the region. Beautiful matte patina. Grainy, abraded surface. Desication cracks. Acquired after 1950 by the owner in a German gallery.

These statues, sometimes embodying the nyama of the deceased, are placed on the altars of ancestors and participate in various rituals including those of the seed and harvest periods. Parallel to Islam, the dogon religious rites are organized around four main cults: the Lebe, relating to fertility, under the spiritual authority of the Hogon, the Wagem, cult of ...


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320.00

Idoma statue
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Idoma statue

Altar figure belonging to a widespread cult among the animist Idoma as well as among the Igala and the Yoruba of the South, supposed to promote fertility and protect offspring. These statues which benefited from offerings were preserved in sanctuaries. The bust bears the motifs associated with traditional tribal scarifications and tattoos.
Matte grainy polychromy.
The Idoma live at the confluence of the Bénué and the Niger. Numbering 500,000, they are farmers and traders. There are Igbo, Cross River and Igala influences in their art and customs and it is often difficult to distinguish them from their neighbours. Royal lineage members of their oglinye society, glorifying courage, wear masks and crests during funerals and festivities. They also produce fertility statues ...


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390.00

Statue Yoruba
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Yoruba

This sculpture of African tribal art was destined to be enthroned on an altar. Facilitating communication with the sacred, it reminds the divinity of its duties towards men. The child she holds on her lap symbolizes protection and fertility. Wearing a high crest, she sports the keloids of the Yoruba nobles. The bulging eyes, fleshy lips, are also distinctive markers of Yoruba tribal statuary. Misses on the base. Scabby patina locally flaked. Desiccation cracks. The Yoruba practiced the slave trade with the Europeans and in particular the Portuguese before being completely subjugated to the British following a long period of infighting between the various kings or oba in power. The main Yoruba cults are the Gélédé , Epa , Ogboni , and the Esu cult, through which a very wide ...


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Yoruba Polychrome Maternity
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African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Yoruba Polychrome Maternity

This female tribal altar art sculpture features a well-preserved polychromy. She is depicted sitting in a seat on a circular base. Facilitating communication with the sacred, it reminds the deity of its duties to men. Through the child she holds on her lap, she symbolizes the protection of her people and fertility. Wearing a high crest, she also wears the three deep keloids of the Yoruba nobles on each of the cheeks. The globular eyes, fleshy lips, are also distinctive markers of Yoruba tribal statuary. Her attire, necklace and bracelets, reflect her social rank.
Sensitable, a matte, grainy patina covers the wood, which is desiccized due to cracking.
The Yoruba engaged in the slave trade with the Europeans and in particular the Portuguese before being completely subsermissed ...


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Kongo maternity
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kongo maternity

A sculpted miniature of the Kongo, this female effigy embodies the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure. The child would embody the matrilineal transmission of power. The Yombe adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, with lozenges related to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. These effigies frequently formed the carved pattern atop chiefs' canes. Glossy dark brown patina.
A clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternities. The use of this type of sculpture remains unknown. Among the Kongo , the nganga was responsible for the rituals by activating a spiritual force with an nkondi (pl. nkissi). The term nkisi was then ...


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180.00

Ndengese statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ndengese statue

The mother incarnating the ancestor of the clan is represented kneeling. The flared hairstyle, surmounted by a summit horn, forms a distinctive attribute of the hairstyles acquired by the Totshi chiefs belonging to the ikoho association and evokes particular proverbs. It symbolizes respect, intelligence and maturity. An intricate network of scarifications, corresponding to a symbolic graphic design, and others purely decorative, are inscribed in relief on the body. Velvety, matte, brown patina. Desication erosions and cracks.br />
People of Central Africa established in Kasaï, neighbor of the Kuba, the Ndengese or Dengese form one of the clans resulting from a common ancestor Mongo, some of them being from the Upper Nile. They produced primitive art statues with absent ...


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Statue Chokwe
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Chokwe

Statue associated with therapeutic cult type Hamba , this sculpture Chokwe or Lwena embodies a female ancestor supposed to guarantee fertility or healing. These figures were arranged around the altar muyombo, a tree at the foot of which sacrifices and offerings were once made. Sculptures such as figures made in sticks or poles ( Mbunji or mbanji), planted in the ground, were also associated. The related ethnic groups had the same type of altar, a witness before which rituals, oaths and important transactions were concluded. (Source: Chokwe, B. Wastiau)The character who also depicts the second wife of legendary chef Chibinda Ilunga sports a bulging hairstyle like a helmet and metal adornments. Smooth patina with matte granular pigments. Abrasions of the character's fingers. Xylophage ...


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Chokwe, Luvale maternity statue
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African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Chokwe statue

A statue associated with the Hamba type of therapeutic cult, this Chokwe or Lwena sculpture embodies a female ancestor believed to guarantee fertility or healing. These figures were arranged around the muyombo altar, a tree at the base of which sacrifices and offerings were once performed. Related ethnic groups had this same type of altar, a witness before which rituals, oaths and important transactions were concluded.
The figure would also depict the second wife of the mythical chief Chibinda Ilunga
Smooth mahogany gilt plate. Localized cracks at the base. Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwe were then subjected to the Lunda empire from which they inherited a new hierarchical system and the sacredness of power. The Chokwe did not have a ...


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Fertility statuette Lwena
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Luena Maternity

Female figure associated with the mythical female ancestor, and which would intervene on human fertility and land fertility. The face forms a miniature replica of the powerful mask mukishi wa pwo nyi cijingo ca tangwa wearing the kambu ja tota. Chokwe and Their Bantu Neighbours Rodrigues de Areia.) golden clear patine. Shard on the mouth.
bred in Lunda, the Lwena , Luena, emigrated from Angola to Zaire in the 19th century, repelled by the Chokwe. When some became slave traders, others, the Lovale, found refuge in Zambia. Their society is matrilineal, exogamous and polygamous. The Lwena became known for their sculptures depicting figures of deceased ancestors and chiefs, and their masks related to the initiation rites of the mukanda . Their sculpture was largely influenced by that of ...


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Maternity Kongo Yombe Pfemba
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African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Phemba Statue

Sculpture Kongo realistic type, named Phemba or Pfemba, she embodies the ancestor of the clan, female figure mediator. Children would embody the matrilineal transmission of power. Scarifications dot his bust. The Yombe adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, with diamonds in relation to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The mouth reveals traditionally lined teeth, the gaze evokes the ability of the ancestor to discern occult things. Smooth black skate with grenats.br/>Clan reflections of the Kongo group, the Yombe established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternity. The use of this type of sculpture remains unknown.
Shach the Kongo, nganga was in charge of the rituals by ...





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