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African art - Maternity:

Motherhood is a recurring theme in African art. The symbolism is always the same, whether the child is carried on the back, in the arms, breastfeeding or resting on the knees, it is hieratic. Motherhood is not the emotional expression between the child and his mother, but it is a sign of fertility and reveals an inexhaustible source of meanings ranging from the family nucleus to politics through religion.


Lulua Maternity
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Lulua Maternity

Scarifications abound on the body and the face of this naturalist African statue whose child is carried on the hip. These "maternities" and statuettes were supposed to protect the child and his mother. Grainy matte patina.
The different types of Luluwa, Lulua, or even Béna Lulua statues, with multiple scarifications, glorify local chiefs, motherhood, fertility and the female figure. This sculptural art was subject to the influences of neighboring ethnic groups (Chokwe, Luba, Kuba, ...)
It is in the south of the Democratic Republic of Congo that the Lulua, or Béna Lulua, settled from West Africa. Their social structure, based on caste, is similar to that of the Luba. They produced few masks, but mostly statues of ancestors representing the ideal warrior, mulalenga wa nkashaama, ...


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140.00

Baule Statue
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Baule Statue

Ex-French collection African tribal art .
Statue depicting a young woman breastfeeding her child. The keloid scars, strings of pearls, and sophisticated hairstyle indicate her status. These statues were kept on the bo osu altar where sacrifices were made to the spirits. Chipped grainy patina.
Two types of statues are produced by the baoulé in the ritual context: The Waka-Sona statues, "being of wood" in Baoulé, evoke an assié oussou, being of the earth. They are part of a type of statue intended to be used as a medium tool by the komien diviners, the latter being selected by the asye usu spirits in order to communicate revelations from the beyond. Around sixty ethnic groups populate Ivory Coast, including the Baoulé, in the center, Akans from Ghana, a people of the ...


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240.00

Lumbu statue
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Lumbu statue

The statues of the Kongo clans of the northeast of Mayombe.
The small Kunyi group, surrounded by the Beembe, Yombe and Lumbu in the Democratic Republic of Congo, is renowned in African art for its sculptures embodying founding ancestors, notables or clan leaders, many of them being represented kneeling. Some Lumbu statues are hollowed out in order to receive ancestral relics or symbolic ingredients. This figurative female figure wears diamond-shaped keloids. Abraded kaolin patina, desiccation cracks and erosions.


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280.00

Kongo statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kongo statuette

French collection of African art.
The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombé were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rites, in particular by means of sculpted nkondo nkisi fetishes.
African statuette evoking the mythical ancestor which is linked to fertility cults. Shiny red-brown patina. Very slight abrasions. The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by the ntotela king. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary with codified gestures in relation to their vision of the world.
Ref. : ...


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150.00

Kongo Statue
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Kongo Statue

French collection of African art. African sculpture depicting subjects very skilled in acrobatics. The Vili produced a variety of sculptures for individual use nkisi, to which multiple virtues were attributed, and anecdotal statues such as this example symbolizing an ancestor of the clan.
Glossy patina, matte blackened areas, restorations. The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, led by king ntotela . Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary with codified gestures in relation to their vision of the world. Present along the Gabonese coast, the Vili broke away from the Kongo kingdom ...


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380.00

Yoruba Maternity
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Yoruba Maternity

Intended to sit on an altar, this motherhood presenting an offering cup is represented standing, unlike the majority of Yoruba female figures. Resinous ritual patina, desiccation crack (headdress). Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, the Yoruba religion is based on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the disappearance of the Ifé civilization and are still the basis of the political structure of the Yoruba . The Oyo created two cults centered on the Egungun and Sango societies, still active, which worship their gods, the Orisa, through ceremonies making call for masks, statuettes, scepters and divination supports. The slave trade helped spread Yoruba beliefs across continents.


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240.00

Kongo figure
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Kongo figure

Among the regalia of the chiefs, this type of African Kongo maternity embodies, according to the scarifications of the bust, the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure. The child would embody the matrilineal transmission of power.
The Yombe adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, with lozenges related to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The mouth reveals filed teeth, the gaze indicates the grandmother's ability to discern occult things. The use of this type of sculpture remains unknown. They frequently formed the carved pattern at the top of chiefs' canes. Satin patina. Cracks, erosions.
A clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes ...


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160.00

Congo figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Congo figure

Ex-collection Italian African tribal art.

Tribal sculpture Kongo depicting a woman sitting cross-legged, supporting a child. She embodies the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure. The Yombe adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, with diamond patterns related to proverbs glorifying work and social unity, such as those that dot her bust. The mouth shows traditionally filed teeth and the gaze indicates the ancestor's ability to perceive the beyond, to discern hidden things. This type of statuette also adorned the top of the canes of prestige, mwala. Golden brown satin patina. Cracks and abrasions. Belonging to the group Kongo , the Yombe are established on the West African coast, in the southwest of the Republic of Congo and Angola. Their statuary includes ...


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280.00

Ashanti Maternity
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Ashanti Maternity

Belgian private collection of African art Jan Putteneers.

Seated female representations from Côte d'Ivoire and Ghana are usually queens. A particularity of this piece is that this woman is carrying her child in her arms.
This one is removable like the stool. The latter with a curved seat is typical of the akan.
seats. The patina is clear and slightly worn in places.
The features of the face are marked with black color giving a realistic look, breathing life into the large black pupils.

The Akan people are subdivided into several famous subgroups spread near the coast in Ivory Coast and Ghana, having become rich through the trade of precious metals and slaves during contacts with Westerners and in particular the Portuguese who were the ...


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580.00

Pfemba Maternity
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Pfemba Maternity

Figurative tribal sculpture of the Kongo , this female effigy embodies the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure, evidenced by the scarifications of the bust. The child within embodies the matrilineal transmission of power. The Yombe adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, with diamonds in relation to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The mouth reveals traditionally lined teeth, the eyes seem exorbitant, underlining the ancestor's ability to discern occult things. The use of this type of sculpture remains unknown. Black patina, few cracks.
Clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternity. The use of this type of sculpture remains ...


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280.00

Yombe Maternity
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Yombe Maternity

The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombé were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rites, in particular by means of sculpted nkondo nkisi fetishes.
Sculpted figure of the mythical ancestor which would be linked to fertility cults. . Red-brown patina, white clay residue. Old restorations on the arms. Erosions and desiccation cracks. The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by the ntotela king. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary with codified gestures in relation to their vision of the world. This king, also called ...


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190.00

Dogon maternity
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Dogon maternity

This statuette of African art Dogon, carved in dense wood, would embody a female ancestor presenting an infant. Witness to the influence of Islam in the region, his necklace of amulets, or korte Grainy gray beige patina. Desication cracks.

These statues, sometimes embodying the nyama of the deceased, are placed on altars of ancestors and take part in various rituals including those of the sowing and harvesting periods. Alongside Islam, Dogon religious rites are organized around four main cults: the Lébé, relating to fertility, under the spiritual authority of the Hogon, the Wagem, ancestor worship under the authority of the patriarch, the ...


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260.00

Yombe Maternity
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yombe Maternity

Referring to the mythical African ancestor associated with fertility cults, this female statuette offers a scarified bust. These cuts, made using needles, knives and razors, were then coated with charcoal or ashes to accelerate healing and form protruding patterns. The Yombe also decorated their textiles, mats and loincloths, with diamonds in relation to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The infant would embody the matrilineal transmission of power.
Satin light brown patina. Cracks.
In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads between present-day DRC, Angola and Gabon.
A clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the west African coast, in the southwest of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. ...


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150.00

Kongo Maternity Statuette
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Kongo Maternity Statuette

The child presented by this type of African effigy would symbolize the matrilineal transmission of power. The female ancestor of the clan constitutes for the Kongo groups a mediating figure. Maternity figures were frequently carved atop chiefs' canes. Shiny mahogany red patina. Desication cracks, erosions.
Clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the West African coast, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternities. The use of this type of sculpture remains unknown. Among the Kongo , the nganga was responsible for the rituals by activating a spiritual force with an nkondi (pl. nkissi). The term nkisi was then used to designate the notions of "sacred" or "divine".
Source: "the Kongo gesture" Ed. Dapper ...


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150.00

Kongo figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kongo figure

Realistic Kongo type sculpture named Phemba or Pfemba. This is the ancestor of the clan, a mediating female figure. The infant would embody the matrilineal transmission of power. Scarifications dot the back of the mother. The Yombe indeed adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, with diamonds related to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The glazed look symbolizes clairvoyance. Smooth black patina with garnet reflections. Erosions.

Clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternities. The use of this type of sculpture remains unknown.
Sources: "the Kongo gesture" Ed. Dapper Museum; "Treasures of Africa" Museum of Tervuren; "The ...


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180.00

Dogon Statue
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Dogon Statue

This sculpture of African art Dogon, carved in dense wood, personifies a hermaphrodite ancestor of which a miniature replica represents the child. The posture of the subject differentiates this rare Dogon statue. Dry, matte and cracked patina.

These statues, sometimes embodying the nyama of the deceased, are placed on ancestor altars and take part in various rituals, including those of the sowing and harvesting periods.
According to Dogon cosmogony, the first primordial ancestors of Dogon, called Nommo, were the bisexual water gods. They were created in heaven by the creator god Amma and descended from heaven to earth in an ark.
The Nommo is said to have founded the eight lineages of Dogon and instilled weaving, the art of blacksmithing, and agriculture to their human ...


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450.00

Dogon Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Dogon Statue

Female statue carved into angular volumes, sitting on a four-legged stool. This African sculpture invoked for the purpose of fertility relates to the female ancestor. Worn on the head at women's funerals, these statues could be viewed by the public. Apart from the ceremonies, they remained under the care of the dean of women. Native restoration (metal staple). Desication erosions and cracks.
Carved for the most part on order placed by a family, Dogon statues can also be the object of worship on the part of the whole community when they commemorate, for example, the foundation of the village. However, their functions remain little known. Alongside Islam, Dogon religious rites are organized around four main cults: the Lébé, relating to fertility, under the spiritual authority of the ...


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480.00

Yoruba Maternity
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Yoruba Maternity

Polychrome naturalist statue of the Yoruba type. Communication with the afterlife rested on a maternal figure who embodied for the Yoruba people one of the many female goddesses, the goddess of the earth Onilé ("owner of the House"), guarantor of longevity, peace, and resources, and linked to the powerful Ogboni society among the Yoruba Egba and Ijebu. She could also embody Orunmila, goddess of divination.
Intended to be enthroned on an altar, this type of sculpture was venerated by the members of the powerful Ogboni society, or Osugbo, responsible for justice.
Abraded crusty patina, desiccation cracks.
Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, the Yoruba religion relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose ...


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380.00

Senufo Statue
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Senufo Statue

African tribal art Senoufo.
Embodying "the Old Mother" feeding the initiates of the Poro, the statue opposite has the distinctive signs of her rank. Polychrome patina, erosions.
br /> The Senoufos, the name given to them by French settlers, are mainly made up of farmers who have dispersed between Mali, Ivory Coast, and Burkina Faso. Senufo villages are made up of clusters of dwellings called katiolo. Each of them has its own Poro association which introduces young boys from the age of seven in a succession of three cycles lasting seven years. They gather in a sacred enclosure called sinzanga located near the village, among the trees. When one of the members of the Poro died, the statues called pombibele were exhibited. Although exclusively male, the Poro society in fact ...


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350.00

Kongo Statue
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Kongo Statue

In the Kongo clans, this type of African effigy embodies the female ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure. The child would symbolize the matrilineal transmission of power. The Yombe decorated their textiles, mats and loincloths, with diamonds, in relief on the shoulders of the character. These motifs refer to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. Maternity figures were frequently carved atop chiefs' canes. Black patina. Desication cracks, erosions.
A clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternities. The use of this type of sculpture remains unknown. Among the Kongo , the nganga was responsible for the rituals by activating a spiritual ...


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230.00

Yoruba figure
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Yoruba figure

Intended to be enthroned on an altar, this work of African art, by facilitating communication with the sacred, symbolically reminds the divinity of its duties towards men. It features the keloids of Yoruba nobles, distinctive markers of Yoruba tribal statuary. Spotted satin patina. Desication cracks.
The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose following the disappearance of the Ifé civilization and are still the basis of the political structure of the Yoruba . The Oyo created two cults centered on the Egungun and Sango societies, still active, who venerate their gods, the Orisa, through ceremonies call for masks, statuettes, scepters and divination supports.

The main Yoruba cults are the Gélédé, Epa, Ogboni cults, and the Esu cult, through which a very wide variety of ...


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180.00





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