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African art - Maternity, statues, bronze, wood:

Motherhood is a recurring theme in African art. The symbolism is always the same, whether the child is carried on the back, in the arms, breastfeeding or resting on the knees, it is hieratic. Motherhood is not the emotional expression between the child and his mother, but it is a sign of fertility and reveals an inexhaustible source of meanings ranging from the family nucleus to politics through religion.


Maternity ward Baule Waka Sona
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African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Baoule statue

Probably the embodiment of a female goddess, this figure of a young woman, depicted seated on a royal seat, is nursing her child. Traditional keloid scars are carefully chiseled, jewelry indicates her status, and braids gathered into hulls form a refined hairstyle. These statues were kept on the bo osu altar where sacrifices were made to the spirits. Speckled patina.
Two types of statues are produced by the Baule in the ritual setting: Waka-Sona statues, "being of wood" in Baule, evoke an assié oussou, being of the earth. They are part of a type of statues intended to be used as a medium tool by the diviners komien, the latter being selected by the spirits asye usu in order to communicate revelations from the beyond. The second type of statues, made according to the ...


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Statuette Pfemba Congo Yombe
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Pfemba statuette

A sculpted miniature of the Kongo , this female effigy embodies the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure, evidenced by the scarifications of the bust. The child within embodies the matrilineal transmission of power. The Yombe adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, with diamonds in relation to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The mouth reveals traditionally lined teeth, the eyes seem exorbitant, underlining the ancestor's ability to discern occult things. The use of this type of sculpture remains unknown. They were, however, a frequent form of the pattern carved at the top of the heads' canes. Dark brown patina, ochre residue. Fissures.br /Clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in ...


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180.00

Kongo Yombe Pfemba figure
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Kongo figure

A carved figurine of the Kongo, this female effigy embodies the clan ancestor, a mediating figure.
The child embodies the matrilineal transmission of power.
The mouth reveals traditionally filed teeth, the eyes seem exorbitant, underlining the capacity of the ancestress to discern occult things.
The use of this type of carving is not well known. However, they frequently formed the motif carved at the top of the chiefs' canes. Light brown patina. Cracks and abrasions.
A clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the West African coast, in the southwestern Republic of the Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternities. Among the Kongo , the nganga took charge of rituals by activating a spiritual force with a nkondi ...


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110.00

Chokwe, Luvale maternity statue
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Chokwe statue

A statue associated with the Hamba type of therapeutic cult, this Chokwe or Lwena sculpture embodies a female ancestor believed to guarantee fertility or healing. These figures were arranged around the muyombo altar, a tree at the base of which sacrifices and offerings were once performed. Related ethnic groups had this same type of altar, a witness before which rituals, oaths and important transactions were concluded.
The figure would also depict the second wife of the mythical chief Chibinda Ilunga
Smooth mahogany gilt plate. Localized cracks at the base. Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwe were then subjected to the Lunda empire from which they inherited a new hierarchical system and the sacredness of power. The Chokwe did not have a ...


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380.00

Senoufo du Poro Kraamkliniek
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Senufo statuette

This statuette of maternity, a female effigy seated on a stool, breastfeeding her child, is represented with braids assembled in a stylized pattern. This sculpted scene generally symbolizes the initiate feeding on the knowledge of the mother goddess. Irregular blackish patina, satin, erosions.
The Senufos , a name given to them by the French colonists, are mostly composed of farmers who are scattered between Mali, the Ivory Coast, and Burkina Faso. Councils of elders, led by an elected chief, administer the Senufo villages. Governed by matrilineal traditions, they are composed of clusters of dwellings named katiolo .
At the time of the death of one of the members of the Poro initiation society, statues named pombibele were exhibited. Although exclusively male, the Poro ...


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150.00

Kongo Phemba Maternity
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue of Congo

A subgroup of the Kongo , the Yombe, based on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola, are characterized by a statuary in which various figures of motherhood abound: round headdresses or pointed, mouth open on slender teeth, sometimes glazed gaze in which the pupils are clearly visible, characters kneeling, standing, sitting. Relief scarifications adorn the bust of the effigies, such as the bust of this Phemba statue. These cuts, made using needles, knives and razors, were then sprayed with coal or ash to accelerate healing. The mother sits in a suit on a circular base, an infant on her lap. The distinctive elements of the Kongo are the cheffal cap "mpu", the wearing of bracelets and a band compressing the chest. This mediating object was used ...


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190.00

Yoruba maternity figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba figure

This sculpture of African tribal art is supposed to facilitate communication with the sacred, and reminds the divinity of its duties towards men. It symbolizes the protection of the people and fertility. Wearing a high crest, she also has the deep keloids of the Yoruba nobles on her face. The bulging eyes, fleshy lips, are also distinctive markers of Yoruba tribal statuary. Her finery, necklace and bracelets, reflect her social rank.
Grainy polychrome patina. The Yoruba practiced the slave trade with the Europeans and in particular the Portuguese before being completely subjugated to the British following a long period of internal struggles between the different kings or obas in place. The main Yoruba cults are the Gélédé , Epa , Ogboni , and the Esu cult, through which a ...


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240.00

Ovimbundu maternity figure
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ovimbundu statue

Sculpture featuring a young OviMbundu woman whose child is sucking on her breast. The face without eyes, whose forehead bears a single arabesque scarification, is hollowed out into a heart. As for the hairstyle, it evokes the one, fashioned with oil and red ochre, of young girls nyaneka following the efuko ritual.
This type of sculpture may have been associated with female initiation rituals, fertility, or divinatory rites.
Oiled patina with orange highlights, desiccation cracks.
. It is on the Benguéla plateau in Angola that the Ovimbudu , Ovimbundu , composed of farmers and herders, have been established for several centuries. Forming the largest ethnic group in Angola, they belong to the Bantu speakers, such as the Nyaneka , Handa , Nkhumbi , and ...


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Maternity figure Asye usu Baule
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African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Baule statue

Ex-collection of French African tribal art.
For the Baoule, seeing a woman's genitals can be fatal for a man. The depiction of a female figure, naked, unclothed by a loincloth of cloth, forms a threat. She is probably the embodiment of a female goddess. Represented seated, featuring a child, the woman wears traditional keloid scars, glass beaded necklaces and a hairstyle whose chiseled braids on the wood form large shells. Brilliant dark brown patina. Lack of base.

Two types of statues are produced by the Baoulé in the ritual framework: The Waka-Sona statues, be wooden in baoulé, evoke a silish oussou, being from the earth. They are part of a type of statues intended to be used as a medium tool by the soothsayers komian, the latter being selected by the spirits asye usu ...

Dan Lü mei Maternity
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African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Dan statue

Succession of curves for this figure of Dan maternity camped on powerful legs, and whose child clings to the back.
The curved face, surmounted by a refined headdress streaked with braids, recalls dance masks, while numerous scarifications are imprinted on the bust. Lustrous black patina, locally encrusted with residual kaolin.
For the Dan of the Ivory Coast, also called Yacouba, two very distinct universes are opposed: that of the village, composed of its inhabitants and its animals, and that of the forest, its vegetation and the animals and spirits that populate it. Gifts of women, food, festive ceremonies and an honorable status were formerly rewarded to the Dan carvers to whom this talent was granted during a dream. The latter constituted the means of ...


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Motherhood figure Agni
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African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Agni statue

Carved and decorated according to aesthetic criteria allowing to "capture" the spirit to which the medium or healer is addressing, this maternity has an elaborate braided hairstyle and beaded ornaments. beads. Each of the children on her lap grasps a breast. These types of statues were valued for the effectiveness of the rites they performed.
Satin polychrome patina. The work of a sculptor from the Agni ethnic group, a sub-group of the rich and famous Akan people present in the Ivory Coast and southern Ghana, this African statue ensured communication with the spirits of the ancestors and genies established in the supernatural world and belonged to the Comian female members of secret societies, endowed with occult gifts. The Portuguese came into contact with the ...


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Maternity figure Pfemba Kongo
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African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Kongo Maternity

Tribal sculpture of the Kongo, female effigy seated cross-legged, supporting a child. She embodies the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure, as evidenced by the rhombic scarifications on the bust. The Yombe indeed adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, with this type of pattern of rhombus motifs in relation to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The open mouth shows traditionally filed teeth. This type of figure also adorned the top of prestige canes, mwala . Black satin patina. Belonging to the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the West African coast, in the southwestern Republic of the Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternities. Among the Kongo , the nganga took charge of rituals by activating a spiritual force with a nkondi ...

Yoruba polychrome maternity figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Yoruba

This sculpture of African tribal art was destined to be enthroned on an altar. Facilitating communication with the sacred, it reminds the divinity of its duties towards men. The child she holds on her lap symbolizes protection and fertility. Wearing a high crest, she sports the keloids of the Yoruba nobles. The bulging eyes, fleshy lips, are also distinctive markers of Yoruba tribal statuary. Misses on the base. Scabby patina locally flaked. Desiccation cracks. The Yoruba practiced the slave trade with the Europeans and in particular the Portuguese before being completely subjugated to the British following a long period of infighting between the various kings or oba in power. The main Yoruba cults are the Gélédé , Epa , Ogboni , and the Esu cult, through which a very wide ...


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280.00

Koulango maternity figure
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Statue Kulango

A female figure with delicate features, associated with fertility, she has a ringed neck and a bun hairstyle, a sign of her high rank. Seated on a royal Ashanti stool, she is nursing her child. Multiple strings of white beads encircle her hips. Glossy black patina.
br>Named Pakhalla by the Dioula, the Koulango formed the Loron in Voltaic territory. The Dagomba chiefs of the Bouna kingdom would later have referred to them as "Koulam" (singular: koulango , subject, vassal). Their complex history has given rise to a no less complex culture. It is between Burkina Faso and Comoé, in the north east of Côte d'Ivoire, that their territory extends. With an animist fetish religion, they address their ancestors and the spirits of nature through sculptures in which the souls of ...


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380.00

Female figure Kongo Nkisi
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kongo statue

Among the Kongo, the nganga took care of the rituals by activating a spiritual force with a nkondi (pl. nkissi). The term nkisi was then used to designate the notions of "sacred" or "divine". The most influential category of "minkisi kongo" consisted of instruments designed to help regional chiefs enforce the law. A metal object was nailed to a wooden figure as soon as a decision was made, each nail evoking a particular case: parties in dispute, divorce, conflicts between communities, etc. The nkondi wanted to ensure that the agreement to resolve the conflict was enforced and that individuals feared the consequences of their behavior. Its appearance thus personified the force residing there. From the second half of the twentieth century, minkisi minkondi were strategically placed along ...


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Ashanti Maternity
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Ashanti Maternity

Belgian private collection of African art Jan Putteneers.

Seated female representations from Côte d'Ivoire and Ghana are usually queens. A particularity of this piece is that this woman is carrying her child in her arms.
This one is removable like the stool. The latter with a curved seat is typical of the akan.
seats. The patina is clear and slightly worn in places.
The features of the face are marked with black color giving a realistic look, breathing life into the large black pupils.

The Akan people are subdivided into several famous subgroups spread near the coast in Ivory Coast and Ghana, having become rich through the trade of precious metals and slaves during contacts with Westerners and in particular the Portuguese who were the ...


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680.00

Maternity Baule Blolo bia
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Statue Baoule

Belgian tribal art collection.
The "inverted doubles" in the African art sculptures of Les Baule
A glossy brown-black patina magnifies this sculpture of Ivory Coast showing a seated woman nursing her child. Cracks of desiccation located on the base.
About sixty ethnic groups populate the Ivory Coast, including the Baoulé, in the center, Akans from Ghana, people of the savannah, practicing hunting and agriculture as well as the Gouro from whom they borrowed ritual cults and carved masks. Two types of statues are produced by the Baule, in the ritual context: The Waka-Sona statues, "being of wood" in Baule, evoke a besieged oussou, being of the earth. They are part of a type of statues intended to be used as a medium tool by the komien soothsayers, the latter being ...


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370.00

Maternity figure Pfemba Kongo
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Congo figure

Ex-collection Italian African tribal art.

Tribal sculpture Kongo depicting a woman sitting cross-legged, supporting a child. She embodies the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure. The Yombe adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, with diamond patterns related to proverbs glorifying work and social unity, such as those that dot her bust. The mouth shows traditionally filed teeth and the gaze indicates the ancestor's ability to perceive the beyond, to discern hidden things. This type of statuette also adorned the top of the canes of prestige, mwala. Golden brown satin patina. Cracks and abrasions. Belonging to the group Kongo , the Yombe are established on the West African coast, in the southwest of the Republic of Congo and Angola. Their statuary includes ...


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390.00

Maternity Igbo
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Igbo Statue

br>The facial scarifications ichi indicate that this igbo sculpture depicts a titled woman wearing a horned crest. She is pictured standing with her arms and legs spread out in a determined attitude, a child on her back. Locally flaked semi-saturated grey patina. Erosions and cracks.
Seeional body marks, tattoos and scarifications indicated the grade achieved in the initiation society. This effigy, embodying a tutelary deity, intermediate between men and the god named Chukwu was destined to be placed in the obu (Sing.: obi), houses of the men of the Cross River. The culture Igbo originates from the mythology of the Kingdom Nri of Nigeria, according to which the gods brought to believers palm oil, cassava, and yam-based remedies. These effigies often show symbolic objects, ...


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740.00

Senoufo Maternity Figure
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Senoufo

Senoufo African art and maternity wards
The Senoufo have produced a wide variety of African tribal art objects related to the Poro's initiation society: mask-heaumes, face masks, crests, peststatues, or statues depicting the mythical Mother Ka Tyéko.This female tribal statue features a symbolic gesture, sitting, a child with a breast. Scarifications in "moustaches of cat" are present at the cracks of the mouth, linear and parallel on the body. Her hairstyle evokes the mythical bird linked to cosmogony, evoked during the initiation of young people. Sculpture with a satin black patina.
Senoufo villages are made up of clusters of dwellings called katiolo . Each has its own association Poro whose members move up the initiation ladder throughout their lives. Members gather in a ...


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Maternity figure Kongo Pfemba
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue of Congo

African ritual objects have various appearances, such as this tribal sculpture of the Kongo , where a female effigy is about to breastfeed her child. She embodies the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure, as evidenced by the angular scarifications of the bust. The Yombe adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, of this type of pattern of orange motifs in relation to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The open mouth exhibits traditionally lined teeth, while the glazed gaze emphasizes the ancestor's ability to perceive the afterlife, to discern hidden things. This type of statuette also adorned the top of the prestige canes, mwala . Satin patina with warm reflections. Cracks.
Appding the Kongo group, the Yombe established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west ...





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