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African art - Pipe:

The use of the pipe is ancestral and Africa has been called the "land of pipes" because of the great number and variety. Cameroon is the country that has provided a very large quantity of pipes, whether they are made of wood for the ordinary citizen or bronze if it is devolved to the chief. The pipe has a social and human role in Cameroonian society, it is said that "it soothes hearts", "it gives happiness", it directs thoughts" etc...


Kongo Pipe
African art > African pipes in wood, in bronze > Kongo Pipe

Kongo figurative pipe whose bowl is carved with a face with realistic features. Wicker covers the handle. Semi-matte black patina.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembe, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by King Ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads of the borders between the current DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the Portuguese came into contact with the Kongo and converted their king to Christianity. This king, also called ntotela, controlled the appointment of court and provincial officials.


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180.00

Pende Pipe
African art > African pipes in wood, in bronze > Pende Pipe

Kneeling on the bowl of the pipe, the female figure has her hands joined on her abdomen. The tip springs from the top of the cap. Glossy black patina. Height on base: 22 cm.
The Western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the Eastern settled on the banks of the Kasaï downstream from Tshikapa. The influences of neighboring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity, the Mbuya masks, realistic, produced every ten years, take on a festive function, and embody different characters, including the chief, the diviner and his wife, the prostitute, the possessed, etc... The masks of initiation and those of power, the minganji, represent the ancestors and occur successively during the same ...


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240.00

Chokwe pipe
African art > African pipes in wood, in bronze > Chokwe pipe

Aiming in most cases to satisfy the thirst for prestige of their owners, utilitarian objects had to be adapted to the social rank of each. This small ritual pipe has a mouthpiece carved with a head referring to the ancestors of the clan. Tobacco use was widespread among the Chokwe, and smoking was an integral part of offerings to ajimu spirits
Beautiful patina lustrous by use, cracks. Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwé were then subjected to the Lunda empire from which they inherited a new hierarchical system and the sacredness of power. br>


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240.00

Pipe Chokwe
African art > African pipes in wood, in bronze > Pipe Chokwe


Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwé were then subjected to the Lunda empire from which they inherited a new hierarchical system and the sanctity of power. Nevertheless, the Chokwes never fully embraced these new social and political contributions. Three centuries later, they eventually seized the capital of Lunda weakened by internal conflicts, thus contributing to the dismantling of the kingdom. The Chokwe did not have centralized power but great chiefdoms. They were the ones who attracted artists who wanted to put their know-how at the exclusive service of the court. The artists created so many varied and quality pieces that the Lunda court employed only them. Aimed in most cases at satisfying the thirst for prestige of their holders, however, ...


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100.00

Ceremonial Pipe Hemba
African art > African pipes in wood, in bronze > Hemba Pipe

Sculpted anthropomorphic pipe depicting a male ancestor. Here the abdomen named difu, or 'lineage segment', forms the opening of the object. The majestic head bears carefully chiseled features. The headdress, behind the traditional headband, is gathered in multiple buns. Above, the piece flares into annelures.
Satina. Desication cracks.
The Hemba settled in southeastern Zaire. Once under the rule of the Luba, these farmers and hunters worship ancestors with effigies long attributed to the Luba.The statues singiti were preserved by the fumu mwalo and honored during ceremonies during which ...


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180.00





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