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African art - African statues : tribal fetish, maternity:

Often the work of blacksmiths who work on soft woods, African statuary includes statues of ancestors, dolls, statuettes of twins. All these statues offer geometric forms with angular contours, elongated features, sometimes with a severe expression. The arms can be glued to the body, or on the contrary, they can move away from it. We find seated or standing figures, arms and knees bent or as with the Dogon Tellem, arms raised towards the sky imploring for the coming of rain. The statues can also be used as fetishes for all sorts of animist practices, mainly in the Congo. Some are made of bronze as in the Benin kingdom. For the traditional African, their function is to make invisible realities visible.


Statue Holo
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Holo

Located in the Democratic Congo between the Yaka and the Tchokwé of Angola, the small Holo ethnic group migrated from the Angolan coast to settle near the banks of the Kwango River. Hunting and agriculture provide for their livelihood. Neighbouring ethnic groups, such as the Suku and Yaka, influenced their traditional sculptures. The Holos have produced hexagonal masks and prestige objects for the ruling elite. The Holos used sculptures, asexual anthropomorphic figures and bird effigies to guard against the influence of evil spirits, including the moon and the rainbow. These statues were placed near the houses as protection from lightning. In "Chokwe and their Bantu Neighbours" (p.110), the author states that these figures hamba named kaponya wa pwo nyi cikungulu symbolize fertility and ...


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Statue of Congo
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue of Congo

A subgroup of the Kongo , the Yombe, based on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola, are characterized by a statuary in which various figures of motherhood abound: round headdresses or pointed, mouth open on slender teeth, sometimes glazed gaze in which the pupils are clearly visible, characters kneeling, standing, sitting. Relief scarifications adorn the bust of the effigies, such as the bust of this Phemba statue. These cuts, made using needles, knives and razors, were then sprayed with coal or ash to accelerate healing. The mother sits in a suit on a circular base, an infant on her lap. The distinctive elements of the Kongo are the cheffal cap "mpu", the wearing of bracelets and a band compressing the chest. This mediating object was used ...


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85.00

Baule statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Baule statue

The "inverted doubles" in the African art sculptures of Baule
Many details crafted with meticulous care magnify this sculpture of a woman frozen in a traditional posture, the brilliance of the pearls cutting through the dark skin, the hands symbolically placed around the umbilical region. Black satin patina. Very minimal cracks and abrasions.
About sixty ethnic groups populate Côte d'Ivoire, including the Baoulé, in the center, Akans from Ghana, people of the savannah, practicing hunting and agriculture just like the Gouro from whom they borrowed ritual cults and masks carved. Two types of statues are produced by the Baoulé , Baulé , within the ritual framework: The Waka-Sona statues, "being of wood" in baoulé, evoke a assié oussou, being of the earth. They are one of a ...


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380.00

Nkishi statue
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Nkishi statue

The Nkishi figures of the Songye are renowned for their singular plasticity, such as this human sculpture with a face displaying a toothless grin. The excess is also inscribed in the lower part of the face, the long fingers provocatively holding the bulb of the abdomen, huge feet overhanging the cylindrical base. Satin black patina. Desication crack.
The Songye fetish, magic sculpture Nkisi, nkishi (pl. mankishi), plays among the Songye the role of mediator between gods and men. The large specimens are the collective property of an entire village, the smaller figures belonging to an individual or a family. In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle in Kasai, Katanga and South Kivu. Their society is organized in a patriarchal way. Their history is ...


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680.00

Lulua figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lulua figure

De verschillende soorten Afrikaanse beelden Luluwa, Lulua of Béna Lulua, met meerdere scarificaties, verheerlijken lokale leiders, moederschap, vruchtbaarheid en de vrouwelijke figuur. Dit Afrikaanse moederschap wordt in verband gebracht met de Buanga bua cibola-cultus en zou volgens de Lulua kinderen en zwangere vrouwen beschermen. Het personage benadrukt een prominente buik, het centrum van het lichaam en "object van alle zorg" (De kracht van het heilige, M.Faïk-Nzuji) Grijsbruin patina.
Het is in het zuiden van de Democratische Republiek Congo dat de Lulua, of Béna Lulua, uit West-Afrika zich vestigden. . Hun sociale structuur, gebaseerd op kaste, is vergelijkbaar met die van de Luba. Ze produceerden weinig maskers, maar meestal beeldjes van voorouders die de ideale ...


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180.00

Lega Figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lega Figure

Tribal statuette Sakimatwematwe (Multi-headed) belonging to an initiate of the Bwami, among the many others used throughout the initiations, linked to a Lega proverb. Equipped with two or more heads, this statuette would always illustrate the need for a global vision of events, and therefore the prudence, wisdom and impartiality that should result from it. (Biebuyck 1973).
Abraded velvety patina, grainy residues of kaolin. Losses and desication cracks.
During the initiation rites of the Bwami, among the Lega, the teacher guided the aspirant to a place where masks and statuettes were displayed, and it was through careful observation that the future initiate had to guess the more or less complex meaning. of these metaphors, the latter largely referring to proverbs and sayings. ...


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120.00

Lega figurines
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lega figurines

Identifiable by its context of use, this bust, with two faces topped with a feathered top evoking one of the headdresses of the Bwami aspirants, belonged to an insider of the Bwami and was part of a set used over the years Initiations. It was only visible at that time. The teacher guided the aspirant to a place where masks and statuettes were exhibited, and it was through careful observation that the future initiate had to guess the more or less complex meaning of these objects, real metaphors referring to largely to proverbs and sayings. Those who were not allowed to see the object, in order to be protected, had to submit to expensive ceremonies, and sometimes even join the lower rank of the Bwami, the kongabulumbu , at great expense to the families. Each of these initiations took ...


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Ibedji figures
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ibedji figures

The Ibeji, substitute images in African art.
Traditionally carved from iroko, whose roots and leaves are also used for ritual purposes, these "ere" (statues) figures of twins are in the form of couple figures. The pieces are bound together with cowrie shells, constituting, along with metal and beads, the "abiku", protective ornaments. In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, it is the remaining twin who takes over.
Sometimes a man would also have ibeji carved for his wife to induce pregnancy. As a carrier of the twin's ...


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450.00

Yoruba Twins
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba Twins

Here, the "abiku", which is protectively dented, is available in coloured necklaces and a chain made up of cauris that unites the doll statuettes "ere" (statues), evoking twins. Their hairstyle is made up of braids gathered in a conical bun. Hands are placed on the hips. Smooth, sainy surface, residual dark inlays.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man sometimes had ibeji for his wife to sculpt in order to arouse pregnancy. Supporting the soul of the twin, the ibeji influences the life of the ...


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450.00

Hemba figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Hemba figure

Commemorating a local chief, in charge of interceding towards men with the gods, this Hemba tribal art figure stands out for its haughty bearing. Sculpted details have been rendered with meticulous care. Soft satin patina, kaolin residue.

Generally made in iroko, these ritual sculptures were venerated by a particular clan and stored in rooms for funerary use in the chief's house.
Matte grey-brown patina. Desication cracks, and numerous erosions.
The Hemba, established in the south-east of Zaire, on the right bank of the Lualaba, were for a long time subjected to the neighboring Luba empire, which had on their culture, their religion and their art a certain influence. Ancestor worship, whose effigies have long been attributed to the Luba, is central to Hemba society. ...


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150.00

Hemba statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Hemba statue

This tribal art hemba sculpture commemorating a local chief, an intermediary between men and gods, stands out for its proportionately imposing head and haughty bearing. . Grainy matte patina, erosions and cracks.

Usually made in iroko, these ritual sculptures were venerated by a particular clan and stored in rooms for funeral use in the chief's house.
The Hemba, established in the south-east of Zaire, on the right bank of the Lualaba, have long been subjected to the neighboring Luba empire which has had on their culture, their religion and their art a certain influence. The cult of ancestors, whose effigies have long been attributed to the Luba, is central in hemba society. Genealogy is in fact the guarantor of privileges and the distribution of land. All ...


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150.00

Yoruba statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba statue

African sculpture associated with "Esu, Eshu", or "Ogo Elegba", divine messenger of the Yoruba pantheon, intermediary between humans and the God Olodumare, supposed to grant benefits and punishments, and guaranteeing the balance of creation through the offerings, sacrifices and libations administered to it. He is Legba in Fon voodoo.
The characteristic hairstyle (figure at the top) symbolizes fertility and energy. These carved figures reflect the iconography of tribal art Yoruba.
Discreetly polychrome patina. Cracks. The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name of Nago. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose following the disappearance of the Ifé civilization and are still the basis of the ...


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Lengola figure
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lengola figure

The stylized African art of the forest tribes.
Female figure with a flat face crossed by a long nose, probably associated with statuettes named akunga that were used by members of the female ekongo society. Dark lustrous patina.
The Lengola , are established near the Metoko in the center of the Congolese basin between the Lomami and Lualaba rivers, a primary forest people dedicated to the worship of a single God, a rare monotheism in Africa. Their society,the Bukota, welcoming both men and women, is the equivalent of the Bwami association of the Lega. Their sculptures, subject to the influence of the neighboring Mbole, Lega and Binja, played a role during initiation,funeral or circumcision ceremonies, and were then placed on the tomb of high rank initiates. Each of ...


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Kongo figurine
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kongo figurine

Kongo Yombe statuette with glazed eyes, symbolizing the connection to the spiritual world. The bust, under the shell breasts, is engraved with the scarified motifs used among the Kongo. The shiny, oiled patina bears filmy red-colored residue on and around the face. Cracks. The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombé were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rites through of carved nkondo nkisi fetishes. The Yombe settled on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their sculpture is mainly naturalistic, made up of insignia and court emblems, anecdotal objects linked to the Lemba cult, maternity wards, funerary masks and fetishes. The nganga, both healers, were in charge of religious ...


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Songye fetish
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Songye fetish

Magical sculpture nkishi (pl. mankishi ) whose face takes the features of kifwebe masks. Cut into angular volumes, it is also loaded with the bishimba lodged in the horn or in the bead surrounding the bust, the abdomen apparently not concealing any. For the Songye, the addition of various accessories, metal, trinkets, etc... reinforced the "power" of the fetish. Velvety matte patina. erosions. br />
These protective fetishes for homes are among the most popular in Africa. The Nkisi plays the role of mediator between gods and men. The large specimens are the collective property of an entire village, while the smaller figures belong to an individual or a family. In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle on the left bank of the Lualaba. Their society is ...


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240.00

Boulou statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Boulou statue

Ex-collection French African tribal art.
Animal sculptures in African art .
Embodying the spirit of the nkug forest, this protective statue depicts a naturalistic gorilla and her cub. Rounded volumes have been favored, the main subject rolling up maternally against the small one. Clay heaps mixed with baby bird down, residues of libation practices, remain on the surface. Colored highlights, desiccation cracks.
Located between Cameroon and Gabon, in the equatorial forest, the Boulou are part of the Fang-Beti group. Like the Fang of southern Cameroon famous for their large white masks, and in contact with the Bakwele of the extreme south-east of Cameroon, the Boulou also practiced the Ngi rite to fight against witchcraft and poisoning. Ngi is the gorilla, a formidable animal ...


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380.00

Statue Zande
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Zande

Belgian African art collection.
Sculpture integrating the wide variety of objects of the Yanda cult whose inventive composition is declined in characters placed back to back forming a hybrid being of supernatural aspect. Brown oily patina, grainy residue.
Formerly referred to as "Niam-Niam" because they were considered cannibals, the tribes grouped together under the name of Zande, Azandé, settled, coming from Chad, on the border of the D.R.C. (Zaire), Sudan and the Central African Republic. According to their beliefs, man is endowed with two souls, one of which is transformed upon his death into an animal-totem of the clan to which he belongs. Their sculptures have been linked to their secret society since the beginning of the 20th century, the Mani, exalting the ...


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Lobi statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lobi statue

Female figure represented naked, and whose specificities seem to indicate that she was associated with fertility. This type of sculpture was placed on the altar after a ritual to become the receptacle of a bush spirit, the Thil, and thus become an active, intermediary being who fights against sorcerers and all other harmful forces. br> Minimal cracks. Grainy matte patina.
When honored, these spirits would manifest their benevolence in the form of abundant rains, good health, many births. These spirits are supposed, among the Lobi, to transmit to the soothsayers the laws to follow in order to benefit from their protection.
They are represented by wooden or copper sculptures called Bateba (large or small, figurative or abstract, they adopt different attitudes that symbolize ...


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490.00

Kongo statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kongo statue

br>Wearing a high headgear, dressed in military uniform, and wearing thick boots, this "settler" character is depicted in a nonchalant and assured posture, hands in his pockets. The subtle expression of the face, treated with efficiency, contributes to underline this effect. Sandy matte patina, locally darkened. Slight cracks.
In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads of the borders between the current DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the Portuguese came into contact with the Kongo and converted their king to Christianity. Although monarchical, the Kongo political system had a democratic aspect because the king was actually placed at the head of the kingdom following an election held by a council of ...


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280.00

Luba figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Luba figure

Luba African statuette figured in a frontal posture, hands resting on the shoulders. Her headdress, behind a wide band revealing a shaved forehead, is related to that worn by Luba women at the beginning of the 20th century. By her symbolic gesture she indicates that the secrets of royalty (the bizila) belong to women thanks to their role as political and spiritual intermediaries. Scarifications in relief on the abdomen, horizontal on the lower abdomen, dot his bust. Black satin patina, erosions.
The Luba (Baluba in Chiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, thus the name (Baluba, which means “the Lubas”). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of Ilunga Kalala who killed ...


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140.00

Togbo statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Togbo statue

Sculpture offering, between ample circular ears, a concave face divided by an imposing nose. The eyes are engraved in button, a wide mouth is incised with teeth. The stretched bust bears parallel "v" markings of Ngombe origin. Smooth mahogany patina, erosions.
Descended from the Banda group, the Togbo originally immigrated from the Lake Chad region to the Ubangi territories. They rubbed shoulders with the Ngbaka and the Ngombe , shared the habits and customs of different Banda clans, but were above all marked by the influence populations of the Central African Republic (CAR). Besides the ancestors, they fear the spirits of nature and practice divination in an attempt to improve their destiny. Among their various ritual sculptures, the zukoro statuettes intervened during ...


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280.00





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