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African art - African statues : tribal fetish, maternity:

Often the work of blacksmiths who work on soft woods, African statuary includes statues of ancestors, dolls, statuettes of twins. All these statues offer geometric forms with angular contours, elongated features, sometimes with a severe expression. The arms can be glued to the body, or on the contrary, they can move away from it. We find seated or standing figures, arms and knees bent or as with the Dogon Tellem, arms raised towards the sky imploring for the coming of rain. The statues can also be used as fetishes for all sorts of animist practices, mainly in the Congo. Some are made of bronze as in the Benin kingdom. For the traditional African, their function is to make invisible realities visible.


Fertility figure Sukuma / Nyamwezi
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Sukuma

A gourd draped in animal skin and fur, trimmed with cords, serves as an abdomen for the çi-contre statuette, originating from the inner region of Tanzania.This rare sculpture-fetish embodying an ancestor extols fertility by this bulging body, and the hands of the character placed around the umbilical. Oiled red brown patina.
In the southern region of Tanzania's coastline, around Dar-es-Salam, a relatively homogeneous group produced most of the artistic productions. It includes Swahili, Kaguru, Doé, Kwéré, Luguru, Zaramo, Kami. The second region is a territory covering southern Tanzania as far as Mozambique, home to some Makonde and Yao, Ngindo, Mwéra, and Makua. In northeastern Tanzania, the Chaga, Paré, Chamba, Zigua, Maasai, Iraqw, Gogo, and Hehe have an artistic production with ...


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190.00

Male effigy Nyamézi, Nyamwezi
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Nyamézi

Ex- african art collection form Luxemburg.
This human figure of long morphology offers a proportionally reduced head, in which hollowed-out eyes were generally encrusted with white beads. The size of the ears contrasts with a discreet appearance where the jaw forms a slight bulge. This type of statues, among the wide variety of tribal production of this region, participated in the worship of ancestors, and some played a role in traditional Seeker activities. Smooth and sainy patina revealing the veining of the wood, range of hot browns. Lacks, cracks.
The nyamwézi are made up of tribes of various origins that make up the most guarded group in central Tanzania, yet share the same cultural traits. They were involved in the 19th century in the caravan trade that crossed their ...

Ashanti Akua ba doll
African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Fertility wishes in African art Ashanti.
This stylized female figure, called Akua'ba (plural Akua'mma), has features peculiar to Ashanti dolls, generally devoid of legs: flat, circular head surmounting a cylindrical bust framed by horizontal arms. Fine colored bead necklaces contrast with the satin black patina. Erosions.
These stylized wooden effigies were worn by pregnant women, clasped in their loincloths, to ensure the arrival of healthy children. The overwhelming majority of these statues have female attributes.

The Ashanti are one of the ethnic groups of Ghana (formerly the "Gold Coast"), part of the Akan group, inhabiting a region covered by forests. Like other populations living in the central and southern part of Ghana, they speak a language of ...


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240.00

Kouyou ancestor statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kouyou statue

African figure associated with the mythical ancestor Oso of the Kouyou, a neighboring group of the Punu in the Republic of Congo. The face and body bear numerous scarified designs, and the mouth reveals sharp teeth.
Polychrome matte patina. Erosions and cracks from desiccation. In the past, the Kouyou were divided into two totemic clans: in the west that of the panther, and in the east that of the snake. A secret male association, Ottoté, played an important political role in the appointment of chiefs. The initiation of young men ended with the revelation of the serpent god Ebongo represented in the form of a head. The Kibe-kibe or Kebekebe dances, which accompanied the ceremony, reactivated the successive stages of creation. The panther clan had a drum as its emblem. For ...


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Yoruba altar figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Yoruba

The female figure depicted sitting on a throne whose feet are parallel to the legs of the character, forms an incarnation of one of the many orisa of the Yoruba, equivalent to the Christian Saints. The miniature figures that surround him would be minor followers or deities. Crusty patina, mate. Lack on one of the braids of the hairstyle.
The Yoruba society is very organized and has several associations whose roles vary. While the egbe society is strengthening social norms, the aro unites farmers. The gelede has more esoteric and religious aims. The notables come together in a society called susu. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the disappearance of the civilization Ifé and are still the basis of the political structure of the Yoruba. The Oyos created two cults ...


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210.00

Figure masculine Bembe
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Bembe

Ex-collection of Belgian African art.
This figure with angular contours offers a vertical profile. It would be associated with funerary rites. Cracks and erosions, red ochre highlights.
The Bembe ethnic group is a branch of the Luba that left the Congo in the 18th century to settle near Tanzania and Burundi. Their society and artistic tendencies are marked by the influence of neighboring ethnic groups in the Lake Tanganyika region: the Lega, the Buyu, etc.. Indeed, like the Lega, the Bembe had a Bwami association responsible for initiation and structuring the society but while the Bwami was exclusive to the Lega, other associations coexisted among the Bembe, such as the Elanda and Alunga societies. Within the Bwami, art objects such as masks and statues had the role of ...


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Makonde Ndimu Belly Mask
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Makonde mask

The Makonde , a matrilineal Bantu population of northern Mozambique and southern Tanzania, wore mask-casks called lipiko , mapiko , during initiation ceremonies for young men. The Makonde worship an ancestor , which explains the abundance of relatively naturalistic female statuary. In addition to facial masks, midimu , the Makonde also produce body masks featuring the female bust, exalting fertility, which were worn by men.
A fine example coated with a satin red patina, locally encrusted with light dark granular particles.
Makonde carvings refer to an ancestor in connection with creation, the first Makonde man having carved a female image who became the mother of his children, revered ever since.


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Kasongo / Kusu Kakudji Fetish
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kasongo Fetish

The personal protection figures kakudjis , used by the Hemba, Kusu and Kasongo, were inspired by Songye fetishes. The magical charge, composed of ingredients of various origins, was inserted into the head cavity. This example retains clay residue in this orifice. The piece is massive, carved in a very dense wood, the arms of the character are extended by a ring that drapes his abdomen, surmounting a cylindrical base. Satin patina. The Kusu established on the left bank of the Lualaba have borrowed the artistic traditions of the Luba and the Hemba and possess a caste system similar to that of the Luba . The Kasongos form a Kusu subgroup, now scattered among the Luba, Songye, and Hemba. The statues singiti were kept by the fumu mwalo and honored in ceremonies during which ...


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390.00

Buyu Bembe ancestor statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bassikassingo statue

The influence of migratory movements in African art
Migration flows have intermingled within the same territories of the Bembe , Lega, Buyu (Buye) or Boyo , Binji and Bangubangu. The Bassikassingo , considered by some to be a sub-clan Buyu , are not of bembe origin although they live on their territory, the work of Biebuyck has allowed to trace their history. Organized in line-ups, they borrowed the association of the Bwami Lega. The bembé and boyo traditions are relatively similar They venerate the spirits of nature, water specifically among the Boyo, but also heroic ancestors, whose will is sought to be known through divinatory rites. Hunting is also an opportunity to make sacrifices of gratitude to the entities whose favour sities have been called for and protected. Their masks ...


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Dogon enthronement figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Dogon statue

French African art collection.
In African tribal art, this type of sculpture frequently illustrates the transmission of power. Among the Dogon, however, its significance remains unknown, but could evoke an anecdote related to creation myths.
Black greasy patina. Carved for the most part on commission by a family, the Dogon statues may also be the object of worship by the entire community. Their functions, however, remain little known. Alongside Islam, Dogon religious rites are organized around four main cults: the Lebe, relating to fertility, under the spiritual authority of the Hogon; the Wagem, ancestor worship under the authority of the patriarch; the Binou invoking the spirit world and led by the Binou priest; and the mask society concerning funerals.


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Lobi sculpture in bronze
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Lobi bronze

Couple figured back to back, symbolizing complementarity. Khaki brown patina, golden highlights. Populations from the same cultural region, grouped under the name "lobi," make up one-fifth of the inhabitants of Burkina Faso. Not very numerous in Ghana, they also settled in the north of Côte d'Ivoire. It was at the end of the eighteenth century that the Lobi , coming from northern Ghana, settled among the indigenous Thuna and Puguli, the Dagara, Dian, Gan, and Birifor.


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Lobi Buthib talisman figure
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Lobi talisman

Carved figurine for individual use, for, according to Lobi beliefs, a protective or therapeutic action. These statuettes were placed on the altar after a ritual to be the receptacle of a bush spirit, the Thil, and thus become an active being, an intermediary fighting against sorcerers and all other harmful forces. When honored, these spirits would manifest their benevolence in the form of abundant rains, good health, and numerous births; ignored, they would withdraw it and bring devastating epidemics, drought, and suffering.
They are supposed to transmit to the diviners the laws that the followers must follow in order to enjoy their protection.
They are represented by wooden or copper sculptures called Bateba (large or small, figurative or abstract, they adopt different ...


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180.00

Statue Dan L-Me - Ivory Coast
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Dan

Double shells cap this female figure of Dan as a wife. The face is reminiscent of the Dans' masks. A concentrated attitude, her arms curiously folded, she is camped legs apart. Tribal scarifications are finely rendered by patterns in braces. Very beautiful satin patina dotted with kaolin residue. Lack on the end of the foot.
See gifts of women, food, festive ceremonies and honorable status once rewarded the dan sculptors to whom this talent was granted during a dream. The latter was the means of communication of Du, invisible spiritual power, with men. Statuary, rare, played a prestigious role with its holder. These are mainly effigies of wives, la m , wooden human beings. These are not incarnations of spirits or effigies of ancestors, but prestigious figures representing living ...


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210.00

Lega Iginga figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lega figure

The tribal art of the Lega, Balega, or even Warega, is distinguished by its initiation statuettes, also made in ivory, some of which were kept in a basket for the highest ranking Bwami of different communities.
This type of tribal art statuette Iginga ( Maginga in the plural), was the property of the high ranking members of the Bwami , a secret society admitting men and their wives , and governing social life . This organization was subdivided into initiatory stages, the highest being the Kindi.
The statuettes were used in the course of the initiation of the aspirants. Each one is a representation with a particular form and meaning from which a moral or dogma always derives. The particularity of the Lega, contrary to other ethnic groups, is to judge the quality of ...


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190.00

Lulua figurative pipe
African art > African pipes in wood, in bronze > Lulua pipe

Ex-collection African art. This figure with hands on the temples is depicted squatting on the stove on which the figure's oversized sex rests. The conical top hairstyle, extended from the pipe, probably evokes the tip of the hair named disungu. The face bears the traditional facial scarifications, once common practice.
Desiccation cracks. It is in the south of the Democratic Republic of Congo that the Lulua , or Béna Lulua ,from West Africa settled.
Lulua is a generic term, referring to a large number of heterogeneous peoples who inhabit the area near the Lulua River, between the Kasai and Sankuru Rivers. Their social structure, based on castes, is similar to that of the Luba. During the late 19th century, the Lulua culture underwent radical changes. In 1875, the ...


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380.00

Beembé Fly-Hunting Channel
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Beembé figure

Ex-collection of Belgian African art.

Small, meticulously sculpted figure, with large digitized hands placed in front of the bust, and under which a pastille indicates the umbilicus. The legs are fleshy, tight, and half bent. The face with stylized features appears meditative. Satin patina with granular residual incrustations. Established on the plateaus of the People's Republic of Congo (formerly Brazzaville), and not to be confused with the Bembé group north of Lake Tanganinyika, the small group Babembé, Béembé, was influenced by the Teke rites and culture, but especially by that of the Kongo. Settled in the current Republic of Congo, the Béembé originally formed the kingdom of the Kongo, with the Vili, Yombé, Bwendé and Woyo. They were under the tutelage of the king ntotela ...


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150.00

Couple of statuettes Ere ibedji Yoruba
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ibedji statues

Featuring numerous protective adornments and accessories, these doll statuettes are (statues), the incarnation of twins, feature a conical hairstyle made of braids, tinged with indigo. The strings of currants symbolize values of wealth and fertility.
SPatine lustrous mahogany.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash it and feed it regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man also sometimes had ibeji for his wife in the hope of pregnancy. Supporting the twin's soul, ibeji influences the life of the family, becoming a source of benefit to his parents, ...

Statuettes Ere Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ibeji dolls

Ibeji statuettes, embodiment of the missing child in Yoruba African art.
Wide almond-shaped eyes, deep scarification on the faces, braids combined into a crest and identical physiognomies that illustrate the aesthetic traditions in Yoruba African art. Solidly encamped on circular supports, these twins wear pearl and cowrie shell ornaments and large metal rings, these elements being associated with the sacred. Chocolate patina, matte inlays.
In the language of the people Yoruba , ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. These African statuettes named ibeji are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of them; she can wash and feed them regularly. If she dies, the ...


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Tadep Mambila statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Mambila statue

As if mastering a powerful internal energy, the shoulders and arms of this statue are concentrated around a small bust widening towards the abdomen. The legs end in thick feet, digitized towards the center. Huge oncave orbits underlined by tenons occupy most of the face. At the top, a crusty prominence, an aggregate of ritual elements. Thick matte patina cracked, highlights of kaolin and red ochre. Despite their small numbers, the thirty thousand Mambila (or Mambilla, Mambere, Nor, Torbi, Lagubi, Tagbo, Tongbo, Bang, Ble, Juli, Bea)(the "men", in Fulani), settled in the northwest of Cameroon, have created a large number of masks and statues easily identifiable by their heart-shaped faces. Although the Mambila believe in a creator god named Chang or Nama, they worship only their ...


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Mambila Tadep Statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Mambila Statue

Made according to recurring canons, these statues supposedly embodying the ancestors often have small studs on their heads as a headdress, like this slightly off-center sculpture. It depicts a corpulent figure, whose head is encased in broad rounded shoulders.
The hands meet under the face which seems to be extended by a beard, while the hallucinated look could suggest trance. The massive crenellated legs reproduce the angular volume of the abdomen.
Crusty ochre matte patina, locally scaled. Cracks.


Despite their small numbers, the thirty thousand Mambila (or Mambilla, Mambere, Nor, Torbi, Lagubi, Tagbo, Tongbo, Bang, Ble, Juli, Bea)(the "men," in Fulani), settled in northwestern Cameroon, created a large number of masks and statues easily identifiable by ...


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Lari / Teke fertility pattern
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lari statue

The traditional African art of the Lari bears the influence of the groups with which they cohabit: Beembe, Sundi, Bwende, and Teke. A population originating from the Kongo Kingdom, the Lari , Lali , Baladi , have settled in Teke territory. Matrilineal, they are organized into lineages headed by a chief mfumu kanda , and grouped in villages under the authority of the chief mfumu mpu. They live by agriculture and hunting, the latter requiring the use of specific rites in which sculptures come into play. Witch doctors and healers also employ statuettes, including "mamuanga", as well as sculptures relating to the initiation cult lemba .
An anthropomorphic figure with a bearded and striated face, this statue offers a typically Kongo keloid on the forehead. The arms are ...


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