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African art - African Statues:

Often the work of blacksmiths who work on soft woods, African statuary includes statues of ancestors, dolls, statuettes of twins. All these statues offer geometric shapes with angular contours, elongated features, sometimes a severe expression. The arms can be glued to the body, or on the other hand they can move away from it. There are characters sitting or standing, arms and knees bent or as the Dogons Tellem with arms raised to the sky pleading for the coming of rain.


Ancestor statue Baule Asia usu
African art > African Statues > Statue Baoulé

The Akan cults in African art
This "Waka -Sona", ", wood-to-baouu", set on stocky, muscular legs suitable for agricultural work, grabs his beard as oil anointings stiffened. The high summit ridge that composes his hairstyle meets in three shells ending in braids. Many traditional checkerboard scarifications roam his body. A hand with de-measured fingers rests in the umbilical region. This gesture of life evokes the parentage on which he exercises his protection. Light wood, irregular satin surface.
Two types of statues Waka- Sona are produced by the baoulé in the ritual framework: those that evoke a assiè oussou, being of the earth, and which are part of a set of statues intended to be used as a medium tool by the soothsayers komian, the latter being selected by the asye usu ...


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380.00

Fang reliquary figure
African art > African Statues > Statue Fang

This anthropomorphic sculpture of atypical proportions, emanating from the Ntumu regions between Gabon, Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea, displays a pout inscribed in a prognathic jaw, a broad forehead and a hairstyle pulled towards the neck. A pierced umbilical, like sex, springs from the abdomen. The oiled patina, black, makes a light wood appear locally. Altered feet. Abrasions and shards of wood.
At the Fang of Cameroon and Gabon, each family has a "Byeri", or reliquary box, in which the bones of illustrious ancestors are preserved. These boxes were guarded by the oldest man in the village, the "esa". The reliquary boxes were surmounted by a statue or a head that acted as guardian of the boxes "byi", named as the cult to which they resemble. These were kept in a dark corner of the ...


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480.00

Motherhood figure Chokwe / Lwena
African art > African Statues > Statue Chokwe

Statue associated with therapeutic cult type Hamba , this sculpture Chokwe or Lwena embodies a female ancestor supposed to guarantee fertility or healing. These figures were arranged around the altar muyombo, a tree at the foot of which sacrifices and offerings were once made. Sculptures such as figures made in sticks or poles ( Mbunji or mbanji), planted in the ground, were also associated. The related ethnic groups had the same type of altar, a witness before which rituals, oaths and important transactions were concluded. (Source: Chokwe, B. Wastiau)The character who also depicts the second wife of legendary chef Chibinda Ilunga sports a bulging hairstyle like a helmet and metal adornments. Smooth patina with matte granular pigments. Abrasions of the character's fingers. Xylophage ...


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450.00

Reliquary figure Kota
African art > African Reliquary > statue Kota

With large flat side shells, this singular concave face with an ovoid forehead is plated with gold copper leaves. A fine cling makes the whole thing adhere to the wooden soul. The ensemble is highlighted with carefully engraved geometric patterns, composing friezes embellishing the sculpture. The Kota of the Sebe Valley, located in Gabon but also in Congo, produced this type of sculpture that played the role of "medium" between the living and the dead and continued to watch over their descendants. They are sometimes bifaces, the mbulu-viti , symbolizing the masculine and feminine aspect at the same time. This type of coin was used in the preservation of mortuary remains of high-lineage ancestors in baskets topped with very specific sculptures, which played the role of guardians of relics ...


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230.00

Idoma Anjenu Statue
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African art > African Statues > Idoma Anjenu Statue

The Idoma live at the confluence of Benue and Niger, and there are 500,000 farmers and traders, with Igbo, Cross River and Igala influences in their art and customs, and it is often difficult. to distinguish them from their neighbors The royal lineage members of their oglinye society, glorifying courage, use masks and crests during funerals and festivities, and also produce fertility statues with whitened faces and incised teeth. Janiform crests are generally exhibited at the funerals of notables, and members of the Kwompten male society used statues called goemai as part of healing rituals. This male character in a frontal position embodies a spirit of water, anjenu, of the river Benoué. This cult, widespread among Idoma animists as well as Igala and Southern Yoruba, was supposed to ...


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Urhobo Shrine Figure
African art > African Statues > Statue Urhobo

The Urhobos, living near the northwest of the Niger Delta River, are the main ethnic group in Delta State among the 36 states of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. They speak Urhobo, a language of the Niger-Congo group. With the Isoko whose art is close, they are collectively known as Sobo. Their large sculptures depicting the spirits of nature, edjo, or the clan's founding ancestors, to whom sacrifices were offered, were grouped in sanctuaries within the villages. They also produce figures similar to the igbo ikenga called iphri, ivwri, half-animal, half-human. They personify male aggression and are intended for warriors and notables. However, after consultation with the soothsayer, young children can also wear miniature iphri strapped to their necks in the form of geometric amulets. This ...


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480.00

Kusu bust figure
African art > African Statues > Statue Kusu

The Kusu established on the left bank of the Lualaba have indeed borrowed the artistic traditions of the luba and Hemba and have a caste system similar to that of the Luba .  The Hemba settled in southeastern Zaire, on the right bank of the Lualaba River. Formerly under the rule of the Luba , these farmers and hunters practice the worship of ancestors by means of effigies long attributed to the Luba.In this region, between the Bembe, Boyo, Hemba, Songye and Tetela, ritual objects have been subjected to exchanges and stylistic influences. The narrowness of the bust is mainly noted on the figures of ancestors to free the space of the arms among the major characteristics. The statues singiti were kept by the fumu mwalo and honoured during ceremonies during which sacrifices were offered to ...


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280.00

Fertility doll Akua ba Fante
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African art > African Dolls > Fanti figurines

Fante art has become known mainly for its fertility dolls, which are worn by pregnant women, who do not have to lay eyes on a malformed being or object, lest their children resemble them. On the other hand, by looking at these dolls, expressions of idealized beauty, they are supposed to promote the beauty of their future children. These dolls carved in the Fante, population akan coastal regions of Ghana, ancient gold coast, have a slightly different appearance than those of the Ashanti. However, their function is more or less similar. The head here adopts a rectangular shape. We find the ringed neck and the tubular bust, here devoid of arms, established on a cicular base and reduced breasts. This statuette, the back of which features geometric engravings associated with the scarfications ...

Couple of twins Ibedji Yoruba
African art > African Statues > Ibedji Yoruba

Here, the "abiku", adornments with a protective purpose, can be found here in each of the characters carved into coloured pearl necklaces, cauris chains, and metal bells. These statuette-dolls "ere" (statues), evoking twins, feature a hairstyle formed of braids gathered in a sagittal crest.
Satric glossy surface.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man sometimes had ibeji for his wife to sculpt in order to arouse pregnancy. Supporting the soul of the twin, the ibeji influences the life of the ...


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300.00

Kuyu Totem Figure
African art > African Statues > Statue Kuyu

Wearing a totemic animal evoking the camelon, this sculpture depicts a mythical being with three faces, perched on a pachyderm. A crusty, locally cracked polychrome patina is the entire piece.
Two totem clans once formed the Kuyu ethnic group, living along the river of the same name, in the northwest of the People's Republic of Congo: in the west that of the panther, and in the east that of the snake. A secret male association, Ottoté , played an important political role in the appointment of leaders. The initiation of the young men ended with the revelation of the snake god Ebongo represented in the form of a head. The dances Kibe-kibe that accompanied the ceremony reactivated the successive stages of creation. The panther clan had a drum as its emblem. For its part, the snake's ...


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450.00

Baoulé maternity figure
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African art > African Statues > Statue Baoulé

A tribal sculpture depicting a woman sitting with a child, she displays traditional keloid scars and a hairstyle whose chiseled braids on the wood form a large shell. A bust and a long neck give elegant volumes to this statue expressing a peaceful concentration. Grey-brown speckled patina, kaolin-encrusted residue. Two types of statues are produced by the baoulé in the ritual framework: The statues Waka-Sona, " be of wood " in baoulé, evoke a asssouou, be of the earth. They are part of a type of statues intended to be used as a medium tool by the soothsayers komien, the latter being selected by the spirits asye usu in order to communicate the revelations of the afterlife. The second type of statues, made according to the soothsayer's instructions, are the spouses of the afterlife, male, ...


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Bamoun/Bamileke beaded statue
African art > African Statues > Statue Cameroon

Colors and chiefdoms in African art. The Bamiléké , a subgroup of a larger people also made up of Bamoun and Tikar , are famous for their sculptures of African art covered with pearls, signs of prosperity and wealth, conferring on the royal object the brilliance that distinguishes it from common objects.

This female statuette of ancestor, stocky, was first carved in wood and then covered with a canvas of rabane encrusted with imported multicolored pearls, predominantly blue and red. She wears a crest hairstyle ending in the neck. The hands are placed on her lower abdomen in a gesture associated with fertility. The physiognomy displays a distinctive expressiveness of African tribal art from the Grassland regions.
Among the Bamilékés as in other ethnic groups, the art ...


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150.00

Poupée Mossi Biga
African art > African Statues > Mossi doll

A schematic anthropomorphic sculpture, whose appearance of the head varies by region, it represents a spirit with which a relationship is established. As a fertility attribute, the stylized chest is highlighted on the tubular bust marked with linear scarifications. The stylized head evokes the braids worn in crests by the girls. Satin light brown patina. The use of dolls by young African women is not done exclusively within the initiation context. When menstruation occurs, the girl is considered a potential mother. In many ethnic groups, the search for fertility is then done through rituals. Wooden figures will then be carved, some reflecting both genres, in many cases covered with pearls and clothing. During the period of confinement, the doll, which becomes a child who asks to be fed, ...


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140.00

Zande figurines
African art > African Statues > Statue Zande

Ex-collection African art Switzerland.
Zande anthropomorphic figure where we find the triangular face with a copper ring on his right ear. Coffee bean eyes, enlarged arms on a bulging torso. Black brown skate.
Formerly referred to as " Niam-Niam " because they are considered anthropophages, the tribes grouped under the name Zande, Azandé, settled, from Chad, on the border of the R.D.C. (Zaire), Sudan and Central African Republic. According to their beliefs, man is endowed with two souls, one of which transforms upon his death into the totem animal of the clan to which he belongs. The African tribal art of the Zande, or ", those who own a lot of land", apart from their courtart consisting of spoons, receptre, pipes and harps, counts two types of statues: Kudu statues of a ...


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140.00

Female figure OviMbundu
African art > African Statues > Statue OviMbundu

Bracelets and tin hair, wide curls, rows of tiny pearls, form the adornments of this statuette of young woman OviMbundu, represented frontally in an attitude of tension, arms spread from the bust, straight head . A scarification, soaring, running from nose to forehead, completes the puncture patterns present on the cheeks. A feather was probably inserted in front of the headdress, in the opening practiced for this purpose.
This figure may have been associated with female initiation rituals, fertility, or divinatory, the hairstyle evoking that, fashioned with oil and red ochre, of young girls nyaneka as a result of the ritual efuko . Honey satin patina, desication cracks. It is on the Benguéla plateau in Angola that the Ovimbudu , Ovimbundu, composed of farmers and herders, have ...


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180.00

Chokwe Altar Figure
African art > African Statues > Statue Chokwe

This tribal sculpture glorifies the spiritual and physical power, qualities of the hunter, through the representation of the founding hero of the ethnic group, Chibinda Ilunga, leader and mythical hero Chibinda Ilunga, founder of the Chokwé ethnic group. Easily recognisable thanks to its ample curved side winged headdress (cipenya-mutwe), made up of various materials, specifically a wicker frame covered with fabric, brass, leather, beads. The oversized chief had taught his people the art of hunting. The chiefs had a major function in the propitiation rites intended for the hunting and fertility of women, the objects being adorned with this figure having a protective function. Sitting naked on a pachyderm, the character recalls his privilege on the proceeds of hunting. Indeed, before ...


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450.00

Figure masculine Mangbetu Nebeli
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African art > African Statues > Statue Mangbetu

The typical Mangbetu high headdress stands atop the head of this ancestor effigy. The eyes are enclosed in a delicately sculpted face offering a certain serenity. Wide ears stand out, emphasizing the importance of listening, of perception. The long neck extends from a straight column. Excessive feet and hands contrast with the general morphology. Body paintings and scarifications, evoked by geometric patterns similar to those of the Asua pygmies with which the tribe had relations, and which varied according to the circumstances, are part of the whole. The ancients name beli these figures of ancestors stored out of sight and comparable to those belonging to their secret society nebeli.
In Mangbetu from an early age, children were compressed from the cranial box, which was held ...

Songye Fetish Statue
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African art > African Statues > Statue Songye

The spectacular fetishes of African Songye art.
In the centre of the bouquet of feathers that make up the headdress of our fetish, a sheep horn rises. Among the extra magic accessories with specific virtues, the brass elements nailed to the face and the triple necklace of white beads. A magical statue named Nkisi , nkishi (pl. mankishi), this protective ritual sculpture, dressed in a carefully woven raffia loincloth, frequently features magical elements ( bajimba) inserted into the horns or abdomen. The head takes up the structure and features of the mask kifwebe on a ringed neck. These home protection fetishes are among the most prized in Africa. The Songye considered them dangerous to handle, which is why they were moved with rods inserted under their arms. Nkishi plays the role ...


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Statuette Nkisi Lumweno
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African art > African Statues > FéticheNkisi

The Vili, The Lri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kongo formed the Kôngo group, led by the Ntotela king. Their kingdom reached its apogee in the 16th century with the ivory, copper and slave trade. Similarbeliefs and traditions, they produce a statuary with a codified gesture in relation to their worldview. In the Kongo, the nganga took care of the rituals by activating a spiritual force with a nkondi (pl. nkissi). The term nkisi was then used to refer to the concepts of "sacred" or "divin".This is an object in which one or more magical charges are introduced, like the abdominal cavity, back and headdress of the statuette It's against it. The statuette is named Lumweno , because it was designed to protect what surrounds the birth of twins judged to have ...


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Statue Lagalagana Mumuye
African art > African Statues > Statue Mumuye

Long dangling arms, bent and equipped with hands in spatulas, frame a straight bust that rises over a narrow head. A sagittal crest forms with the remains of ears distended by the curls, only worn by ethnic women, like a strange warrior helmet. Fine incisions engraved on the metal adorn the sculpture.
The statuary emanating from the northwestern region of the benue middle, from Kona Jukun, to the Mumuye and up to the Wurkun populations stands out for a relative lack of ornamentation and a clean stylization. The 100,000 Adamawa speakers form a group called Mumuye and are grouped into villages, dola, divided into two groups: those of fire (tjokwa) relating to blood and red color, guardians of the vabong cult, among which are elected leaders, and those of water, (tjozoza ), related to ...


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480.00

Beembé ancestor figure, Bembé
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African art > African Statues > Bembé Figure

Statuette of male ancestor Bembé,Béembé, which has, engraved on the bust, body marks associated with scarifications, witnesses of the social and initiation evolution of the individual, specific to Kongo cultures. The look is set with bone. The character adopts the pose of dignitaries during interviews. Glossy patina.
Established on the plateaus of the People's Republic of Congo ex. Brazzaville, the small group of Babembé (pl.) was influenced by the Teké rites and culture, but especially by that of the Kongo. Indeed the Beembé, or Babembé, together with the Vili, Yombé, Bwendé and Woyo, were once part of the tribes of the Kongo kingdom.Before a hunt, for it to be fruitful, the nga-bula , chief of the village, interceded with the ancestors through statuettes kneeling in the position ...





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