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African art - Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn:

Clay jars are closely associated with the daily life of African populations. Made from the material of mud ponds and rivers, the rather heterogeneous paste allows the production of objects with thick walls such as jars. Many terracotta objects were discovered in Africa during the 20th century. The Nok of Nigeria, dating from 900 to 1500, are among the most recent. In West Africa, notably in Mali, fragments have been discovered and dated from 9 to 12,000 years B.C.


Bura funerary urn
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Bura funerary urn

Remarkable, African Bura art includes three types of archaeological sites in the Niger Valley: sites with necropolises where coffin jars, funerary urns, etc ... Sites with ritual vocations where ceremonies were happening and the religious rites. The habitation sites where we find the usual objects. Herisse in his height of vertical lines composed of small circular reliefs, this conical receptacle was placed in the tomb of the deceased among personal effects like his weapons and clothing that he might need in the afterlife, among his bones and teeth. The piece has the same patterns placed horizontally around the perimeter of its lower base.


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Yoruba head
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African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Yoruba head

Made in the Cameroonian Grasslands using the traditional decorative technique using multicolored glass beads, this head reproduces the famous effigies of sovereigns. Carefully applied to a terracotta surface, the pearls accentuate the features and the royal headdress with strongly contrasting colors, while padouk powder enhances the inside of the ears and mouth. In African art, the artistic movement of which these sculptures are a part bears the name of the ancient religious capital of Nigeria, Ifè, one of the many city-states established by the Yoruba. This civilization succeeded the Nok civilization. This city-state of Ilé-Ifé, whose rise culminated from the 12th to the 15th century, had an artistic tradition of royal portraits imbued with realism, funeral effigies in bronze but also ...


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Yoruba head
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African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Yoruba head

Made in the Cameroonian Grasslands using the traditional decorative technique using multicolored glass beads, this head reproduces the famous effigies of sovereigns. Carefully applied to a terracotta surface, the pearls accentuate the features and the royal headdress with strongly contrasting colors, while padouk powder enhances the inside of the ears and mouth. In African art, the artistic movement of which these sculptures are a part bears the name of the ancient religious capital of Nigeria, Ifè, one of the many city-states established by the Yoruba. This civilization succeeded the Nok civilization. This city-state of Ilé-Ifé, whose rise culminated from the 12th to the 15th century, had an artistic tradition of royal portraits imbued with realism, funeral effigies in bronze but also ...


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Yoruba head
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Yoruba head

Made in the Cameroonian Grasslands using the traditional decorative technique using multicolored glass beads, this head reproduces the famous effigies of sovereigns. Carefully applied to a terracotta surface, the pearls accentuate the features and the headdress with strongly contrasting colors.
In African art, the artistic movement of which these sculptures are a part bears the name of the ancient religious capital of Nigeria, Ifè, one of the many city-states established by the Yoruba. This civilization succeeded the Nok civilization. This city-state of Ilé-Ifé, whose rise culminated from the 12th to the 15th century, had an artistic tradition of royal portraits imbued with realism, funeral effigies in bronze but also in terracotta.


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150.00

Nok head in terracotta
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African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Nok Head

This Nok head is accompanied by its thermoluminescence test carried out in 1996 by the German laboratory Ralf Kotalla (TL 961155), which confirms a seniority of more or less 2,200 years. Estimated in the auction room between 2,000 and 2,500 euros, this African terracotta comes from the Guy Mercier collection, consultant for the Solvay group, and passed down from generation to generation. At the beginning of the 20th century, Guy Mercier began to collect a vast collection of African tribal art. While radiating in West and Central Africa as part of his work, and collecting in-situ works, the majority of his collection nevertheless comes from \


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Lwena Mulondo ceramic jar
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Luena jar

Jar with a human figurative motif, adorned with a juxtaposition of checkerboards, and a face on which are inscribed the traditional scarifications formerly in use among the Lwena.
Dark brown slip.
Of Lunda origin, the Lwena (or even Lovale , or Luvale ) emigrated from Angola to Zaire in the 19th century, pushed back by the Chokwe. Some became slave traders, others, the Lovales, found refuge in Zambia and near the Zambezi in Angola. Their society is matrilineal, exogamous and polygamous. The Lwena have become known for their honey-colored sculptures, embodying figures of deceased ancestors and chiefs, and their masks linked to the initiation rites of the mukanda.


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280.00

Mangbetu terracotta vase
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African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Jarre Mangbetu

A globular body surmounted by a female head styled according to the barrels of the ethnic group affirms the elegance of mangbetu pottery, symbol of fertility. The motifs engraved on the surface echo the traditional scarifications. The work of ceramics, in West and Central Africa, is carried out by women, wives of blacksmiths in the majority of cases. The Mangbetu women, who also produced basketry, excelled in this art.
In the forest in northeastern Zaire, the Mangbetu kingdom has expressed itself through architectural works that impressed European visitors in the 19th century. Their furniture, weapons, adornments and statuary were imbued with a rare aesthetic quality. The Mangbetu story was based on the refinement of his court but also on cannibalistic customs. King Mangbetu Munza ...


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Komaland head
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Komaland head

Typical in African art, the Kronkronbali Komaland heads, meaning "children of yesteryear", have marked features, often coarse. A mouth with full lips. The eyes, nose, eyebrows, beards and whiskers are usually formed by earthen bulges. The head, at the top, is concave and pierced.
These heads seem to have been sculpted as such, without a body, reminiscent of Akan or Anyi statuary. They have the appearance of a sort of plug, sunk into the ground in a circular fashion around tumuli, tombs that are themselves circular and covered with stones. Object of excavations. The first ones were discovered in the years 1970-80 by German anthropologists who dated them between the XIII° and XIX° century.


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150.00

Zimba Nkisi figure in terra cotta
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Zimba figure

Like the Legas, the Zimbas have educational sculptures associated with initiation rites, but they also have anthropomorphic sculptures, in this case in terracotta, with openings for magical charges at the top of the head.
Erosions, heterogeneous patina with residual ochre incrustations.
The Zimba, also called Binja, are close neighbors of the Lega of the Pangi and Shabunda region of the DRC. Subject to Lega influence, they share some institutional similarities with the Lega and Luba. Whether they live in the forest or in the savannah, the symbolism of their art and rituals are associated with hunting, which is of major importance. They are also patrilineal groups that have eventually supplanted the matrilineal organization of their society. Like the Lega, the ...


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290.00

Head Kronkronbali Komaland
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African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Head Komaland

Ex-French tribal art collection.
Typical in African art, the kronkronbali Komaland heads, meaning " children of yesteryear", have marked features, often roughly. A mouth with luscious lips. The eyes, nose, eyebrows, beards and whiskers are, more often than not, formed of earthen bulges. The head, at the top, is concave and pierced.
These heads appear to have been sculpted as such, without bodies, reminiscent of the statuary Akan or Anyi. They look like a kind of cork, pressed in a circular way around tumuli, tombs themselves circular and covered with stones. Search subject.
The first ones were discovered in the 1970s and 1980s by German anthropologists who dated them between the 13th and 19th centuries. Base included.


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Mangbetu figurative jar
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Mangbetu Pot

Vase with a neck showing a human head with large pierced ears. Sets of incised motifs decorate the sides. Black slip. Abrasions, broken handle. Ceramic work in West and Central Africa is carried out by women, the wives of blacksmiths in most cases. The Mangbetu women, who also produced basketry, excelled in this art.
Established in the forest in northeastern Zaire, the Mangbetu kingdom expressed itself through architectural works that impressed European visitors in the 19th century. Their furniture, weapons, ornaments and statuary were imbued with a rare aesthetic quality. Mangbetu history was indeed based on the refinement of its court but also on cannibal customs. King Mangbetu "Munza" was nicknamed "the cannibal king". The ethnologist G.A. Schweinfurth in 1870 described the ...


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290.00

Jarre Mangbetu terracotta
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African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Mangbetu Pottery

This ceramic vase, whose conical neck is carefully highlighted by successive ribs, and whose regular globular body is adorned with a decorative frieze, affirms the elegance of mangbetu productions. The work of ceramics, in West and Central Africa, is carried out by women, wives of blacksmiths in the majority of cases. The Mangbetu women, who also produced basketry, excelled in this art. Black patina speckled with abraded light areas.
In the forest in northeastern Zaire, the Mangbetu kingdom has expressed itself through architectural works that impressed European visitors in the 19th century. Their furniture, weapons, adornments and statuary were imbued with a rare aesthetic quality. The Mangbetu story was based on the refinement of his court but also on cannibalistic customs. King ...


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Lobi/Birifor Pottery
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African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Lobi pottery

This hemispherical container, a jar equipped with a neck, is said to fall into the category of "bulabir", which become sacred after the death of their owner (Daniela Bologno). The populations of the same cultural region, grouped under the name "lobi", form one fifth of the inhabitants of Burkina Faso. They are not very numerous in Ghana and have also settled in the north of the Ivory Coast. It was at the end of the 18th century that the Lobi, coming from northern Ghana, settled among the indigenous Thuna and Puguli, the Dagara, the Dian, the Gan and the Birifor. The Lobi believe in a creator God named Thangba Thu, to whom they turn through the worship of numerous intermediate spirits, the Thil, who are supposed to protect them, with the help of the diviner, against a host of plagues. ...


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Diola Terracotta
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African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Diola Pottery

Symbols of fertility in the traditional and ritual African art of Senegal
Etablie in Lower Casamance, the Diola ethnic group is made up of Floup, Baïnouk, Mandjak, and Balante. They derive their livelihood from growing rice, eaten reduced to flour. The Mandjak practice weaving. The blacksmiths, from a caste of two families, also work the wood and are supposed to transmit leprosy and cure it. The artisanal life of the Diola is distinguished by the creation of jewelry, ceremonial adornments, weaving, basketry, leather and metal work. In addition to the manufacture of abundant basketry, the Diola work not only terracotta for a utilitarian but also ritual purpose, the animist cults maintain themselves despite the presence of Islam.  The steps of the manufacture of this naturalistic ...


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Beaded head
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African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Beaded head

Ex-spanish African art collection.
Made in the Cameroonian Grasslands using the traditional decorative technique using multicolored glass beads, this head reproduces the famous effigies of sovereigns. Meticulously applied to a terracotta surface, the beads accentuate the features and the royal headdress with strongly contrasting colours, while padouk powder lifts the inside of the ears and mouth.
In African art, the artistic current of which these sculptures are part is named after the ancient religious capital of Nigeria, Ifè, one of the many city-states established by the Yoruba.This civilization succeeded the Nok civilization. This city-state of Ilé-Ifé, whose rise culminated from the 12th to the 15th century, had an artistic tradition of royal portraits imbued with ...


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Pearl head in terracotta
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African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Beaded head

Made in the Cameroonian Grasslands using the traditional decorative technique using multicolored glass beads, this head reproduces the famous effigies of sovereigns. Meticulously applied to a terracotta surface, the beads accentuate the features and the royal headdress with strongly contrasting colours, while padouk powder lifts the inside of the ears and mouth.
In African art, the artistic current of which these sculptures are part is named after the ancient religious capital of Nigeria, Ifè, one of the many city-states established by the Yoruba.This civilization succeeded the Nok civilization. This city-state of Ilé-Ifé, whose rise culminated from the 12th to the 15th century, had an artistic tradition of royal portraits imbued with realism, funerary effigies in bronze but also in ...


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Pearl head in terracotta
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Beaded head

Made in the Cameroonian Grasslands using the traditional decorative technique using multicolored glass beads, this head reproduces the famous effigies of sovereigns. Meticulously applied to a terracotta surface, the beads accentuate the features and the royal headdress with strongly contrasting colours, while padouk powder lifts the inside of the ears and mouth.
In African art, the artistic current of which these sculptures are part is named after the ancient religious capital of Nigeria, Ifè, one of the many city-states established by the Yoruba.This civilization succeeded the Nok civilization. This city-state of Ilé-Ifé, whose rise culminated from the 12th to the 15th century, had an artistic tradition of royal portraits imbued with realism, funerary effigies in bronze but also in ...


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Pearl head in terracotta
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African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Tête Ifé

Made in the Cameroonian Grasslands using traditional decorative technique using multicolored glass beads, this head reproduces the famous effigies of sovereigns. Meticulously applied to a terracotta surface, the beads accentuate the features and the royal headdress with strongly contrasting colours, while padouk powder lifts the inside of the ears and mouth.
In African art, the artistic current of which these sculptures are part is named after the ancient religious capital of Nigeria, Ifè, one of the many city-states established by the Yoruba.This civilization succeeded the Nok civilization. This city-state of Ilé-Ifé, whose rise culminated from the 12th to the 15th century, had an artistic tradition of royal portraits imbued with realism, funerary effigies in bronze but also in ...


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Kuyu totemic figure in terracotta
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Terracotta Kouyou

Legs joined, arms along the body devoid of feet, this figure represented seated was made of terracotta. It is decorated with many polychrome decorative motifs.
Two totemic clans once formed the Kuyu ethnic group, living along the river of the same name, in the northwest of the People's Republic of Congo: in the west that of the panther, and in the east that of the snake. A secret male association, Ottoté , played an important political role in the appointment of leaders. The initiation of the young men ended with the revelation of the serpent god Ebongo represented in the form of a head. The dances Kibe-kibe that accompanied the ceremony reactivated the successive stages of creation. The Panther clan had a drum as an emblem. For its part, the snake's had carved heads, painted in ...


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140.00

Jarre Mambila
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Jarre Mambila

Equipped with an anthropo-zoomorphic spout, the spherical container is studded with peg patterns, which echo those of the hairstyle of the male figure forming the collar. The patina is divided between yellow ochre and red ochre in a lower proportion. A second circular orifice appears on the back under the back of the creature whose head is in the image of the mask suaga representing an animal difficult to identify, although the dog has a role in the holiday rituals suaga .
Despite their small number, the thirty thousand Mambila (or Mambilla, Mambere, Nor, Torbi, Lagubi, Tagbo, Tongbo, Bang, Ble, Juli, Bea) (U.S. men" , in fulani), located in northwestern Cameroon, on both sides of the border of Cameroon and Nigeria, have created a large number of masks and statues easily ...


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Anthropomorphic figure Nok
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African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Statue Enough

This African terracotta Nok is from the Guy Mercier collection, consultant for the Solvay group, and passed down from generation to generation. At the beginning of the 20th century, Guy Mercier began to assemble a vast collection of African tribal art. While radiating in West and Central Africa as part of his work, and collecting in-situ works, the majority of his collection is nevertheless derived from Curiosity cabinets which abounded in European capitals during the 1920s. It also comes from prestigious galleries (Paris, Brussels, London, New York)The character stands on a globe pierced at the base. These types of figures are supposed to function as funerary statues, in addition to other little-known uses.
The exploitation of tin deposits in central Nigeria allowed the ...


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