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African art - Terracotta:

Clay jars are closely associated with the daily life of African populations. Made from the material of mud ponds and rivers, the rather heterogeneous paste allows the production of objects with thick walls such as jars. Many terracotta objects were discovered in Africa during the 20th century. The Nok of Nigeria, dating from 900 to 1500, are among the most recent. In West Africa, notably in Mali, fragments have been discovered and dated from 9 to 12,000 years B.C.


Luena jar
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Luena jar

Jar with a human figurative motif, adorned with a juxtaposition of checkerboards, and a face on which are inscribed the traditional scarifications formerly in use among the Lwena.
Dark brown slip.
Of Lunda origin, the Lwena (or even Lovale , or Luvale ) emigrated from Angola to Zaire in the 19th century, pushed back by the Chokwe. Some became slave traders, others, the Lovales, found refuge in Zambia and near the Zambezi in Angola. Their society is matrilineal, exogamous and polygamous. The Lwena have become known for their honey-colored sculptures, embodying figures of deceased ancestors and chiefs, and their masks linked to the initiation rites of the mukanda.


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240.00

Bura Head
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Bura Head

Belgian collection of African art
The fragmentary Bura sculpture, with its stylized features, is accompanied by gaps, cracks and restorations. It is not accompanied by TL.
The Bura culture, centered in the Niger River valley of Niger and Burkina Faso, is recognized for its Iron Age, spanning from the 3rd century CE until the 13th century. Recently discovered in 1975, it remains relatively unknown despite archaeological excavations beginning in 1983. Artifacts from the Bura culture include terracotta funerary urns, iron arrowheads and brass jewelry. Among their most notable achievements, the Bura produced terracotta equestrian figures.


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150.00

Fon Ceramic
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Fon Ceramic

Ritual object associated with the voodoo cult of the Fon and Ewe cultures of the coastal areas of Ivory Coast and Ghana, Togo and Benin. Made of ceramic, the object has a globular body surmounted by three heads and two lateral arms as handles. These terracotta sculptures were placed on the altars which received libations of millet groats. Patina in whites, beiges and pink ocher (very slight cracking under one arm)


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750.00

Kongo Pottery
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kongo Pottery

Collection of Belgian African art
Used daily and during divination rites, pacts, ritual ceremonies, this container offers curved sides highlighted by a large frieze. Slight chips on the edges. Dark, smooth slip. Satin black patina, minor chips.


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245.00

Djenne Vase
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Djenne Vase

Ex-Belgian African art collection.
A very sober Djenne-type container, whose orange-pink slip shines through despite the abrasion of the surface. Perforation on the base. As the old Djenne sites are all in a flood zone, artifacts emerge when the waters recede, with locals sometimes discovering them by chance.
In the Mali Empire, terracotta sculptures with red engobe had a funerary connotation.


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190.00

Ceramic Djenne pot
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Ceramic Djenne pot

Ex-Belgian African art collection.
Container of great sobriety of the Djenne type, whose orange slip shows through under a thin beige film. The edges of the neck are slightly damaged.
As the old Djenne sites are all in a flood zone, deeds emerge when the waters recede, the inhabitants sometimes discovering them by chance.
In the Mali Empire, terracotta sculptures with red engobe had a funerary connotation.


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180.00

Beaded head
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Beaded head

Made in the Cameroonian Grasslands using the traditional decorative technique using multicolored glass beads, this head is inspired by the famous effigies of sovereigns. Carefully applied to a terracotta surface, the pearls accentuate the features and the headdress with strongly contrasting colors.
In African art, the artistic movement of which these sculptures are a part bears the name of the ancient religious capital of Nigeria, Ifè, one of the many city-states established by the Yoruba. This civilization succeeded the Nok civilization. This city-state of Ilé-Ifé, whose rise culminated from the 12th to the 15th century, had an artistic tradition of royal portraits imbued with realism, funeral effigies in bronze but also in terracotta.


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180.00

Zimba figure
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Zimba figure

Like the Legas, the Zimbas have educational sculptures associated with initiation rites, but they also have anthropomorphic sculptures, in this case in terracotta, with openings for magical charges at the top of the head.
Erosions, heterogeneous patina with residual ochre incrustations.
The Zimba, also called Binja, are close neighbors of the Lega of the Pangi and Shabunda region of the DRC. Subject to Lega influence, they share some institutional similarities with the Lega and Luba. Whether they live in the forest or in the savannah, the symbolism of their art and rituals are associated with hunting, which is of major importance. They are also patrilineal groups that have eventually supplanted the matrilineal organization of their society. Like the Lega, the ...


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240.00





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