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African art - Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale:

African everyday objects have become true works of art for Westerners. Used for ritual, ceremonial or purely everyday purposes on the African continent. They have never known the European artistic attraction, within the African population.


Tabouret Luba
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African art > Stool > Tabouret Luba

Tribal art collection put up for sale by Jan Putteneers.

Adland of sculpted foundations, regalia of prestige, in the primitive African art.
This female effigy of an ancestor, "recepacle of a deceased sovereign leader" (Luba, Roberts) supports with his fingers fanned the circular tray resting on his cylindrical headdress. The protruding scarifications in the ear converging towards the umbilical, "centre of the world" associated with lineage, those of the lower abdomen, the fullness of volumes, testify to notions of fertility. This stool named lupona, or kioni, kipona, kiona , according to the sources, constitutes the meeting point of the sovereign, his people, and protective spirits and ancestors, where symbolically and spiritually intermingle past and present . It once ...


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Makonde Fetish
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African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Makonde Fetish

African Art Makonde.
Fetish horn from which emerges a sculpted head evoking lipoko and lipico masks. Huge ears frame the realism of expressive features. What takes the place of a bust is wrapped in woven fibers, twisted copper wires, and finally animal skin. The whole is coated with a black patina. Height on base: 51 cm.

The Makonde of northern Mozambique and southern Tanzania wore helmet masks called lipiko during initiation ceremonies for young people. The Makonde venerate an ancestor, which explains the abundance of naturalistic female statuary. Besides the face masks worn during mapiko dances and ngoma ceremonies that educate young people about the demands of marriage and family life. the Makonde also produce body masks featuring the female bust. For the Makonde, ...


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280.00  224.00

Kusu rattle
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kusu rattle

Ex-Luxembourg African art collection.
Sculpted object used by soothsayers, whose anthropomorphic motif recalls the nkisi fetishes of the Songye. Golden brown satin patina, cracks.
The Kusu established on the left bank of the Lualaba have borrowed the artistic traditions of the Luba and the Hemba and have a caste system similar to that Luba . In this region, between the Bembe, Boyo, Hemba, Songye and Tetela, ritual objects were subject to stylistic exchanges and influences. We note here a similarity with Songye fetishes. The singiti statues were kept by the fumu mwalo and honored during ceremonies during which sacrifices were offered to them. Alongside the authority of the hereditary chiefs, secret societies, masculine such as the bukazanzi, and feminine, the bukibilo, ...


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Rungu Stick
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African art > Fly swatter, staff of power, royal sceptre > Rungu Stick

Fetish fly swatter whose handle has been hollowed out at the top. Fine lines, between discreet marks suggesting scarifications, form the face of the subject represented. The section extending the neck is coated with a resin on which necklaces of multicolored pearls fix the horsehair. Shiny patina, desication crack.
A tribe of the Tabwa group, the Rungu are established in a region between the R.D.C. (Democratic Rep. of Congo), Zambia and Tanzania. Under the influence of the neighboring Lubas and Bemba, the Rungu produced prestigious objects intended for dignitaries, stools, combs, spoons and scepters, frequently adorned with figures of couples or twins. Their king, called mwéné tafuna, lives in Zambia. A women's association, Kamanya, has dolls such as those of the Tabwas.


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290.00  232.00

Kwere hairpin
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kwere hairpin

The Zaramo and the tribes that surround them, such as the Kwéré and the Doé, designed dolls generally associated with fertility, but to which other virtues would be attributed. Its primary role is played during the period of confinement of the young initiate Zaramo. The novice will behave towards the object as with a child, and will dance with it during the closing ceremonies of the initiation. In case the young woman does not conceive, she will adopt the "child". Among the Zaramo, this carved motif is repeated on the top of canes, decorates ritual objects and even appears on burial posts.
The shape is recurrent, a stylized head, topped with a double or single crest surmounting a tubular bust without arms on which a slight relief indicates the breasts, such as this sculpted motif at ...


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105.00

Kongo powder flask
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kongo powder flask

Pear-shaped container with a cap, intended to contain powder for wooden guns. This black powder was imported from Europe, making it a carefully preserved luxury commodity. This powder, to which magic virtues were also attributed, often complemented the ingredients of ritual fetishes. It is engraved with decorative motifs and zoomorphic figures. Satin patina.
In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads of the borders between the current DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the Portuguese came into contact with the Kongo and converted their king to Christianity. Although monarchical, the Kongo political system had a democratic aspect because the king was actually placed at the head of the kingdom following an ...


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Carved Ubangi Charm
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Carved Ubangi Charm

Ex-collectie Franse Afrikaanse kunstbr>Onder de vele gebeeldhouwde voorwerpen met betrekking tot jacht en magie, bestaat dit zeldzame type sculptuur, bedoeld om op te hangen, uit een paneel waarop een gezicht is afgebeeld. omlijst met hoorns, en had als charme kunnen dienen voor de hoge officieren van de Lombe-compagnie. Prachtig glanzend donkerbruin patina.
De Ngbaka vormen een homogeen volk uit het noordwesten van de DRC, ten zuiden van Ubangui. De Ngandi wonen in het oosten en de Ngombe in het zuiden. De inwijding van jonge mensen, "gaza" of "ganza" (die kracht geeft) tussen de Ngbaka en de Ngbandi, heeft veel overeenkomsten, door middel van uithoudingsproeven, liederen en dansen. De riten vereisten de aanwezigheid van sculpturen van voorouders. Het was na een periode van ...


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180.00  144.00

Mbuun machete
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Mbuun machete

Sword with a wooden handle (lack and cracks to note) of the Mbuun established in the west of the Democratic Republic of Congo. The contours are abraded, the patina oxidized.
Height on base: 63 cm.
In Africa, before the colonial period, payments were never made in coins. Transactions were made using cowries, pearls, cattle, kola nuts, but also metals, especially iron. These primitive currencies were used during commercial and social exchanges, for dowries in particular, but could also constitute objects of parade or throwing weapons. In Sierra Leone, goods were valued against iron bars called barriferri. The king generally controlled the production or routing of the kingdom's currency. The variety of these metallic forms is wide, and these sometimes take on the appearance of ...


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Baoule Sling
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Baoule Sling

Anthropomorphic slingshot featuring a woman sitting on a chair. This sculpture is distinguished by its fine details. Smooth golden patina and satin finish.
About sixty ethnic groups inhabit the Ivory Coast, including the Baule, in the center, Akans from Ghana, people of the savannah, practicing hunting and agriculture just like the Gouro from whom they borrowed their ritual cults and sculpted masks. Two types of statues are produced by the Baoule, Baulé, in the ritual framework: The Waka-Sona statues, "wooden being" in Baoule, evoke an Assi oussou, being of the earth. They are part of a type of statues intended to be used as a medium by the Komien diviners, who are selected by the asye usu spirits to communicate revelations from the beyond. The second type of statues are ...


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Kongo Cross
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kongo Cross

Among the Kongo chiefs at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, the crucifix served as a symbol of power and authority among the chiefly regalia. A ceremony during the investiture of the chief required that the future ruler receive from the hands of a dignitary, during a codified ritual, a nkangi kiditu. This badge of power, inspired by ancient Christian crucifixes imported by the Portuguese in the 16th century, could also have a therapeutic function, and, in addition to various uses, be brandished during funeral ceremonies during which the object was subjected to libations. palm oil or palm wine.
The cross would not be a motif specific to the Christian world, the Kongo considering that the ...


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Holo panel
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Holo panel

Sculpture dedicated to the cults of affliction nzaambi, also practiced by the Yaka, rituals intended for the difficulties whose divinatory practices had been able to establish the source. If the Holo were probably inspired by Christian iconography, they honored spirits and not a single god. Often intended to promote hunting, fertility or good health, these sculptures had to be ritually coated by the person concerned with different substances. Orange-brown patina. Erosions and small accidents. Height on base: 32 cm.
Located in the Democratic Congo between the Yaka and the Tchokwé of Angola, the small Holo ethnic group migrated from the Angolan coast to settle near the banks of the Kwango. The Holo produced helm masks and prestige items such as openwork panels for the ruling ...


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Ashanti Yoke
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Ashanti Yoke

Aesthetics of everyday life for the African art of Côte d'Ivoire.
Stirrup depicting a human bust whose face offers fine features and subtle scarified marks under a loose hairstyle.
The figurative motifs of these pulleys are deployed in a wide variety: cephalomorphs or zoomorphs among the Baoulé and the Gouro, the Senufo as for them frequently adorned them with hornbill figures. Golden brown patina of use, desiccation cracks
In Côte d'Ivoire, the most ordinary objects a priori had to meet aesthetic criteria. Furniture, ornaments, utensils, fabrics, are a pretext for a refined artistic expression on the part of the sculptors. The technique of cotton weaving spread in West Africa thanks to the displacements of the Dioulas. Before colonization, cotton fiber textiles, ...


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240.00  192.00

Boa panel
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Boa panel

Supposed to render invulnerable and in order to terrify the enemy, the African art mask kpongadomba des boa was commanded by the chief kumu who offered it to the most valiant warrior. It was then kept in his wife's hut. This panel intended to be hung in the boxes is carved from a mask motif with oversized ears, perforated like the pavilions of the ears of the Eastern Boa, the bavobongo. It gave an impressive appearance to its wearer, accentuated by the contrast of colors. Close to the Mangbetu and Zande, the Boa live in the savannah in the north of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Some Boas have reportedly used these masks for educational purposes with children, since the pacification of the Uele region.
Patine polychrome matte, dandruff. Abrasions, restorations using metal staples.


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280.00  224.00

Kongo Crucifix
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kongo Crucifix

Among the Kongo chiefs at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, the crucifix served as a symbol of power and authority among the chiefly regalia. A ceremony during the investiture of the chief required that the future ruler receive from the hands of a dignitary, during a codified ritual, a nkangi kiditu. This badge of power, inspired by ancient Christian crucifixes imported by the Portuguese in the 16th century, could also have a therapeutic function, and, in addition to various uses, be brandished during funeral ceremonies during which the object was subjected to libations. palm oil or palm wine.
The cross is not a motif specific to the Christian world, the Kongo consider that the four ...


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Mangbetu Horn
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Mangbetu Horn

This sculpted figure surmounting a bovine horn depicts a naked woman, only wearing a toque, squatting with her hands behind her back. The hairstyle enhances the elongation of the skull, typical of the group, which a compression of the head from an early age gradually deformed. The ancients call beli the anthropomorphic figures embodying ancestors, stored out of sight, and comparable to those belonging to their secret society nebeli.
Smooth patina, desication cracks.
Height on base: 45 cm.
The Mangebetu kingdom in northern Congo produced architectural works that impressed European visitors in the 19th century. Their furniture, weapons, ornaments and statuary were imbued with a rare aesthetic quality. The ethnologist G.A. Schweinfurth in 1870 described its symmetry ...


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Mbala Insignia
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Mbala Insignia

A prestigious emblem for chefs, this figurative adze is coated with a velvety black patina and is extended by an unusual blade, the end of which is divided into two loops. The face, carved in the heart, recalls the Kwese sculpture. A crocodile figure, whose tail runs between heads rising in high relief, hugs the handle.
Coming from Angola in the 17th century, the Mbala settled in northwestern Zaire and to the east among the Pelende, Suku, Pende, and Yaka. Formerly matrilineal, they are made up of clans headed by the maternal uncle. The chief was in charge of the worship of the ancestors, however quite limited. Following a retreat of a few days, the royal insignia and charms were attributed to him, intended to fight the powers opposing hunting, social peace, and harvesting.


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Teke spoon
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Teke spoon

Ex-Belgian African art collection.
Object of prestige and parade of the teke chiefs, this spoon has a long handle carved with an ancestor figure. The neck is enclosed in animal skin.
Established between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized into chiefdoms whose chief was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu, had the right of life or death over his family whose importance determined his prestige. The chief of the clan, ngantsié , kept the great protective fetish tar mantsié which supervised all the ceremonies. It is the powerful witch doctor and diviner who "charged" with magical elements, against payment, the individual statuettes or nkumi . According to the Téké, wisdom was absorbed and stored in the ...


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Chokwe Spoon
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Chokwe Spoon

Traditional African Chokwe art and ceremonial objects.
This ceremonial spoon formed of a deep bowl presents at the top the figure of the wife of the mythical hero founder of the ethnic group, Chibinda Ilunga. A shiny smooth patina, once due to the repeated application of castor oil and coloring vegetable decoctions, covers the whole of this piece of African Chokwe art. Erosions on the face.
Height on base: 42 cm.
Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwé were then subjected to the Lunda empire from which they inherited a new hierarchical system and the sacredness of power. The Chokwé did not have centralized power but large chiefdoms. They were the ones who attracted artists wishing to put their know-how at the exclusive service of the court. ...


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290.00

Bembe Spoon
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African art > Spoons, ladles > Bembe Spoon

The Beembé are appreciated in African art for the care and finishing given to the sculptures of ancestors.
Spoon whose handle features an anthropomorphic bust whose face and hands are carefully detailed. The contours of the cuilleron have slight scratches. Shiny patina. Height on base: 40 cm.
Established on the plateaus of the People's Republic of Congo ex.Brazzaville, and not to be confused with the Bembe group of northern Lake Tanganinyika, the small group Babembé, Béembé, was influenced by the Téké rites and culture, but especially by that of the Kongos. Settled in the current Republic of Congo, the Béembé originally formed the kingdom of Kongo, with the Vili, Yombé, Bwendé and Woyo. Hunting being a major activity, the ancestors were invoked through statuettes. These ...


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Djenne Statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Djenne Statue

Traditional African art can be a source of inspiration for contemporary craftsmanship, a representation inspired by authentic Djenne statues, a man kneeling, head turned to the right. The old sites Djenné are all in flood zone, the inhabitants have always found heads that outcrop when the water withdraws. Rolled by the waves, these pieces are found very far from their original archaeological site.


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745.00  596.00

Tanzania Comb
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Tanzania Comb

Comb whose figurative motif forms a female bust. The hairstyle is divided into two shells, characteristic of the Doé and the Kwéré. Ample ears and eyes encrusted with pearls under a domed forehead make up the main features of the face. Glossy dark patina. Height on base: 26 cm.
In the southern coastal region of Tanzania, around Dar-es-Salaam, a relatively homogeneous group produced most of the artistic productions. It includes the Swahili, Kaguru, Doé, Kwéré, Luguru, Zaramo, Kami. The second region is made up of a territory covering southern Tanzania to Mozambique, where some Makonde and the Yao, the Ngindo, Mwéra, and Makua live. In the North-East of Tanzania, the Chaga, Paré, Chamba, Zigua, Massaï, Iraqw, Gogo, and Héhé have an artistic production presenting similarities with ...


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