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African art - Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale:

African everyday objects have become true works of art for Westerners. Used for ritual, ceremonial or purely everyday purposes on the African continent. They have never known the European artistic attraction, within the African population.


Luba Shankadi neck support
African art > Head rest > Luba headrest

Ex-collection of Belgian African art.

The Shankadis belong to the luba group, and have the same associations and structures. Their mostly realistic statuary is characterized by spectacular hairstyles, a smooth surface, and smaller lower limbs. The "cascade" hairstyle illustrates one of the different braided compositions fashionable in Zaire in the 1800s, highlighting the social status of the wearer. The female effigy symbolizes the Luba royalty and the major role of women within it. Neck rests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Locally abraded dark brown oiled patina.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the ...


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100.00

Luba comb
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Luba comb

The tribal art of Africa proves once again that any usual object can become an artistic support. The decorative aspect of an object is never its intrinsic function. In African art, any everyday object can be transformed into a masterpiece while keeping its usefulness. The major role played by women in the political life of the kingdom is illustrated by the recurrence of the female motif in Luba art. The latter, which stood out for its prestige and quality, had a great influence on neighboring groups. This comb is surmounted by a protective effigy embodying a political and spiritual intermediary, a role held by the woman in Luba royalty. Her headdress, behind a wide band revealing a shaven forehead, evokes one of those worn by Luba women at the beginning of the 20th century. The secrets ...


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90.00

Luba comb
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Luba comb

Ex Portuguese African art collection. The effigies are depicted facing each other, the head at the end of a long ringed neck, resting on the shoulder of the one opposite. They are embracing each other in a curious position, the right leg of one raised to the height of the other's thigh. Both figures have a headdress pulled back behind a squared band, a reference to the elaborate quadrifoliate headdresses of dignitaries. Dark oiled patina, satin sheen, slight lack of one of the teeth of the comb. African tribal art proves once again that any common object can become an artistic support. The decorative aspect of an object is never its intrinsic function. In African art, any everyday object can be transformed into a masterpiece while keeping its usefulness. The major role played by women ...


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90.00

Kuba Flycatcher
African art > Fly swatter, staff of power, royal sceptre > Kuba Flycatcher

The Shoowa settled within the Kuba kingdom and gradually adopted some of its traditions. Organized in a matrilineal society, the Shoowa are above all skilled weavers, renowned for their raffia textiles which they export to neighboring groups. But they are also potters and engravers. The Kuba and the tribes between the Sankuru and Kasai rivers, including the Bushoong and Dengese, also from the Mongo group, are known for the refinement of prestige objects created for the higher ranks of their society. The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the Bushoong, who are still ruled by a king. It is the most prolific group in Western Kasai. Ritual ceremonies were still an opportunity to display decorative arts and masks to honor the spirit of the deceased or to honor the king. Most of ...


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180.00

Mbole Short sword currency
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Mbole currency

The blade of the sword, weapon of prestige then currency of transaction, carries in its center of weak traces of hammered reasons. The contours are irregular, the patina oxidized rusty orange.
In Africa, before the colonial period, payments were never made in coins. Transactions were made by means of cowrie shells, pearls, cattle, kola nuts, but also metals, especially iron. These primitive currencies were used for commercial and social exchanges, particularly for dowries, but could also be used as parade objects or throwing weapons. In Sierra Leone, goods were valued in relation to iron bars called barriferri. The king usually controlled the production or delivery of the kingdom's currency. The variety of these metal forms is wide, and they sometimes take the form of ...


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180.00

Beembé Fly-Hunting Channel
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Beembé figure

Ex-collection of Belgian African art.

Small, meticulously sculpted figure, with large digitized hands placed in front of the bust, and under which a pastille indicates the umbilicus. The legs are fleshy, tight, and half bent. The face with stylized features appears meditative. Satin patina with granular residual incrustations. Established on the plateaus of the People's Republic of Congo (formerly Brazzaville), and not to be confused with the Bembé group north of Lake Tanganinyika, the small group Babembé, Béembé, was influenced by the Teke rites and culture, but especially by that of the Kongo. Settled in the current Republic of Congo, the Béembé originally formed the kingdom of the Kongo, with the Vili, Yombé, Bwendé and Woyo. They were under the tutelage of the king ntotela ...


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150.00

Yaka Fly Hunt
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Yaka Fly-Hunting

Prestigious objects in African art Yaka
Among the feasts, ritual sculptures and ceremonial objects, belonging to a chef or a soothsayer, this fly-hunt with a carved handle is associated with the prestige of authority. It has a thin belt braided with vegetable fibers. The tuft of hair is held at the handle thanks to cleverly intertwined wicker rods. Shard on the ringed section. Satin patina.
Aerarchic and authoritarian, composed of fearsome warriors, Yaka society was ruled by lineage leaders with the right to life and death over their subjects. Hunting and the resulting prestige are an opportunity for the Yaka today to invoke ancestors and to resort to rituals using charms related to the institution .Khosi. The initiation society of young people is the n-khanda , which is found ...


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Tabwa ceremonial axe
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Tabwa Axe

A prestigious object displayed during ceremonies and ritual dances, this weapon has an anthropomorphic handle depicting an ancestor with braids drawn towards the nape of the neck. Similar to the Luba, whose effigy bears abdominal scarification marks, the Tabwa and the populations that surround them generally depict the body in its entirety. Smooth mahogany red patina. The Tabwa are an ethnic group present in the southeast of the DRC. Simple farmers with no centralized power, they federated around tribal chiefs after coming under the influence of the Luba. It is mainly during this period that their artistic movement was expressed through statues and masks. The Tabwa practiced ancestor worship and dedicated some of their statues to them. Animists, their beliefs are ...


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290.00

Dan Wakemia figurative spoon
African art > Spoons, ladles > Dan spoon

Usual objects in African art.
The sculpted handle here represents legs with powerful muscles. They are frozen in a dynamic posture evoking a dance movement. Black brown patina and kaolin. The tribal art of the Dan also produces objects of daily use, including these carved wooden utensils, Wakemia, used during festive ceremonies, and granted by the villagers to the women leading the traditional women's associations. These shovels, symbols of prestige, will be joyfully brandished during the "dances of the hospitable woman" (wakede) of the great meals organized under their authority. For the Dan of Côte d'Ivoire, also called Yacouba, two distinct universes are opposed: that of the village, composed of its inhabitants and its animals, and that of the forest, its vegetation ...


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280.00

Dogon ceremonial hair pin
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon Pin

Jan Putteneers African Art Collection for sale.

This dogon sculpture, a traditional figurative jewel, adorned with a zoomorphic subject, accompanied the ceremonial dress of religious leaders hogon responsible for the cult of the lebed, the mythical snake, and the priests of Binou. Small metal objects fashioned using the lost wax technique were widespread in the interior delta region of Niger, with copper being made possible by trans-Saharan trade. Excavations on the Bandiagara plateau have uncovered remains of steel sites prior to the 15th century, when the Dogons arrived. Blacksmiths form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim. They now produce weapons, tools, and also work wood. They are also believed to be associated with the primordial beings of the god Ama, ...


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Luba neck support
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African art > Head rest > Luba headrest

Ex Belgian African art collection.
.The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neck rests and stools made up of a caryatid figure. The figures adorning this neckrest, which must preserve the complex headdress of its owner, refer to Luba royalty. But the neck rests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Medium brown patina abraded.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of Ilunga Kalala, who had the old king Kongolo, venerated since then in the form of ...


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Cephalomorphic cup Kuba Lele
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kuba cup

Among the prestige objects of the Kuba groups, this cephalomorphic bowl decorated with geometric patterns has a handle. Satin patina.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the higher ranks of their society. Indeed, several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined designs including cups, drinking horns and beakers. The Lele are established in the west of the Kuba kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers. Intercultural exchanges between the Bushoong of the Kuba territory and the Lele have made the attribution of certain objects difficult, as both groups use the same iconography, composed of faces with elaborate hairstyles and geometric decorative motifs. 


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140.00

Ngeende Kuba anthropomorphic cup
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Ngeende Cup

Ex-German African art collection.
. Various forms of palm wine bowls, whose ornamentation sought to glorify the qualities of their owners, were carved for the dignitaries of the Kuba groups. Wine was extracted twice a day from raffia palm trees planted for this purpose, and sold by the cup. Lustrous black-brown patina.
Among the clans kuba , the Ngeende produced an abundance of prestigious sculptures, sometimes intended for neighboring groups. According to tradition, the Ngeende, who are said to be descended from the mythical ancestor Woot, came from north of the Sankuru River. After being defeated by a bushoong king, they joined the Kuba kingdom in the 16th century. They produced a large number of masks associated with the story of the mythical ancestor Woot. The ...


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Headrest Luba Shankadi
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African art > Head rest > Luba headrest

Ex-collection German African art.

The Luba are renowned for their refined statuary and famous in particular for their neck rests and stools made of a caryatid figure. The seated figures, interlaced, one of them leaning on the knees of the second, symbolize Luba royalty. The neck rests protecting the headdresses during the night were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. The figures embody the spirit of an ancestor, vidiye and have a cascading hairstyle in the Shankadi style. Warm brown patina, residual ochre inlays. The Luba (Baluba in tchiluba) are a people from Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). ...


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Ngombe Knife
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Ngombe Knife

In northwestern Zaire, south of the Ubangi River,live the 6000 Moswea-Ngombe of Bantu language. Their neighbors are the Ngbandi and the Ngbaka and various banda groups. They knew no god but expected favors from their ancestors, among them health and prosperity. Their throwing knives used for hunting were used as currency. This sickle knife, comparable to those of the Mangbetu, has a handle sheathed in copper wire and a blade with a reddish oxidized patina. In Africa, before the colonial period, payments were never made in coins; transactions were made using cowries, beads, cattle, kola nuts, but also metals, especially iron. These primitive currencies were used for commercial and social exchanges, particularly for dowries, but they could also be used as parade objects or throwing ...


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Ceremonial spoon Mangbetu
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African art > Spoons, ladles > Spoon Mangbetu

The mangbetu's ceremonial objects have a wide variety, such as this prestigious spoon whose anthropomorphic handle borrows the silhouette of a woman wearing traditional body motifs, inspired by the tattoos of the neighboring Asua pygmies, evolving according to the circumstances. She also wears the famous headdress that resulted from compression by raffia ties of the cranial box from an early age. The hair was later \


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Slingshot Baule
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Baoule Sling

Anthropomorphic slingshot featuring a woman sitting on a chair. This sculpture is distinguished by its fine details. Smooth golden patina and satin finish.
About sixty ethnic groups inhabit the Ivory Coast, including the Baule, in the center, Akans from Ghana, people of the savannah, practicing hunting and agriculture just like the Gouro from whom they borrowed their ritual cults and sculpted masks. Two types of statues are produced by the Baoule, Baulé, in the ritual framework: The Waka-Sona statues, "wooden being" in Baoule, evoke an Assi oussou, being of the earth. They are part of a type of statues intended to be used as a medium by the Komien diviners, who are selected by the asye usu spirits to communicate revelations from the beyond. The second type of statues are ...


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95.00

Lobi Slingshot
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Lobi Slingshot

The carved pattern of this Lobi object is supposed to contain the "khele", a power present in every human being and which, following the death of an individual or an animal, must be mastered in order not to harm. Golden brown patina, shiny. Cracks.
The populations of the same cultural region, grouped together under the name "Lobi", form one fifth of the inhabitants of Burkina Faso. Although they are not very numerous in Ghana, they have also settled in the north of the Ivory Coast. In the late 18th century, the Lobi came from northern Ghana and settled among the indigenous Thuna and Puguli, the Dagara, Dian, Gan and Birifor. The Lobi believe in a creator God named Thangba Thu, to whom they turn through the worship of numerous intermediate spirits, the Thil, who are supposed to ...


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95.00

Lobi Slingshot
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Lobi Slingshot

The carved pattern of this Lobi object is supposed to contain the "khele", a power present in every human being and which, following the death of an individual or an animal, must be mastered in order not to harm. Golden brown patina, shined by use. The populations of the same cultural region, grouped under the name "Lobi", make up one fifth of the inhabitants of Burkina Faso. Although they are not numerous in Ghana, they have also settled in the north of the Ivory Coast. In the late 18th century, the Lobi came from northern Ghana and settled among the indigenous Thuna and Puguli, the Dagara, Dian, Gan and Birifor. The Lobi believe in a creator God named Thangba Thu, to whom they turn through the worship of numerous intermediate spirits, the Thil, who are supposed to protect them, with ...


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Sanza Zela
African art > Tam Tam, Djembe, musical instruments > Sanza Zela

Ex Belgian African art collection.

Very common in Central Africa, this musical instrument or sanza anthropomorphic offers a sounding board forming the bust of the figure, on which metal slats are attached. The thumbs of both hands will rest on the soundboard to vibrate the front ends of the strips. In Zaire, however, where all the fingers are used as for the piano, groups of instruments play in complementary registers. Brown satin patina, abrasions. Once subject to the Luba, then the Lundas, the Zela have adopted many of their customs and traditions. Established between the Luvua River and Lake Kisale, they are now organized into four chiefdoms under the supervision of leaders of Luba origin. They venerate a primordial couple frequently represented in statuary, mythical ...


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280.00

Kirdi Sickle Currency
African art > Coins in bronze, black iron and other materials > Kirdi Currency

African art and throwing weapons
The Matakam also called Mafa, from the group called Kirdi or "pagans" by the Islamicized peoples,are a population of Central Africa, mostly present in the far north of Cameroon, also in Nigeria. The Kirdi include the Matakam, Kapsiki, Margui, Mofou, Massa, Toupouri, Fali, Namchi, Bata, Do ayo... The Matakam are known to have been the first to come into contact with German settlers. Before the colonial period, transactions were made with cowrie shells, beads, cattle, kola nuts, but also metals, especially iron. These primitive currencies were used for commercial and social exchanges, particularly for dowries, but could also be used as parade objects or throwing weapons. The variety of these metallic forms is wide, and they sometimes take the form ...


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280.00





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