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African art - Usual african items:

African everyday objects have become true works of art for Westerners. Used for ritual, ceremonial, or purely customary purposes on the African continent. They have never known the European artistic attraction, within the African population.


Mnemonic board Luba Lukasa
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African art > Usual african items > Luba board

This tablet with curved edges is surmounted by a head supposed to embody an ancestor communicating with the guardian spirits, 'mvidye', intermediate between the spiritual world and individuals, which can also embody the spirits of nature among the Luba of Kasai. The drawings, colours and layout of the inlays of the plateau are linked to a mnemonic proverb or code associated with the myths, origins and precepts of Luba royalty. This multi-interpretation object allowed followers of the Mbudye to transmit during codified rituals, through stories and songs, the genealogy of the founding heroes, the history of clan migrations, certain codes of the kingdom, etc. H. on pedestal: 37 cm.
Nene brown velvety matte, slightly abraded areas. Height on pedestal: 36cm
Shest the Luba, the ...


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Mangbetu figurative knife
African art > Usual african items > Mangbetu Knife

Among the traditional African weapons, this knife, whose tapered curved blade is accompanied by a circular growth, has an elegant wooden handle with a stylized human motif, associated with ancestors whose spirits were revered. From an early age, upper-class children were compressed in the cranial box, held tight by raffia ties. Later, the hair was 'knitted' on wicker strands and a headband would enser the forehead to bring out the hair and form this majestic headdress accentuating the elongation of the skull.
Parade Arms above all, the Sickle Knives of the Mangbetu formed accessories appreciated during the ritual ceremonies danced and during visits. Established in the forest in northeastern Zaire, between Bomokandi and the River Uele, the Mangbetu kingdom was expressed through ...


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290.00

Nshak Etoffe, Ncak Bushoong
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African art > African Textile > Etoffe Nshak

Prestigious fabrics among the objects of African art KubaProduce d'in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, mainly, subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a textile base in raffia. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or take over the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the weaving technique to the Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the Kuba to the art of forging. It was the men who softened the fibers of young ...

Yaka Musaw neck support
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African art > Usual african items > Yaka headrest

This type of neck-bearing called musaw or m-baambu, kept in the bedrooms, is one of the African tribal art objects incorporating the personal ritual charms of the matrilineal leaders and heads of the family in order to preserve their magnificent tribal headdresses. This bird would refer to the stork. Some of these sculptures had magical charges inserted into discrete cavities. Dark brown glossy patina. Hierarchical and authoritarian, composed of fearsome warriors, Yaka society was governed by lineage leaders with the right to life and death over their subjects. Hunting and the resulting prestige are an opportunity for the Yaka today to invoke ancestors and to resort to rituals using charms related to the institution .Khosi. The initiation society of young people is the n-khanda , which is ...


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Kasai Shoowa Velvet
African art > African Textile > Textile Cuba

Belgian African tribal art collection.
African art and the refinement of Kuba weaving.
Products to Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, a subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real paintings of first art, consist of a textile base in raffia on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by the contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the body scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases they took the value of money, or they also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the velvet weaving technique to Kuba ...


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120.00

Tabwa ceremonial spoon
African art > Spoon > Tabwa Spoon

The Tabwa ('scarifier' and 'write') are an ethnic group present in the south-east of the DRC, around Lake Tanganyika. The tribes of this region, such as the Tumbwe, worship the ancestors mipasi through sculptures held by chiefs or sorcerers.
Simples farmers without centralized power, the Tabwa united around tribal leaders after being influenced by the Luba. It was mainly during this period that their artistic current was expressed mainly through statues but also through masks. The Tabwa worshipped ancestors and dedicated some of their statues to them. Animists, their beliefs are rooted around ngulu, spirits of nature present in plants and rocks. Source: Treasures of Africa Ed. Tervuren Museum.


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180.00

Dogon pharmacopoeia box
African art > African Jar > Dogon Box

With three-foot moving shutters, this small-sized piece of furniture was probably designed to preserve active medicinal preparations prepared on the advice of elders who had been introduced to tree science or . jiridon. The walls are carved with figures of animals and mythical ancestors Nommos, geniuses associated with the creation of the world and guarantors of health and fertility, and a motif reminiscent of the mask kanaga . These are supposed to activate the healing power of the active ingredients. Light brown patina.
The Dogons are a people renowned for their cosmogony, their esotericism, their myths and legends. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living southwest of the Niger Loop in mali's Mopti region (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of ...


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380.00

Ceremonial Pipe Hemba
African art > Usual african items > Pipe Hemba

Sculpted anthropomorphic pipe depicting a male ancestor. Here the abdomen named difu, or 'lineage segment', forms the opening of the object. The majestic head bears carefully chiseled features. The headdress, behind the traditional headband, is gathered in multiple buns. Above, the piece flares into annelures.
Satina. Desication cracks.
The Hemba settled in southeastern Zaire. Once under the rule of the Luba, these farmers and hunters worship ancestors with effigies long attributed to the Luba.The statues singiti were preserved by the fumu mwalo and honored during ceremonies during which ...


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180.00

Short SwordTetela
African art > Usual african items > Tetela Sword

This ceremonial sword consists of a wooden handle surrounded by copper wire, and an open blade. There are also fine decorative hatches.
br-Eds in the Kasai basin, the Tetela of Mongo origin have been the source of constant conflicts with their neighbours. They also participated extensively in the slave trade. Their very diverse sculpture is marked by the influence of groups living in contact with them: in the north, their art has been subjected to the influence of forest populations such as the Mongo, in the northwest that of the Nkutschu, and in the west that of Binji and Mputu. The Kuba traditions were also a source of inspiration, as were those of the Songye in the southwest. Their fetishes are kept out of sight. Animists, they seek to appease and direct the elements thanks to ...


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290.00

Dogon pharmacopoeia box
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African art > Usual african items > Dogon Box

This African art object, a box with two moving shutters, set on three feet, was probably designed to preserve active medicinal preparations prepared according to the advice of elders who had been introduced to the science of trees or . jiridon. The walls are carved with figures of mythical ancestors Nammos , geniuses associated with the creation of the world and guarantors of health and fertility. These are supposed to activate the healing power of the active ingredients. Brown patina.
The Dogons are a people renowned for their cosmogony, their esotericism, their myths and legends. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living southwest of the Niger Loop in mali's Mopti region (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest of ...


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Dogon pharmacopoeia box
African art > African Jar > Dogon Box

This African art object, a box with two moving shutters, set on three feet, was probably designed to preserve active medicinal preparations prepared according to the advice of elders who had been introduced to the science of trees or . jiridon. The walls are carved with breast motifs symbolizing human fertility and fertility. These are supposed to activate the healing power of the active ingredients. At the top is a stylized bird figure. The flanks, on the other hand, bear in bas-relief figures of nommos, the primordial ancestors. Brown patina.
The Dogons are a people renowned for their cosmogony, their esotericism, their myths and legends. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living southwest of the Niger Loop in mali's Mopti region (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near ...


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280.00

Mangbetu Parade Knife
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African art > Usual african items > Mangbetu Knife


Among the traditional African weapons, this knife with a tapered curved blade has a ringed wooden handle. Parade weapons above all, the sickle knives of the Mangbetu formed accessories appreciated during the ritual ceremonies danced and during visits. Established in the forest in northeastern Zaire, between Bomokandi and the River Uele, the Mangbetu kingdom was expressed through architectural works that fascinated European visitors in the 19th century. Several groups established in the south of the Uele were placed under the authority of the Mangbetu kingdom as early as 1820: Bangaba, Makere, Mamvu, etc. A proliferation of prestigious objects, as well as utilitarian objects, were produced for dignitaries.


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Double ritual cut Koopha Yaka
African art > Usual african items > Yaka Cup

The ritual consumption of palm wine in an individual cup, Kopa, Koopha , was the prerogative of the lineage officer or the matrilineal supreme leader at certain ceremonies, such as a wedding. It was then passed on to the next generation. This wide cut offers a figurative handle, the flanks are engraved with patterns forming checkerboards. This type of object incorporated the treasure of the feastia, prestigious objects symbolizing the status and reserved for the chiefdom. This kind of cut was also used in the Suku. (Fig.6 p.17 in Yaka Ed. 5Continents. ) Satin black brown patina, usage prints, eroded contours.
The Suku and Yaka ethnic groups, established in a region between the Kwango and Kwilu rivers in the southern Democratic Republic of Congo, have common origins and have similar ...


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290.00

anthropomorphic Cuba Bushoong cup
African art > Usual african items > Cuba cup

Among the prestigious objects held by members of the Kuba royal family and peripheral groups, such as Bushoong and Dengese, this stunning palm wine cup, remarkably made, features a head drawn on curved legs. The face recalls the morphology of the large royal Kuba masks with a flared hairstyle behind shaved temples. Checkerboard engravings complete the ornamentation. Dark satin patina.
The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the main tribe Bushoong which is still ruled by a king, and whose capital was Nshyeeng or Mushenge. More than twenty types of tribal masks are used in the Kuba or people of lightning, with meanings and functions that vary from group to group. Ritual ceremonies were an opportunity to display decorative arts and masks, in order to honor the spirit of ...


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240.00

Kirdi Beaded Sex Mask
African art > Usual african items > Kirdi Sex Cache

Refined, this ancient work in glass beads, harmoniously combining contrasting triangular patterns, forms a fine but dense texture lined with cauris in the lower part. The loops assembled in two, produced a gentle rattling by colliding during the movements and movements of its wearer.
High on a base: 31 cm and a width of 52.
The Kirdi , or -pagans-, so named by the Islamic peoples, are established in the far north of Cameroon, on the border of Nigeria.They include the Matakam, Kapsiki, Margui, Mofou, Massa, Toupouri, Fali , Namchi, Bata, Do...  They live on agriculture, fishing and livestock. They live in small independent hamlets. Renowned for their terracotta statuettes reminiscent of sao works, they are also known for small leather and metal objects, beaded sex masks and ...


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490.00

Luba cephalomorphic game
African art > Usual african items > Awalé Luba

br-
This awalé game of the mancalas is adorned with a Luba head. This one is styled, behind the headband giving off his traditionally shaved forehead, a toque composed of large braided checkerboards. The apron is dug out of twenty-four alveoli, arranged in four parallel rows. Cores, seeds, pebbles and shells formed the pawns. The object can be laid flat or presented vertically. Powdery ochre patina. Abrasions and shrapnel. br


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390.00

Kota ritual gong
African art > Usual african items > Gong City

A traditional accessory accompanying the various ritual ceremonies, this gong is topped by a figure of copper-plated wooden reliquary, whose design would be characteristic of the Obamba (subgroup kota according to some) or The Mindoumou (or Ondoumbo) of Haut-Ogooué in the north of the Gabon.La patina attests to the age of this piece.
The Bakota live in the eastern part of Gabon, which is rich in iron ore, and some in the Republic of Congo. The blacksmith, in addition to wood carving, made tools for agricultural work as well as ritual weapons. Sculptures playing the role of 'medium' between the living and the dead who watched over the descendants, were associated with the rites of the bwete , comparable to those of the Fang. They are sometimes bifaces, the mbulu-viti , symbolizing ...


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250.00

Large cut Kuba Lele cephalomorph
objet vendu
African art > Usual african items > Coupe Cuba

Among the prestigious objects, this palm wine cup whose handles are made up of the braids of the hairstyle of the carved effigy also has an anthropomorphic posterior handle. The flared base of the object is formed from the neck. The sculpted face has similarities with the features of large royal masks, Kuba. Checkerboard and diamond engravings complete the ornamentation. Patine mate abrasée.br-The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the high ranks of their society. Several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined motifs, including cups, drinking horns and cups. The Lele are established to the west of the Kuba kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers.The intercultural exchanges between the Bushoongs of Kuba ...

anthropomorphic Cuba Lele cup
African art > Usual african items > Cuba cup

Among the prestigious objects held by members of the kuba royal family, this type of palm wine cup with a handle is built on a base of legs. The sculpture features the hairstyle in the shape of ram horns on either side of the face, which also refers to the fact that only the nyim (king) and his entourage could own sheep. The face recalls the morphology of the great royal Kuba masks. Checkerboard engravings complete the ornamentation. Dark satin patina.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestigious objects created for members of the high ranks of their society. Several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined motifs, including cuts, drinking horns and cups. The Lele s established in the west of the Kuba Kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele ...


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180.00

Bamileke Ceremonial Stool / Bamum "Kuo koko"
African art > African Chair > Bamileke Seat

In African art, the Bamiléké demonstrate their know-how through the use of multicolored beads.
This monoxyle seat, named r-mfo ch the Bamum, is made up of a caryatidic zoomorphic base and figure supporting the seating plateau. The leopard forms a recurring motif because it symbolizes royal qualities. Moreover, once killed, the feline's skins and teeth returned to the king. These prestige attributes played a role in rituals. A basic structure is carved in wood and then covered, above a canvas of rabane, with a lattice of imported pearls and curies, an ancient currency associated with wealth.

Situated in the border region of Nigeria, the northwestern province of Cameroon , the Grassland is made up of several ethnic groups: Tikar, Anyang, Widekum, Chamba, Bamoun, or Bamum ...

Bangubangu scepter summit
African art > Usual african items > Bangubangu emblem

This scepter summit is made up of different sections between which a double janiform figure is associated with the ancestors. The lines recall the art Of Hemba, Kusu and Buyu. The faces are framed by a tiara and a thin beard collar forming raised bars. Brown patina, satin, rubbed with kaolin.
In the east of the R.D.C. Among the Bangubangu of Luba-Hemba origin, who were decimated by slavery, disease, armed conflict, and under the influence of Islam, statuary is rare. The land belongs to the different clans of their society. The main clan is the Bena Bago , under the aegis of an oversized chief named Mulohwe assisted by dignitaries. Each of the clans is led by a chief Sultani. The secret society, Muyi has carved objects, including emblematic sceptres belonging to judges or the society ...


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220.00





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