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African art - Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale:

African everyday objects have become true works of art for Westerners. Used for ritual, ceremonial or purely everyday purposes on the African continent. They have never known the European artistic attraction, within the African population.


Ngulu Ngombe execution knife
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Ngombe knife

"Execution" knives are also parade weapons, such as this ngulu with a wooden handle partially wrapped with copper wire. In northwestern Zaire, south of the Ubangi,live the 6000 Moswea-Ngombe of Bantu language. Their neighbors are the Ngbandi and the Ngbaka and various banda groups. They knew no god but expected favors from their ancestors, among them health and prosperity. Their throwing knives used for hunting were used as currency.
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Mossi axe
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Mossi axe

Cephalomorphic sculpted ax, depicting a warrior's helmet from which springs a blade. Traditional patterns, linear and geometric, are engraved on the surface. Marks of use and abrasions.
Upper Volta, Burkina Faso since independence, is made up of the descendants of the invaders, riders from Ghana in the 15th century, named Nakomse , and Tengabibisi , descendants of the natives. Political power is in the hands of the Nakomsé, who assert their power through statues, while priests and religious leaders come from the Tengabisi, who use masks during their ceremonies. Animists, the Mossi worship a creator god named Wendé . Each individual would be endowed with a soul, sigha , linked to a totemic animal.


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350.00

Luba neck rest
African art > Head rest > Luba neck rest

The Luba are renowned for their statuary and in particular their neckrests and stools made of a caryatid figure. The figures adorning this headrest, which is meant to preserve the complex headdress of its owner, refer to Luba royalty. But the neck rests were also used to support the heads of the deceased, and sometimes, according to Albert Maesen, buried in their place. Brown satin patina, light pigment residue. The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River, hence the name (Baluba, which means "the Lubas"). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of Ilunga Kalala, who had the old king Kongolo, who has since been venerated in the form of a python, die. In the ...


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150.00

Ewe voodoo basket
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Ewe voodoo basket

Ex collection Belgian African art.

The basket has in its center a small altar for Mami Wata who is an ewe deity, mother goddess of the waters. We can find larger and more colorful representations reminiscent of mermaids in our culture. In the terracotta basket, around the central stage, a multitude of offerings are visible and libations accompany this tangle of materials and strings.

The Ewe, often confused with the Minas, are the most important ethnic group in Togo. They are also found as minorities in Ghana, Benin, Côte d'Ivoire and Nigeria.
Although little historical information is available about them, it seems that their location in their present location is the result of invasions and conflicts that erupted during the 17th century.

The Ewe ...


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245.00

Ladle spoon AmmôlaTouareg Niger
African art > Spoons, ladles > Touareg Ladle

br> Usual objects in African art.
A functional accessory for ritual ceremonies, this sculpted spoon offers a deep cone-shaped spoon surmounted by a curved handle with a flat end. Very fine streaks adorn the surface.
Scattered throughout the Saharan region of Libya, Mali, Algeria and Niger, the Tuareg (sing: Targui), or "Veiled Men", would come from Berber pastors fleeing the Arabs in Libya in the 7th century. The targui blacksmith also sculpts wood, which is a rare material, carved objects which are often repaired to prolong their use are part of the dowry.
Ref. : "Black Africa, 1" J. Anquetil.


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280.00

Baule loom pulley caliper
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Baoule loom

Aesthetics of everyday life for African art from Côte d'Ivoire. In Côte d'Ivoire, the apparently most ordinary objects had to meet aesthetic criteria. Furniture, ornaments, utensils, fabrics, are the pretext for a refined artistic expression on the part of the sculptors.
The technique of weaving cotton has spread to West Africa thanks to the movements of the Dioulas. Before colonization, textiles made from cotton fiber, the latter referred to as "white gold", also served as a currency. Prestigious adornments, woven ceremonial loincloths, sometimes in large numbers, accompanied the chiefs in their sepulcher, among the Kuba, but also among the Baoulé.
It is an anthropomorphic beam pulley stirrup whose bust takes up the motif of the bonu amuin cow mask. The figurative ...


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75.00

Big door Fang
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Door Fang

Pahouins' artistic productions in African art of Gabon Door and its frame, with a large handle, carved with friezes with faces and figures of ancestors reminiscent of the formal appearance of the reliquary heads of Byeri. These symbolic motives have the value of protection, the deceased being for the Fang peoples, to control the occult powers. Wood dowels fix the panels. The back of the door is equipped with a horizontal bar. The people known as Fang, or "Pahouins", described as conquering warriors, have invaded by successive leaps, from villages to villages, all the way between Sanaga in Cameroon and Ogooue in Gabon, between the eighteenth and the beginning of the 20th century. They never had political unity. Clan cohesion has been maintained through religious and judicial associations ...


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Edo benign bronze plate
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Benin Plate

Ex-collection French African art.
Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of kings, the Oba , was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. In African tribal art, glorifying war scenes were reproduced on narrative plates, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chefs, majestic felines, heavy bracelets, hairs and recades were produced in quantity in many workshops of smelters according to the technique of cast iron with lost wax. During the 16th century, oba Esigie commissioned the first copper alloy plates with embossed ornamentation. Many of them were cast in pairs to symmetrically decorate the pillars or walls of the palace. Olfert Dapper describes these plaques ...


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1995.00

Kongo Yombe Pfemba Flycatcher
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Yombe Stick

A maternity figure pfemba , carved in the round, forms the handle of this prestigious flycatcher. The woman seated cross-legged, named phemba or pfemba, a symbol of the mythical ancestor, is likely associated with fertility cults. The child on her lap would embody the matrilineal transmission of power. Different faces adorn the middle section of the handle, while decorative motis are printed around the lower part. Lustrous black patina. The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombe were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rituals by means of carved fetishes nkondo nkisi.
The Yombe are established on the West African coast in the southwestern Republic of the Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable ...

Yoruba Command Staff
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Yoruba Staff

Objects of prestige in African art associated with the Yoruba culture. Among the Yoruba, ritual sculptures are dedicated to the mythical gods "orisa" and supposed to attract their blessings. This stick is made up of different sections: a superposition of human figures topped by a snake and a carved motif probably associated with fertility. Among the Yoruba, the snake also symbolizes masculinity. Piece collected in Gouka, Benin. Red brown oiled patina. Missing.
Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, the Yoruba religion is indeed based on artistic sculptures with coded messages ( aroko ). They are designed by sculptors at the request of adepts, diviners and their clients. These spirits are supposed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare . The ...


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Baule loom pulley
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Baoulé chicken

Everyday aesthetics for African art in Côte d'Ivoire.
In Côte d'Ivoire, the most ordinary objects had to meet aesthetic criteria. Furniture, ornaments, utensils, fabrics, are pretext for a refined artistic expression on the part of sculptors.
The cotton weaving technique has spread to West Africa thanks to the displacements of the Dioulas. Prior to colonization, cotton-fibre textiles, the latter being referred to as " white gold", were also used as bargaining chips. The making of prestigious, ceremonial adornments was intended to accompany, sometimes in large numbers, the chefs in their graves. This was the case for example in the Kuba, but also in the Baoulé.
This smooth pulley stirrup adorned with a male figure obeys the stylistic conventions of Baoulé statues. The ...


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Gouro, Guro, Kono loom pulley
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Gouro Pulley

Aesthetics of everyday life for African art from the Ivory Coast. The angular stirrup, decorated with geometric motifs, is surmounted by a character holding his long beard. The protruding joints, rendered in a very realistic manner, are masterfully carved.
The figurative motifs of these pulleys are very diverse: cephalomorphic or zoomorphic among the Baule and Gouro, while the Senufo frequently decorated them with hornbill figures. Dark brown granular patina.
In Ivory Coast, the most ordinary objects had to meet aesthetic criteria. Furniture, ornaments, utensils, fabrics, are a pretext for refined artistic expression on the part of sculptors. The technique of cotton weaving spread to West Africa thanks to the movements of the Dioulas. Before colonization, ...


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Kongo Nkangi Kiditu Crucifix
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Crucifix Kongo

Collection traditional African art French.
Among Kongo chiefs in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the crucifix stood among chieftain regalia as a symbol of power the authority. A ceremony at the investiture of the chief required the future ruler to receive from the hands of a dignitary, in a codified ritual, a nkangi kiditu . This insignia of power, inspired by ancient Christian crucifixes imported by the Portuguese in the 16th century, could also have had a therapeutic function, and, in addition to various uses, was brandished at funeral ceremonies during which the object was subjected to libations of oil or palm wine. Height on base: 29 cm.
The cross would not be a motif specific to the ...


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Tabwa ceremonial axe
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Tabwa Axe

A prestigious object displayed during ceremonies and ritual dances, this weapon has an anthropomorphic handle depicting an ancestor with braids drawn towards the nape of the neck. Similar to the Luba, whose effigy bears abdominal scarification marks, the Tabwa and the populations that surround them generally depict the body in its entirety. Smooth mahogany red patina. The Tabwa are an ethnic group present in the southeast of the DRC. Simple farmers with no centralized power, they federated around tribal chiefs after coming under the influence of the Luba. It is mainly during this period that their artistic movement was expressed through statues and masks. The Tabwa practiced ancestor worship and dedicated some of their statues to them. Animists, their beliefs are ...


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Ngombe execution knife
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Ngombe knife

Among African weapons, execution knives are also parade weapons, such as this ngulu with a handle extended with copper ribbons. The blade bears fine decorative incisions in its center.
In northwestern Zaire, south of the Ubangi,live the 6000 Moswea-Ngombe of Bantu language. Their neighbors are the Ngbandi and the Ngbaka and various banda groups. They knew no god but expected favors from their ancestors, among them health and prosperity. Their throwing knives used for hunting were used as currency.  For info


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Kwéré calabash container
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kwéré calabash

The round carved cap of this vessel shows a Kwere woman wearing a double sagittal crest. The eyes are inlaid with pearls, giving a piercing look. The attitude refers to fertility. Velvety patina.
The Zaramo and the tribes that surround them, such as the Kwere, have designed dolls that are generally associated with fertility, but to which other virtues are attributed. Its primary role is played during the period of seclusion of the young Zaramo initiate. The novice will behave towards the object as she would towards a child, and will dance with it during the closing ceremonies of the initiation. In the event that the young woman does not conceive, she will adopt the "child. Among the Zaramo and Kwere, this carved motif is repeated at the top of canes, decorates ritual objects ...


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Bakota Reliquary Keeper
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African art > Reliquaries, statues > Kota Reliquary

Ex-collection French African art.
The Kota of the Sebe Valley, located in Gabon but also in Congo, produced this type of sculpture that played the role of "medium" between the living and the dead and continued to watch over their descendants. They are sometimes bifaces, mbulu-viti , symbolizing the masculine and feminine aspect.
This type of coin was used in the preservation of mortuary remains of high-lineage ancestors in baskets topped with very specific sculptures, which played the role of guardians of the relics named ngulu. In the exclusive presence of insiders, the clan's major decisions were made during ceremonies during which the reliquaries were taken out and used. In order to reactivate the magic charge, the initiates rubbed the relic with sand. In the Kota, these ...


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Somba Bénin Trompe
African art > Tam Tam, Djembe, musical instruments > Somba Flute

Among African aerophones, this Somba flute from Benin has sections sheathed in leather, most of it swaddled in cotton thread. Pastoral peoples possessed this type of instrument, one of whose functions, in addition to entertainment, was to signal a presence alongside the herd. Abraded patina of use.
The Somba form a heterogeneous group living in the Atacora range in northwest Benin and Togo. They are divided into different subgroups, in Benin they are the Bètiabè, the Batammariba and the Bèsorbè and the Tamberma in Togo.


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620.00

Chokwé Hunting Whistle
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Chokwé Whistle

Jan Putteneers African Art Collection.

Usual object but also ceremonial, he accompanied the Chokwe who wore it as a pendant, which helped polish their surface. The sculpted head could represent a head wearing the crown chipangula. Two small side holes have been fitted out for sound.
Played together, whistles, produced in large numbers, were used both during dances and hunting to call dogs but also to war. Thanks to the few sounds they made, information was exchanged from one place to another.
The Chokwé have become known in the Western world for their works of art, which are highly appreciated in the general context of African art.
The sculpted face of the founding hero Tshibinda Ilunga is recognized on this piece. This central character has a very special ...


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Double jarre Mangbetu
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Vases Mangbetu

Named 'generous' in African art, these pottery are intended to collect palm wine. These jars with globular bodies, equipped with handles, have cephalomorphic gullies arranged face to face. The faces are marked by subtle differences suggesting a couple. Oiled patina, black and smooth, abrasions.
asebli in the forest in northeastern Zaire, the Mangbetu kingdom has expressed itself through architectural works that impressed European visitors in the 19th century. Their furniture, weapons, adornments and statuary were imbued with a rare aesthetic quality. The Mangbetu story was based on the refinement of his court but also on cannibalistic customs. King Mangbetu Munza was so dubbed The cannibal king. The body lines on the characters, like those of the face, include the traditional ...


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240.00

Mangbetu headrest with caryatids
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African art > Head rest > Mangbetu headrest

A figure of a kneeling couple supports the tray of this piece of mangbetu furniture. The body tracings refer to the ceremonial paintings of the clan. The high hairstyle is characteristic of the Mangbetu aristocracy: from an early age, children had their skulls compressed by means of raffia ties. Later, the Mangbetu knitted their hair on strands of wicker and applied a band on the forehead to extract the hair and produce this particular headdress that accentuates the elongation of the head. aesthetic refinement of the Mangbetu, and the emphasis placed on fertility . The elders name beli these figures of ancestors stored out of sight and comparable to those belonging to their secret society nebeli . Established in the forest in northeastern Zaire, the Mangbetu kingdom expressed ...





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