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African art - Usual items:

African everyday objects have become true works of art for Westerners. Used for ritual, ceremonial or purely everyday purposes on the African continent. They have never known the European artistic attraction, within the African population.


Kuba cup
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kuba cup

Among the prestigious objects, this palm wine cup with its stylized handles. The sculpted face recalls the features of the great royal Kuba masks. Glossy surface inlaid with kaolin residues. Cracks of desiccation.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for the high ranks of their society. Indeed, several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined designs, including cups, drinking horns and goblets. The Lele settled in the western part of the Kuba kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers. Intercultural exchanges between the Bushoong of the Kuba territory and the Lele made the attribution of certain objects delicate, as both groups use the same iconography, composed of faces with elaborate hairstyles and ...


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95.00

Comb Kwere
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Comb Kwere

French African art collection.
Prestigious African comb with a traditional doll motif. Light brown satin smooth patina. The Zaramo and the tribes around them designed dolls generally associated with fertility, but to which other virtues would be attributed. Its primary role is played during the period of confinement of the young initiate Zaramo. The novice will behave towards the object as with a child, and will dance with it during the closing ceremonies of the initiation. In case the young woman does not conceive, she will adopt the "child". Among the Zaramo, this carved motif is repeated on the top of canes, decorates ritual objects, such as combs, hairpins, and even appears on burial posts.


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95.00

Bamana Lock
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Bamana Lock

African art among the Bambara.
This anthropomorphic Bambara bolt is made up of two pieces arranged in a cross: the vertical chest and the horizontal crossbar with a hollow for the key. The crosspiece is reinforced by a sliding metal part in its lower part. The locks, mainly held by women and symbolizing the union of two people, can be offered to them by their husbands on various occasions, such as a birth or the woman moving in with her husband. These are personal assets transferable to daughters and daughters-in-law. The surface has a dry, grainy texture. On base: 65 cm.
The Bambara, also known as "Bamana" or "unbelievers" according to Muslims, are established in central and southern Mali. They are part of the large Mande group, alongside the Soninke and Malinke. Their ...


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280.00

Bambara lock
African art > Dogon locks, Bambara locks > Bambara lock

Bambara Targette consists of two nested parts, the trunk, vertical, and the crossbar, horizontal. Locks, usually belonging to women and symbolizing the union of two people, can be offered to them by their husbands on the occasion of a birth or to celebrate the installation of the woman at her husband. It is therefore personal property transferable to girls and daughters-in-law.
Beautiful oiled patina, glossy, abrasion wear.
The Bambara, "Bamana," or "unbelievers," as the Muslims have named them, belong to the great Mande group, along with the Soninke and Malinke, who were established in central and southern Mali.


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180.00

Yombe Box
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Yombe Box

African sculpture depicting a woman sitting cross-legged. She embodies the ancestor associated with fertility cults. It forms the lid of a small box.
A subgroup of the Kongo ethnic group, the Yombe, established on the west African coast, in the southwest of the Republic of Congo and in Angola, are characterized by a statuary in which various maternity figures abound. The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombé were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rites by means of sculpted nkondo nkisi fetishes.

Matte brown patina.

Ref. : “Maternity in black African art” Massa; “Tribal Art of Black Africa” Bacquart.


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180.00

Luba sword
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Luba sword

This type of ceremonial weapon also served as currency among many Central African groups. The sculpted motif here is janiform, extended by a handle bearing the imprint of nails, then by a blade with a bulging center. Grainy oxidized patina, abraded oiled patina on the handle.
In Africa, before the colonial period, payments were never made in coins. Transactions were made using cowries, pearls, cattle, kola nuts, but also metals, especially iron. These primitive currencies were used during commercial and social exchanges, for dowries in particular, but could also constitute objects of parade or throwing weapons. In Sierra Leone, goods were valued against iron bars called barriferri. The king generally controlled the production or routing of the kingdom's currency. The variety of ...


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180.00

Mbole currency
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Mbole currency

The blade of the sword, weapon of prestige then currency of transaction, carries in its center of weak traces of hammered reasons. The contours are irregular, the patina oxidized rusty orange.
In Africa, before the colonial period, payments were never made in coins. Transactions were made by means of cowrie shells, pearls, cattle, kola nuts, but also metals, especially iron. These primitive currencies were used for commercial and social exchanges, particularly for dowries, but could also be used as parade objects or throwing weapons. In Sierra Leone, goods were valued in relation to iron bars called barriferri. The king usually controlled the production or delivery of the kingdom's currency. The variety of these metal forms is wide, and they sometimes take the form of ...


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180.00

Songye axe
African art > Coins in bronze, black iron and other materials > Songye axe

African weapons and currencies used to assert the prestige of local chiefs.
Songye ceremonial ax whose blade is carried by a handle decorated with sculpted figures, including a double face repeating the Songye typology. Sections are covered with sheets of metal, fragments of which are chipped.
Height on base: 56 cm. Originally from Shaba in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Songye are related to the Luba, with whom they share common ancestors.


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350.00

Kongo Box
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kongo Box

African statuette enclosing the abdominal cavity into which magical ingredients were introduced. The subject forms the lid of a small box. Matte brown patina, drying crack..
A clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the west African coast, in the southwest of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternity wards. The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, led by king ntotela . Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary with codified gestures in relation to their vision of the world.

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Kuba Jar
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba Jar

Among the prestigious objects of the Kuba groups, this beer container with a handle engraved with geometric patterns. The walls and bottom are thick. Satin black patina. Minor cracks.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the high ranks of their society. Several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined designs including cups, drinking horns and goblets. The Lele are established in the west of the Kuba kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers. Intercultural exchanges between the Bushoong of Kuba territory and the Lele have made the attribution of certain objects difficult, because the two groups use the same iconography, composed of faces with elaborate hairstyles and geometric decorative motifs.


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120.00

Kongo Pulley
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kongo Pulley

Decorative subject carved in the round depicting an ancestor of the clan. The eyes are inlaid with horn. Satin orange-brown patina.
Established on the plateaus of the People's Republic of Congo ex.Brazzaville, and not to be confused with the Bembé group north of Lake Tanganinyika, the small Babembé group, Béembé, was influenced by Téké rites and culture, but especially by that of the Kongo. Installed in the current Republic of Congo, the Béembé originally formed the kingdom of Kongo, with the Vili, Yombé, Bwendé and Woyo. They were under the supervision of the ntotela king elected by the governors. The trade in ivory, copper and slaves were the main resources of this group, which was little known until colonization. The village manager, nga-bula, was responsible for ...


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180.00

Chamba Currency
African art > Coins in bronze, black iron and other materials > Chamba Currency

Primitive African currencies take a wide variety of forms, and these sometimes take on, in traditional African art, the appearance of particularly aesthetic tribal sculptures. Some hoe-type pieces were used in the 1950s in Nigeria to acquire a slave or a wife. It was necessary to collect around forty for a slave, and at the time they constituted part of the dowry for most Bantu tribes.
Height on base: 42 cm.
In Africa, before the colonial period, payments were never made in coins. Transactions were made using cowrie shells, pearls, cattle, kola nuts, but also metals, including iron in particular. These primitive currencies were used during commercial and social exchanges, for dowries in particular, but could also constitute objects of display or throwing weapons. In Sierra ...


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240.00

Kongo Cross
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Kongo Cross

Among the Kongo chiefs at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century, the crucifix served, among the chieftain regalia, as a symbol of power of authority. A ceremony during the inauguration of the chief required that the future leader receive from the hands of a dignitary, during a codified ritual, a nkangi kiditu. This badge of power, inspired by ancient Christian crucifixes imported by the Portuguese in the 16th century, could also have a therapeutic function, and, in addition to various uses, be brandished during funeral ceremonies during which the object was subjected to libations. palm oil or wine.
Height on base: 28 cm.
The cross would not be a motif specific to the Christian world, the ...


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280.00

Kongo Crucifix
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kongo Crucifix

Ex-French African art collection.
Carved wooden cross, named "nkangi kiditu". Among the Kongo chiefs at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, the crucifix took the place, among the chiefly regalia, of a symbol of power and authority. A ceremony during the investiture of the chief required that the future ruler receive from the hands of a dignitary, during a codified ritual, a nkangi kiditu. This badge of power, inspired by ancient Christian crucifixes imported by the Portuguese in the 16th century, could also have a therapeutic function, and, in addition to various uses, be brandished during funeral ceremonies during which the object was subjected to libations. palm oil or palm wine. The cross is not a motif specific to the Christian world, the Kongo consider ...


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160.00

Salampasu Knife
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Salampasu Knife

Exceptional and old Salampasu knife with a carved motif of a head whose neck extends to a fingered foot. Leather straps connect the blade to its handle. Beautiful traces of oxidation. Erosions and desiccation cracks. Living by hunting and agriculture, a warrior people, the Salampasu form a tribe of the Lulua group and are settled between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Angola, east of the Kasai River. They are surrounded to the west and south by the Tschokwe and the Lunda, and to the north and east by the Kete and the Lwalwa. A hierarchy of masks, simple kasangu wooden masks and mukinka copper-covered masks, was associated with mungongo (pl. bangongo) warrior society. Masks are used during initiations as well as during meetings of different social classes.


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240.00

Kusu Oracle
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kusu Oracle

Instrument of divination used by the diviner during rituals of divination. Integrating the category of nkisi, nkishi objects, it is supposed to be endowed with a secret power, a receptacle of spiritual energy.
The Kusu established on the left bank of the Lualaba have borrowed the artistic traditions of the Luba and the Hemba and have a caste system similar to that Luba. In this region, between the Bembe, Boyo, Hemba, Songye and Tetela, ritual objects were subject to exchanges and stylistic influences. Among the Luba, Songye and Hemba, this type of object linked to kashekeshekeest divination is called katatora and lubuko. According to François Neyt, the object was carved from wood (kibekwasa) with magical properties. During the interview, the ring was grabbed by the diviner ...


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240.00

Punu carquois
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Punu carquois

Saverio Collection of African Art.
This Punu archery object has a base consisting of two characters tied back to back. The latter feature tribal checkerboard scarifications, mabinda, on the forehead and abdomen, and the hulled hairstyles characteristic of the region. The cylindrical body of the quine is wrapped in finely braided raffia and fitted with a cotton fabric conveyor belt. Natural raw patina. Punu women produce items made of baskets, baskets, baskets, pods, mats, thanks to a vine named mambe, and rushes. They are also in charge of the pottery they trade in Lumbu and Tsogo. Like men, they are grouped into initiation associations. Before any warlike confrontation, a visit to the nganga was necessary: he collected the right plants and made sacrifices to honor the protective ...


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380.00

Sundi Box
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Sundi Box

Rare figurative box describing a childbirth scene. This type of sculpture had a didactic function. Matte patina, cracking, old restoration. Presence of resin inside. The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, led by King Ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary and prestigious objects equipped with codified gestures in relation to their vision of the world. A clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the west African coast, in the southwest of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. The Yombe decorated their textiles, mats and loincloths, with diamonds in relation to proverbs ...


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240.00

Baule Chair
African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Baule Chair

Seat named ketekle devolved to notables, but accompanying, among the Wé, the dance of young girls during celebrations associated with initiations. The accessory marks the approval of the family ancestor who owned this prestigious object. Very nice patina of use, ocher brown, velvety. Desication cracks, small accidents.


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180.00

Kuba Cup
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba Cup

Like their Kuba neighbours, the Lele have a wide variety of ceremonial sculptures, such as this cup with many carefully engraved details, used during divination rites, pacts and ritual ceremonies. Satin black patina, minor chips.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige items created for members of the high ranks of their society. Several Kuba groups indeed produced anthropomorphic objects with refined motifs including cups, drinking horns and goblets. The Lele are established in the west of the Kuba kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers. The intercultural exchanges between the Bushoong of the Kuba territory and the Lele have made the attribution of certain objects difficult, because the two groups use the same iconography, composed of faces with ...


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120.00

Leka mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Leka mask

Initiation mask of the Lega or the Leka, whose society, the Bukota, welcoming both men and women, is the equivalent of the Bwami association of the Lega. A braided raffia cord highlights the oval shape of the mask, whose very close eyes surmount a nose crossed by a groove, and asymmetrical nostrils. The wide mouth, from the corners of which rise broken lines, is split horizontally. Star patterns complement the tribal scars.<

The Leka sculptures, subject to the influence of the neighboring Mbole, Lega and Binja, played a role during initiation, funeral or circumcision ceremonies, and were then placed on the tomb of high-ranking initiates. Each of these figures had a name and a meaning for educational purposes, following the example of lega traditions. Kaolin patina, rings ...


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150.00





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