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African art - Bronze:

In African art, one finds a multitude of bronze objects made in the purest animist tradition by the village blacksmiths. Nigeria, thanks to the Benin and Ife kingdoms, was a major producer of bronze objects. The statues, heads and everyday objects made of bronze are of superb workmanship thanks to the use of the lost wax process which consists of creating a massive model in clay. This is covered with a layer of wax and metal rods are added. Then we cover the whole with refractory clay leaving a hole in the upper part. When it is dry, it is heated, which melts the wax inside, and then the bronze is poured in. Finally there is only to break the clay inside to recover the bronze object.


Bembe Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bembe Bronze

Belgian African art collection.
African statuette embodying an ancestor. The subject, with a protective aim, bears the keloid patterns testifying to the successive stages of the initiation to which he was subjected. Khaki patina rubbed with pink ocher for a ritual purpose.
Established on the plateaus of the People's Republic of Congo ex.Brazzaville, and not to be confused with the Bembe group of northern Lake Tanganinyika, the small Bwende group was influenced by Téké rites and culture, but especially by that of the Kongo. The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembe, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by king ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same ...


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250.00

Tikar Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Tikar Bronze

French collection of African art.

Symbolizing the joyful exuberance of Tikar, this bronze sculpture mixing various subjects in ever more surprising postures. Black patina, erosions.
The chiefs of the Cameroonian Grasslands, the Fon, reputed to hold treasures of works of art, including bracelets, necklaces, statues, bells, valued the founders and sculptors in the service of the kingdom. These productions, without which the chef lost his prestige, aimed to magnify the role of the fon. The technique used was lost wax casting, the decorations varying according to the status of the recipient to whom the king wished to grant a reward. The Bamoun sometimes bought works from the Tikar, who were also gifted in metalworking. From 1920 the founders no longer worked exclusively for ...


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480.00

Memorial head Benin
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Memorial head Benin

Benin’s African art is described as a court art closely associated with the king, or Oba. The tradition of bronze objects of the Benin kingdom, heads, statues, carved ivory tusks, bells and sticks, dates back to the 14th century. They were reserved for the exclusive use of the inhabitants of the royal palace and, most often, placed on altars consecrated by each new Oba. This late sculpture depicts a queen mother of Benin named Iyoba, whose neck wore multiple necklaces of coral beads. Black patina, green oxidations. . After the birth of the future king, the queen was "removed" from power and could no longer beget. But at the end of the 15th century the Oba Esigie refused to conform to this practice and wanted to attribute the city of Uselu to his mother. She also received a palace ...


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650.00

 Dogon pendant
African art > Jewelry, ornament > Dogon pendant

African sculpture of bronze alloy type Dogon, African statuette Dogon depicting a seated ancestor. Khaki patina with golden highlights.

The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, esotericism, myths and legends. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 people living south-west of the Niger Loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest of Ouahigouya). The remains of old steel sites on the Bandiagara plateau, dating from the 15th century, confirm the activity of blacksmiths. The latter form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim They now produce weapons, tools,and also work wood. "Masters of fire", they are also supposed to heal burns (Huib Blom).


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95.00

Dogon bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon bronze

Small anecdotal statuette describing a character carrying an ax and a bundle of wood. This statuette with many details is coated with a black patina encrusted with clear deposits.
Dogon blacksmiths form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim. They now produce weapons, tools, and also work with wood. "Masters of fire" associated in the Dogon cosmogony with the primordial beings "Nommo" created by the god Ama, they are also supposed to heal burns. Small metal objects, made using the lost-wax technique, were widespread in the Inner Niger Delta region, with copper reaching it through trans-Saharan trade. Excavations on the Bandiagara plateau have in fact brought to light vestiges of iron and steel sites prior to the 15th century, the date of the arrival of the Dogon. The ...


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99.00

Kota brass
African art > Coins in bronze, black iron and other materials > Kota brass

The Kota inhabit the eastern part of Gabon, which is rich in iron ore. The blacksmith, also a wood carver, made tools for agricultural work as well as ritual weapons and reliquary figures. As for the brass ornaments, when they were too voluminous to be worn, they were worth money and served as a wedding dowry. Oxidized granular patina.


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380.00

Benin Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Benin Bronze

Palatial tribal art of the Benin type.
Bronze miniature whose motifs represent the eyespots of the coat.
The killing of the king of animals associated with legends, the leopard, was the privilege of the chief, the Oba. The feline could then serve as an offering for the cult of the chief's head. Sometimes tamed by various royal guilds, he accompanied the chief on his travels. The Oba, called "child of the household leopard", could also offer the teeth or skin to commanders whose loyalty was evident. The rich Benin iconography is therefore full of references to this animal.
Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. Warlike scenes were ...


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95.00

Sao Bronze
African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Sao Bronze

Miniature in bronze alloy depicting a rider on his mount, the latter representing an exceptional attribute of prestige in the arid regions of the Sahel. This talisman constitutes, for the Sao, a protection against madness. The rider symbolizes the genius who possesses the madman, the horse representing the victim.
Between the 12th and 14th centuries, the Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established on hills in the border regions of Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria, in order to repel invaders. Subjected to successive attacks from their neighbors in Kanem and then to hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the North-West of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to the Kotokos. The Kotoko still attribute today to the copper ...


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40.00

Dogon Rider
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon Rider

Collection ofAfrican artBelgian.
This African statuette represents a horsewoman holding a spear. Its brown patina has residual ocher encrustations.
The Dogon of Mali are known for their frequent representations of horsemen, which echo their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. According to these stories, one of the Nommos, ancestors of men, was resurrected by the creator god Amma and descended to earth carried by an ark transformed into a horse. Furthermore, during his enthronement, the highest religious authority of the Dogon people, the religious leader called Hogon, paraded on his mount, not having to set foot on the ground according to custom. In the region of the Sangha cliffs, where access on horseback is impossible, the priests wore it, evoking the ...


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350.00

Vere Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Vere Bronze

Ex-collection of African art from a Parisian gallery owner whose identity will be communicated to the buyer.
Pair of African bronzes depicting a couple with objects, in a dynamic posture. One of the male subject's feet is placed on that of his partner, as if to curb the momentum of the second subject. The bodies are streaked with scarifications. Irregular black patina, chips, residual verdigris pigments.
The Vere, Verre , Were, Duru-Verre, or even Dii, live in the northeast of Nigeria, in the state of Adamawa (former Gongola), and in the north of Cameroon. This very small population lives in circular huts grouped into fortified villages.
The Vere statuettes, whose function remains unknown, are rare, and present analogies with the works produced by the Mumuye, ...


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380.00

Bronze Nigeria
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Bronze Nigeria

Extract from a Belgian African tribal art collection of 17 pieces representing different subjects.

This object comes from northeastern Nigeria near Lake Chad, around Maiduguri, in the state of Borno, which is currently relatively inaccessible because it is controlled by armed Islamist groups. The dominant language is Kanuri.
It is a rare piece, associated with protective spirits, which was buried in the ground in order to preserve crops from animals or thieves. The Damosaka families, a very little known minority ethnic group in the region, had this type of ritual object. We have no information about them. This is a male figure whose hands meet in front of the bust. Very thick grainy patina of verdigris oxidation. Stone-like clumps remain on the coin.


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780.00

Kongo Cross
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Kongo Cross

Among the Kongo chiefs at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century, the crucifix served, among the chieftain regalia, as a symbol of power of authority. A ceremony during the inauguration of the chief required that the future leader receive from the hands of a dignitary, during a codified ritual, a nkangi kiditu. This badge of power, inspired by ancient Christian crucifixes imported by the Portuguese in the 16th century, could also have a therapeutic function, and, in addition to various uses, be brandished during funeral ceremonies during which the object was subjected to libations. palm oil or wine.
Height on base: 28 cm.
The cross would not be a motif specific to the Christian world, the ...


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280.00

Ndegese Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Ndegese Bronze

Kneeling subject promoting lineage. The flared hairstyle is that of the Totshi chiefs belonging to the ikoho association and evokes particular proverbs. It symbolizes respect, intelligence and maturity. The patterns engraved in relief refer to the scarifications which socially and aesthetically distinguished individuals. Golden patina. A people from Central Africa established in Kasai, neighboring the Kuba, the Ndengese form one of the clans descended from a common Mongo ancestor, some of them being originally of the Upper Nile. They produced primitive art statues with absent or truncated lower limbs, covered with graphic symbols, symbolizing the prestige of the leader. Ref.: “Treasures of Africa” Tervuren Museum.


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340.00

Bénin Statue
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bénin Statue

Late sculpture of the Edo type, in bronze alloy. It features a seated dignitary, which could represent the Oba Ewuakpe who was forced to wear a European helmet after being deprived of his prerogatives because of a rebellion. Black abraded patina.
Before the destruction of the palace of the kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. War scenes were reproduced on narrative plaques, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, heavy bracelets, anklets and recades were produced in quantity in many foundry workshops using the lost wax casting technique. The numerous brass heads and statues created by the artists of Benin were reserved for the ...


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190.00

Sao Bronze
African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Sao Bronze

In African art, works inspired by Sao Sokoto are mainly influenced by the equestrian world.
Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen, generally made of bronze, are melted and worn as talismans, patinated and lustrous by friction. They are considered above all as a remedy to fight against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genius who possesses him is symbolized by the rider.
Subjected to successive attacks from their neighbors in Kanem then to hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the North-West of Cameroon where they interbred with the natives thus giving birth to the Kotoko. More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now disappeared. They were ...


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70.00

Sao Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao Bronze

Used as an amulet credited with apotropaic virtues, this small bronze sculpture constitutes, for the Sao, a talisman worn permanently, supposed to protect them from madness. The genius who possesses the madman is represented by the rider, the horse representing the victim. This horseman wearing a cheche rides an equine which was a rare attribute of prestige in these regions of the Sahel.
The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the 12th and 14th centuries in a geographical area extending over the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. They established themselves on hills, which enabled them to repel invaders. Subjected to successive attacks from their neighbors in Kanem and then to hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle ...


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40.00

Tikar Bell
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Tikar Bell

The chiefs of the Cameroonian Grasslands, the Fon, reputed to hold treasures of works of art, bracelets, necklaces, statues, bells, valued the founders and sculptors in the service of the kingdom. These productions, without which the chef lost his prestige, aimed to magnify the role of the fon. The technique used was lost wax casting, the decorations varying according to the status of the recipient to whom the king wished to grant a reward. The Bamoun sometimes bought works from the Tikar, who were also gifted in metalworking. From 1920 the founders no longer worked exclusively for the court. Located in the border region of Nigeria, the North-West province of Cameroon, Grassland  is made up of several ethnic groups: Tikar, Anyang, Widekum, Chamba, Bamoun and Bamileke. Several centralized ...


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450.00

African bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > African bronze

Subject depicting a dwarf, or "madman", which appeared in the 15th century in the king's entourage, and were intended not only for diversion, but also for surveillance. Occult gifts were also attributed to them. According to Fagg, these figures were also acrobats and illusionists. This type of bronze sculpture must have adorned the altars of the ancestors.
Brown patina. In African art, Benin art is described as court art because it is closely associated with the king, or Oba.

Before the destruction of the palace of the kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple codified works celebrating their power. Warlike scenes glorifying them were reproduced on narrative plaques, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous ...


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390.00

Dogon Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon Bronze

Crew made up of mythical subjects associated with the "nommos", their boat taking the shape of a crocodile. This imaginary world, taken from the legends of Dogon creation, inspires the work of Dogon artisans. Gray-green patina.
Dogon blacksmiths form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim. Today they produce weapons, tools, and also work wood. “Masters of fire” associated in Dogon cosmogony with the primordial beings “Nommo” created by the god Ama, they are also supposed to treat burns. Small metal objects, made using the lost wax technique, were widespread in the Inner Niger Delta region, with copper arriving there through trans-Saharan trade. Excavations on the Bandiagara plateau have in fact uncovered remains of iron and steel sites dating from before the 15th ...


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250.00

Benin Plate
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Benin Plate

Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. In African tribal art, warlike scenes glorifying them were reproduced on narrative plaques, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, majestic felines, heavy bracelets, anklets and recades were produced in quantity in numerous foundry workshops using the lost wax casting technique. During the 16th century, Oba Esigie commissioned the first copper alloy plaques with relief ornamentation to decorate the palace.
This Benin type lost wax bronze depicts the king and his guard. Brown patina, partial verdigris oxidation.


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490.00

Yoruba Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Yoruba Bronze

Figurative bronze representing the Oni, king of Ifé cradle city of the Yoruba, wearing a very detailed crown. Nowadays the King of Ifé wears a similar function badge, formed of a braided vertical segment ending in a pointed bulge. Such a head was attached to the top of a wooden effigy, dressed to represent the deceased king at the funeral, then buried after the ceremony in a sanctuary near the palace. Smooth texture, golden copper patina. The city of Ifé in Nigeria was in the 15th century the center of a powerful state in the forests west of the Niger delta. Bronze work was a prerogative of the "oni" king, using the lost wax technique. These prestigious objects embodying the sovereigns were placed on the royal altars for ceremonial use. It would be a craftsman from Ilé-Ifé who would ...


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490.00





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