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African art - Bronze:

In African art, one finds a multitude of bronze objects made in the purest animist tradition by the village blacksmiths. Nigeria, thanks to the Benin and Ife kingdoms, was a major producer of bronze objects. The statues, heads and everyday objects made of bronze are of superb workmanship thanks to the use of the lost wax process which consists of creating a massive model in clay. This is covered with a layer of wax and metal rods are added. Then we cover the whole with refractory clay leaving a hole in the upper part. When it is dry, it is heated, which melts the wax inside, and then the bronze is poured in. Finally there is only to break the clay inside to recover the bronze object.


Benin Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Benin Bronze

Benign plaque, depicting the Oba flanked by armed warriors. Verdigris patina revealing the metal locally.
Before the destruction of the palace of the kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. In African tribal art, war scenes glorifying them were reproduced on narrative plaques, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, majestic felines, heavy bracelets, anklets and recades were produced in quantity in numerous foundry workshops using the lost wax casting technique. During the 16th century, the Oba Esigie commissioned the first copper alloy plates with relief ornamentation. Many of them were cast in pairs in order to symmetrically ...


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350.00

Bronze Benin
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze Benin

Subject whose morphology refers to the dwarves of the king's entourage. Dwarfs made their appearance at the Benin court in the 15th century, not only for diversion, but also for surveillance. Occult gifts were indeed attributed to them. According to Fagg, these characters were also acrobats and illusionists. Their bronze figures were to adorn the altars of the ancestors. Abraded brown patina. In African art, the art of Benin is described as court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as Oba.
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Before the destruction of the palace of the kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple codified works celebrating their power. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, majestic felines, ...


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450.00

Yoruba Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Yoruba Bronze

In African tribal art, the artistic movement of which these sculptures are a part bears the name of the ancient religious capital of Nigeria, Ifè, one of the many city-states established by the Yoruba. This civilization succeeded the Nok civilization. This city-state of Ilé-Ifé, whose rise culminated from the 12th to the 15th century, had an artistic tradition of royal portraits imbued with realism, funerary effigies in bronze but also in terracotta. The parallel folds traced on the neck would evoke the folds of flesh of the prosperous notables, and the hollowed out parts which accompany it were to be used to fix the beaded veil of the king. The parallel lines of the face represent the traditional scarifications. The openings around the mouth likely represented a beard created by the ...


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650.00

Bénin Statuette
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bénin Statuette

This commemorative figure of a benign dignitary, represented seated, forms an intermediary between the spiritual world and the Edo people, and is distinguished by its ornaments in agate and coral beads. The kings of Benin being soldiers above all, he is represented with symbolic attributes illustrating power. This bronze could constitute the top of a stick. Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. War scenes glorifying them were reproduced on narrative plaques, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, majestic felines, heavy bracelets, anklets and recades were produced in quantity in many ...


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240.00

Dogon figure
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon figure

Figurine of a woman seated on heels. This statuette is made of gilded metal, the surface coated with dark oily deposits, probably for ritual purposes, has rough edges.
Dogon blacksmiths form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim. They now produce weapons, tools, and also work with wood. "Masters of fire" associated in the Dogon cosmogony with the primordial beings "Nommo" created by the god Ama, they are also supposed to heal burns. Small metal objects, made using the lost-wax technique, were widespread in the Inner Niger Delta region, with copper reaching it through trans-Saharan trade. Excavations on the Bandiagara plateau have in fact brought to light vestiges of iron and steel sites prior to the 15th century, the date of the arrival of the Dogon. The Nommo, ...


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190.00

Kongo Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Kongo Bronze

Ancestor figure, talisman of individual protection, green patina rubbed with pink ocher for a ritual purpose.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembe, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by King Ntotela. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary endowed with a codified gesture in relation to their vision of the world. The nganga, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation with the God called Nzambi through consecrated figures. Nkisis protective figures are crafted and charged by the nganga with all the necessary ingredients to combat a variety of ailments.
Source: "The Kôngo gesture" Ed. Dapper Museum; "Animal" ed. Dapper Museum; "Art and Kongos" M.L. Felix; "Kongo Power and Majesty" A. ...


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250.00

Verre bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Verre bronze

African statuette in bronze alloy representing a character whose body seems to bend under the weight of the children held around his bust. The ears are traditionally distended. The statuette also bears concentric scarifications.
Golden patina, residual dark inlays.

The Vere , Verre , Were, Duru-Verre, or Dii, live in northeastern Nigeria, in the state of Adamawa (formerly Gongola), and in northern Cameroon. This very small population lives in circular huts grouped together in fortified villages.
The Vere statuettes, whose function remains unknown, are rare, and present analogies with the works produced by the Mumuye, their close neighbors established between Nigeria and Cameroon.


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380.00

Senoufo figure
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Senoufo figure

This figurative fetish statuette is said to be a divinatory fetish object. It would be of Tussia origin, Senoufo sub-group of Burkina-Faso. Irregular greenish-grey granular patina
. The Senoufos, the name given to them by the French colonists, are mainly composed of farmers who are scattered between Mali, Côte d'Ivoire, and Burkina Faso. Councils of elders, led by an elected chief, administer Senufo villages. Governed by matrilineal traditions, they are composed of clusters of dwellings named katiolo. Each has its own Poro association that initiates young boys from the age of seven in a succession of three cycles lasting seven years . They gather in a sacred enclosure called sinzanga located near the village, among the trees. Upon the death of one of the Poro members, ...


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280.00

Lobi Ring
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Lobi Ring

Ex-Belgian African art collection.
Ankle ring acting as an amulet, the decorative patterns of which, referring to Lobi beliefs, were supposed to protect the wearer. Many rings were produced in southwestern Burkina Faso, having more currency value.
Height on base: 17 cm.
Ring only: 300 gr.
The populations of the same cultural region, grouped together under the name "lobi", form a fifth of the inhabitants of Burkina Faso. Few in Ghana, they have also settled in northern Côte d'Ivoire. It was at the end of the 18th century that the Lobi, coming from northern Ghana, settled among the indigenous Thuna and Puguli, the Dagara, the Dian, the Gan and the Birifor. The Lobi believe in a creator God named Thangba Thu, to whom they address themselves through the ...


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240.00

Ashanti Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Ashanti Bronze

The Ashanti , Asante , mastered the art of lost wax casting, the copper metal being sacred, in order to produce ritual and prestigious objects, such as < b> Kuduo made of brass which were intended, in addition to the storage of gold dust, for family and royal domestic worship. This semi-spherical mask intended for hanging is adorned with an abundance of fine decorative motifs. Dark patina with green inlays.
The Ashanti are one of the ethnic groups of Ghana (former "Gold Coast"), of the group of Akans, living in a region covered with forests. Just like other people living in the central and southern part of Ghana, they speak a language of the Twi group. This people considers the woman as the final arbiter of all decisions. Fertility and children are the most common themes ...


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280.00

Benin bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Benin bronze

This sculpture depicting a Portuguese soldier, made using the lost wax casting process, has a blaster. Richly dressed, he wears a traditional tunic, hip dagger, helmet, and anklets. Shaded gray patina. The Portuguese arrived in Benin in the 15th century, equipped with a military arsenal which aroused great interest among the kings. The power of firearms was then naturally associated with the capacity for occult defense against invisible enemies. In the 16th century, Europeans played a major role in the court of the Oba: they imported corals and glass beads there, as well as shackles, highly coveted by the king and his courtiers.
At the same time, their soldiers took part in the military campaigns of Benin, in particular against the kingdom of Idah. The character's blaster therefore ...


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780.00

Dogon bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon bronze

Dogon statuette made of bronze, representing a kneeling woman whose arms extend from her shoulders to her breasts. The linear lines of the body are associated with traditional scarification.
The Dogon blacksmiths form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim. Today they produce weapons, tools,and also work with wood. "Masters of fire" associated in Dogon cosmogony with the primordial beings "Nommo" created by the god Ama, they are also supposed to cure burns. Small metal objects, made using the lost wax technique, were widespread in the region of the interior delta of the Niger, copper reaching it thanks to the trans-Saharan trade. Excavations on the Bandiagara plateau have uncovered the remains of iron and steel sites dating back to the 15th century, the date of the ...


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250.00

Vere bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Vere bronze

This rare statuette depicting an androgynous being with strangely webbed feet and hands offers a face with prominent features, characterized by bulbous eyelids, pointed, horizontal ears, and a sagittal crest. The body is adorned with linear scarifications in checkerboard pattern originating from the neck. The latter is outlined with a torque, while a belt marks the hips and ankle rings the legs.
The Vere , Verre , Were, Duru-Verre, or Dii, live in northeastern Nigeria, in the state of Adamawa (formerly Gongola), and in northern Cameroon. This very small population lives in circular huts grouped in fortified villages.
The Vere statuettes, whose function remains unknown, are rare, and present analogies with the works produced by the Mumuye, their close neighbors ...


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380.00

Pair of altar heads Benin Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Pair of altar heads Benin Bronze

Ex English private collection of African art.

These altar heads created using the lost wax technique are very loaded with details and patterns. The figures with realistic features have facial scarification and many finely detailed ornaments. This pair of busts presents a beautiful symmetry. The two figures wear a cross-braced garment with a collar bearing a bell.
The horns themselves are covered with geometric patterns and sculpted faces. At the top of each horn sits a soldier, helmet on his head and weapon in his fist.

The art of Benin is described as a court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as the oba. The tradition of Ifè bronze court objects dates back to the 14th century.

The numerous bronze heads and ...


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5990.00





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