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African art - African statues : tribal fetish, maternity:

Often the work of blacksmiths who work on soft woods, African statuary includes statues of ancestors, dolls, statuettes of twins. All these statues offer geometric forms with angular contours, elongated features, sometimes with a severe expression. The arms can be glued to the body, or on the contrary, they can move away from it. We find seated or standing figures, arms and knees bent or as with the Dogon Tellem, arms raised towards the sky imploring for the coming of rain. The statues can also be used as fetishes for all sorts of animist practices, mainly in the Congo. Some are made of bronze as in the Benin kingdom. For the traditional African, their function is to make invisible realities visible.


Ngbandi figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ngbandi figure

A faceted face with a protruding chin, offering the traditional striations punctuating the nasal bridge, and a small figure with truncated arms, separated from the crater bust carried by ringed legs. Oiled patina, nuanced, reddish brown.
The many carved objects are, among the Ngandi, related to hunting and magic. Some represent the Ngbirondo spirit and act as guardians of the village.
Funerary statues were also used, and sculptures of couple yangba and his sister, equivalent to the Seto and Nabo ancestors of the Ngbaka.

The Ngbaka form a homogeneous people in the north-west of the DRC, south of Ubangui. The Ngbandi live in the east (on the left bank of the Oubangui) and the Ngombe in the south. The initiation of young people, "gaza" or "ganza" (which gives ...


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280.00

Tabwa statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Tabwa statue

This type of symbolic sculpture was used during enthronement rites. Grainy, velvety black patina. Desication cracks.
The Tabwa ("scarify" and "write") constitute an ethnic group present in the South-East of the DRC, around Lake Tanganyika. The tribes of this region, such as the Tumbwe, worship the mipasi ancestors through sculptures held by chiefs or sorcerers. A magical charge (dawa) was frequently placed on top of the statues' heads. Soothsayers-healers used this type of object to reveal witchcraft and protect against malevolent spirits. .
Simple farmers without centralized power, the Tabwa federated around tribal chiefs after coming under the influence of the Luba. It was mainly during this period that their artistic current was expressed mainly through statues but also ...


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240.00

Pende Figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Pende Figure

Statuette featuring a dancer from the Pende Minganji masquerade from Zaire, wearing his full raffia fishnet costume. Léon de Sousberghe identified two types of masks, the minganji associated with male society and the mbuya masks associated with the village, with a few exceptions.
The Western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the Eastern settled on the banks of the Kasaï downstream from Tshikapa. The influences of neighboring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity, the Mbuya masks, realistic, produced every ten years, take on a festive function, and embody different characters, including the chief, the diviner and his wife, the prostitute, the possessed, etc... The masks of ...


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180.00

Tabwa statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Tabwa statue

An ancestor figure intended to sit on an altar, this African tribal art figure, bears the facial and body scarification of the Batabwa clans.
Dark glossy patina, abrasions.
The Tabwa ("scarify" and "write") are an ethnic group found in southeastern DRC, around Lake Tanganyika. Tribes in this region, such as the Tumbwe , worship ancestors mipasi through carvings held by chiefs or sorcerers. A magical charge ( dawa )was frequently inserted atop the statues' heads. The diviners-healers used this type of object to reveal sorcery and protect against malevolent spirits.
Simple farmers without centralized power, the Tabwa federated around tribal chiefs after having been influenced by the Luba. It was mainly during this period that their artistic current was ...


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Tabwa statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Tabwa statue

This type of object, human figures perched on the shoulders of their fellows, is characteristic of sculptures associated with enthronement rites. Brown satin patina. The Tabwa ("scarify" and "write") are an ethnic group found in southeastern DRC, around Lake Tanganyika. Tribes in this region, such as the Tumbwe , worship ancestors mipasi through carvings held by chiefs or witch doctors. A magical charge ( dawa )was frequently inserted atop the statues' heads. The diviners-healers used this type of object to reveal sorcery and protect against malevolent spirits.
Simple farmers without centralized power, the Tabwa federated around tribal chiefs after having been influenced by the Luba. It was mainly during this period that their artistic current was expressed mainly ...


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Makonde Figure
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Makonde Figure

Sculpted with sensitivity, this naturalistic figure is devoid of integumentary ornaments. The facial features have been carefully modeled, imprinting the labial deformation due to the traditional labret.
Beautiful oiled patina encrusted with red pigments.
The Makonde, a matrilineal Bantu people of northern Mozambique and southern Tanzania, wore helmet masks called lipiko, mapiko, during initiation ceremonies for young people . The Makonde worship an ancestor, which explains the abundance of relatively naturalistic female statuary. In addition to face masks, midimu, the Makonde also produce body masks featuring the female bust, exalting fertility.


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Beembe statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Beembe statue

The Beembé are appreciated in African art for the care and finishing given to the sculptures of ancestors.
Couple of statues figured side by side. Intricate keloid tattoos are drawn in relief from the chest to the pubis. These scarifications bear witness to the successive stages of initiation to which an individual has been subjected. Sometimes set with ivory or earthenware, the almond-shaped eyes are encrusted with horn. This type of sculpture formed a support intended for the rituals of the Lemba society, with a view to healing for example. Golden satin patina, dark highlights, deep erosions.
Established on the plateaus of the People's Republic of Congo ex.Brazzaville, and not to be confused with the Bembe group of northern Lake Tanganinyika, the small Babembé group, ...


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Zande statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Zande statue

Of a particularly creative design, this sculpted figure breaks down into three blocks: a large and strange head on which develop huge ear flaps, a bust flanked by arcs of circles which would represent truncated arms, stocky legs with muscular globular framing a male sex placed in evidence. Sculpted details punctuate the morphology, realistic gaze with hollowed-out pupils, incisions.
Dark satin patina, warm reflections. Lacks.
Formerly designated under the name "Niam-Niam" because considered as cannibals, the tribes grouped under the name of Zande, Azandé, settled, coming from Chad, on the border of the R.D.C. (Zaire), Sudan and the Central African Republic. According to their beliefs, man is endowed with two souls, one of which is transformed upon his death into an ...


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280.00

Kissi stone
African art > Monolith, megalith, cross river, nkoro, african art > Kissi stone

Ex.Jacques Anquetil collection "Africa, the hands of the world" by J .Anquetil, ed. Solar ) by Jacques Anquetil , African art collector, actor originally, then initiated to weaving among the Dogon, author of several books.
Among the tribes living in Sierra Leone, Mende and Kissi, mostly rice farmers, worship stone statues dating from the Sapi kingdom. The latter extended, until the 16th century, from Guinea to Liberia. The Temné organized themselves into chiefdoms headed by a supreme chief. The ragbenle or mneke society, responsible for fertility, intervened when the chief died. The bundu ...


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390.00

Statue Mangbetu
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Mangbetu

African art Mangbetu.
Body paintings and scarifications, evoked by geometric tracings, run across the face and body of this primitive art figure. Very large ears are to be noted, as well as an extrusion of the pupils probably linked to the trance caused by mediumistic invocations. The tribal fan-shaped hairstyle is characteristic of Mangbetu women: from a very young age, the children had their skulls compressed by means of raffia ties. Later, young women would "knit" their hair onto strands of wicker and apply a headband to the forehead in order to extract the hair and produce this particular headdress that accentuates the elongation of the head. The ancients call beli these figures of ancestors stored out of sight and comparable to those belonging to their secret society nebeli ...


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Fetish Suku
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Fetish Suku

Ex-collection of British African tribal art.

A crouching posture for this figure supporting with his hands an imposing head with a thick snub-nosed "muzzle", evoking an evil spirit named kiteke. The strange cylindrical ears are also a notable feature. In neighboring Kongo clans, the naked, crouching posture, sondama , evokes an emergency action, attacking enemies in a supernatural way. Glossy patina. Cracks of desiccation. Lacks on a foot.
The Suku and Yaka ethnic groups, which are geographically very close in the southwest of the Democratic Republic of Congo, have the same social and political structure and similar cultural practices. They can only be differentiated by their stylistic variations. Hierarchical and authoritarian, composed of formidable warriors, Yaka ...


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150.00

Statue Chokwe
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Chokwe

This African sculpture Chokwe is an object of prestige, where sharp angles and tubular and rounded volumes are harmoniously close. The female effigy supports a lidded container that served as a receptacle for tobacco, its use being widespread among the Chokwe, smoke being an integral part of offerings to spirits ajimu . Characteristic of the chokwe statuary, the proportions of the digitized feet contrast with the whole object.
Golden brown patina, desication cracks.
Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwé were then subjected to the Lunda empire from which they inherited a new hierarchical system and the sanctity of power. Nevertheless, the Chokwes never fully embraced these new social and political contributions. Three centuries later, they ...


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Yombe figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yombe figure

Character chewing a hallucinogenic root. He presents a glazed gaze that refers to mediumistic abilities. This type of sculpture sometimes illustrates a proverb. Black patina, desication cracks.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembe, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by King ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary endowed with a codified gesture in relation to their vision of the world. The nganga sorcerers, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God called Nzambi through consecrated figures. Aggressive kindoki sorcery is the absolute evil that must be fought. ...


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280.00

Songye figure
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Songye figure

Carved in dense wood, this bust figure adopts the physiognomy of the African kifwebe mask from the Bwadi ka bifwebe society. The bishimba magic charge, with a protective aim, is absent. Glossy patina, cracks.
The Songye fetish, magic sculpture Nkisi, nkishi (pl. mankishi), plays the role of mediator between gods and men. The large specimens are the collective property of an entire village, the more modest figures reserved for individual or family use. In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle in Kasai, Katanga and South Kivu. Their society is organized in a patriarchal way. Their history is inseparable from that of the Luba, to whom they are related through common ancestors. Very present in their society, divination made it possible to discover ...


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280.00

Salampasu figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Salampasu figure

Human figure associated with ancestor worship and fertility rites. The figure represents a masked person. Her bust is tied, a pearl and a cowrie assembled and tied in the small of the back. A fragment of leather remains on the posterior part of the head. Dark patina, abrasions.
Formerly living from hunting and agriculture, a warrior people, the Salampasu form a tribe of the Lulua group and are settled between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Angola, east of the Kasai River. They are surrounded to the west and south by the Tschokwe and the Lunda, and to the north and east by the Kete and the Lwalwa. A hierarchy of masks, simple wooden kasangu masks and copper-covered mukinka masks, was associated with the society of mungongo warriors (pl. < i>bangongo ). The wearing of these ...


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380.00

Baoule statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Baoule statue

Property of the diviner komienfoué , often involved in divinatory practices of Mbra , this female effigy evoking a seated oussou , a "genius of nature" , linked to fertility, is shown standing, her child on the back. A headdress arranged in multiple shells, checkerboard scarifications, pearl adornments, and the vigor of calves adapted to agricultural work, are part of the features of Baoulé statuary.
Desiccation cracks. Polychrome patina, locally abraded.
Two types of statues are produced by the baoulé in the ritual framework: The statues Waka-Sona , "being of wood" in baoulé, evoke a seated oussou , being of the Earth. They are part of a type of statues intended for use as a medium tool by the Komian diviners, the latter being selected by the asye usu spirits ...


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Ibedji figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ibedji figure

Ex-French African art collection.
Elegantly styled, this female African statuette has a thick metallic torque. She wears cheek scarifications. Smooth mahogany patina. Sculpted according to the indications of Ifa transmitted to the diviner, the babalawo, the Ibedji statuettes played the role of substitute for the death of the child. The statues are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of it; she anoints them with oil and feeds them regularly. If it disappears, the remaining twin takes over. Considered more than a physical representation of a loved one, connected to the cult of Shango, ibedji statues are believed to influence the life and prosperity of the family, and the family continues to address prayers to them at household altars ...


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175.00

Statuette Baoulé
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statuette Baoulé

Statue Waka -Sona, 'being of wood' in baoulé, representing a slender young woman, wearing braided hair and then picked up in two parallel shells. It is probably a figure belonging to the category Blolo bia . . The dark brown patina is glossy, thinned by the abrasion on the reliefs. Long crack.
Two types of statues Waka-Sona are indeed produced by the baoulé in the ritual framework: those that evoke a assid oussou, being from the earth, and are part of a set of statues intended to be used as a medium tool by the Komian soothsayers, the latter being selected by the spirits asye usu in order to communicate the revelations of the afterlife. The second type of statues are the spouses of the afterlife, male, Blolo bian or female, the blolo bia .
A sixty ethnic groups populate Côte ...


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180.00

New product
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > New product

The palatial tribal art of Benin.Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. War scenes were reproduced on narrative plates, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chefs, heavy bracelets, hairs and recades were produced in quantity in many workshops of smelters according to the technique of cast iron with lost wax. The killing of the king of animals associated with the legends, the leopard, was the privilege of the chief, the Oba. The feline could then serve as an offering for the worship of the chief's head. Sometimes tamed by various royal guilds, he accompanied the chief on his travels. The Oba, named " ...


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Yoruba altar
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba altar

It is in a carved sculpture intended to appear on a Yoruba altar that a deified ancestor, or one of the multiple gods, orisa, is embodied here, comparable to Christian saints. The latter animate the Yoruba pantheon, either the divine messenger Esù or Elégba. The equine, rare in the region, constituted a prestigious attribute which was reserved for the nobility and the sovereigns. The miniature figures would embody followers, provided with symbolic objects.
Crusty matte patina, desiccation cracks, losses.
The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name of Nago. They are patrilineal, practice excision and circumcision. Centered on its multiple gods or orisa, the Yoruba religion is famous for its ...


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390.00

Mangbetu statue
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Mangbetu statue

The linear motifs running through this statuette refer to the traditional paintings of the ethnic group, inspired by the tattoos of the neighboring Asua pygmies and which evolved according to circumstances. Among the Mangbetu from an early age, children of the upper classes also suffered compression of the cranial box, held tight by raffia ties. Later, the hair was "knitted" on wicker strands and a headband encircled the forehead in order to bring out the hair and constitute this majestic headdress accentuating the elongation of the skull. The ancients call beli the anthropomorphic figures embodying ancestors, stored out of sight, and comparable to those belonging to their secret society nebeli.

Orange-brown patina, cracks and losses.
The Mangebetu kingdom in ...


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290.00





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