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African art - African Statues:

Often the work of blacksmiths who work on soft woods, African statuary includes statues of ancestors, dolls, statuettes of twins. All these statues offer geometric shapes with angular contours, elongated features, sometimes a severe expression. The arms can be glued to the body, or on the other hand they can move away from it. There are characters sitting or standing, arms and knees bent or as the Dogons Tellem with arms raised to the sky pleading for the coming of rain.


Statues Iginga Sakimatwematwe League
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African art > African Statues > Statues League

Combined with a notion of foresight, this African sculpture Sakimatwematwe (Multi-heads) forms a symbol for an insider of the Bwami. Thick, half-flexed legs support a trunk on which eight bleached faces clump together, with their eyes exorbitated in opposite directions. Locally chipped granular patina.
The teacher guided the aspirant to a place where masks and statuettes were exposed, and it was through careful observation that the future initiate had to guess the more or less complex meaning of these metaphors, the latter referring largely to proverbs and sayings. Those who were not allowed to see the object, in order to be protected, had to submit to expensive ceremonies, and sometimes even join the lower rank of the Bwami, the kongabulumbu, at great expense to the families. Each ...

Statuette Hemba
African art > African Statues > Statuette Hemba

Tribal ancestor sculpture, intermediate between men and gods, endowed with an oversized head and figured in an assured attitude. The shaved skull is bounded by a frontal tiara composed of a succession of bars. The face is decorated with a beard, associated with the wisdom and experience of the grandfather. Usually made in iroko, these ritual sculptures were revered by a particular clan and stored in funeral premises in the chief's house. Oiled dark brown patina, locally abraded. Damaged base.
The Hemba, established in southeastern Zaire, on the right bank of the Lualaba, have long been subject to the luba neighbour who had a definite influence on their culture, religion and art. The cult of ancestors, whose effigies have long been attributed to the Luba, is central to the society ...


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180.00

Statuette Teke
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African art > African Statues > Statue Teke

A massive neck is topped with a face with voluntary expression. The rectangular beard overlooks a body whose abdomen has been hollowed out to contain the mystical charge called Bonga. A difference in hue between the body and legs demonstrates the age of this figure Buti Teke hermaphrodite (no apparent sex). Similarly this body was originally wrapped in a tissue that held the load in the abdominal cavity. The age of the piece explains the current absence of this fabric. The face and neck are coated with a sacrificial crusty patina.
Andeblis between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Teké were organized into chiefdoms whose leader was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right to life or death over his family whose importance ...


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League figurines
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African art > African Statues > League Statues

Ex Belgian African art collection.
The primitive art of lega, Balega, or Warega, is distinguished by its initiation statuettes, also made of ivory, some of which were kept in a basket for the highest rank of bwami from different communities. This type of statuette of tribal art Iginga ( Maginga plural), was the property of the high-ranking officers of the Bwami , a secret society admitting men and their wives, and governing social life. This organization was subdivided into initiation stages, the highest being the Kindi. The statuettes were used as the aspirants were inited. Each is a representation with a particular form and meaning from which a moral or dogma always derives. The particularity of the Lega, unlike other ethnic groups, is to judge the quality of their ritual objects ...


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Zande ancestor figure
African art > African Statues > Statue Zande

The Zande mainly produced two types of works, the Kudu, between 30 and 50 cm high, representing ancestors, and the statues Yanda 10 to 20 cm, of animal or human form, having an apotropaic role, exhibited during divinatory rites during the rituals of the society Mani. This male figure, with reduced arms and muscular, offers a tubular bust and stocky, rounded lower limbs. The face is characteristic of statues of ancestors not belonging to the categories mentioned above. Oiled black patina. Fine crack on the head.
odies referred to as Niam-Niam because they are considered anthropophages, the tribes grouped under the name Zande , Azandé , settled, from Chad, on the border of the R.D.C. (Zaire), Sudan and the Central African Republic. According to their beliefs, man is endowed with two ...


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280.00

Statue Lengola
African art > African Statues > Statue Lengola

The stylized African art of the forest tribesCubic volumes and sharp angles make up this Lengola statue, whose characteristics are similar to Metoko sculptures. A flat-cut face, with its orbits with two large, lowered eyelids, ends in a geometric jaw at the end of which the mouth is just incised. The short arms, spread from the straight bust, are equipped with large digitized hands. The apron hips are extended with parallel tubular limbs on rounded feet. Cracks, beautiful satin patina and abraded. This male cult effigy comes from the Lengola , living near the Metoko in the center of the Congolese basin between the Lomami and Lualaba rivers, people of the primary forest dedicated to the worship of a single God, rare monotheism in Africa. Their company, Bukota , welcoming both men and ...


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380.00

Bambara Jonyeleni Cup Carrier
African art > African Statues > Statue Bambara

This African figure seems to fit into the category of sculptures featuring a 'little favorite', Dyonyeni, Nyeleni in Bambara, a young girl at the height of her beauty. The head with a crest is traditionally framed by braids. The presentation of an offering cup symbolizes a ritual. The base of the room is damaged.
Beautlyted surface. Dark, oily, locally thinned patina. It is possible to order a suitable base in black wood 18/18 cm.
The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and Malinke. They believe in the existence of a creative god generically called Ngala who possesses 266 sacred attributes: one for each day of the 9 lunar months that lasts the gestation of a child. Ngala maintains order to the universe. Its existence coexists ...


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240.00

 Sapi Nomoli figure
African art > African Statues > Sapi figure

Among the tribes living in Sierra Leone, Mende and Kissi, mostly rice farmers, worship stone statues from the Sapi kingdom. The latter extended, until the 16th century, from Guinea to Liberia.The Temné organized themselves into chiefdoms led by a supreme leader. The society ragbenle or mneke, responsible for fertility, intervened at the death of the chief. The association bundu, for its part, prepared the girls for their adult lives. The Temne and bullom have made a lot of 'Afro-Portuguese' ivories European orders. The 'nomoli' Begged, placed on altars, benefited from libations in order to increase the harvests. These stone sculptures, mostly in steatite or saponite, called pombo (deceased) played, on the other hand, among the Kissi of Guinea, an intermediary role with the ancestors. The ...


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380.00

 Chibinda Ilunga Chokwe figure
African art > African Statues > Chibinda Ilunga Chokwe figure

This is a statuette of Chibinda Ilunga, founder of the Chokwé.
Here he is found sitting in a suit, arms bent, hands close to the body. The pitched back and raised chin indicate a proud and dominant attitude. Its very special headdress with two side parts and a curved penne towards the back makes it easy to recognize.


Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwé were then subjected to the Lunda empire from which they inherited a new hierarchical system and the sanctity of power. Nevertheless, the Chokwes never fully embraced these new social and political contributions. Three centuries later, they eventually seized the capital of Lunda weakened by internal conflicts, thus contributing to the dismantling of the kingdom. The Chokwe did not ...


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780.00

Luba Figure
African art > African Statues > Luba statue

In the Luba, the female representations are characterized by the permanence of a morphology with stretched limbs, such as this sculpture of woman sitting with legs and arms outstretched, going about one of many daily occupations, such as kneading a vegetable paste. Lacking the classic scarifications, however, it is depicted wearing, among the infinite variety of tyles of luba hairstyles, of hair coated with palm oil, topped in a building of layered bulges, like the hair adornments of the Luba Waholoholo, (Holoholo) subgroup, of the Lake Tanganyika region.
The Luba (Baluba in Chiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is the Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River, hence the name (Baluba, which means \


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160.00

Statuette Mumuye / Chamba
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African art > African Statues > Statue Mumuye

Belgian African art collection.
It is in the region of north-eastern Nigeria, limited by the Benoué loop and the Cameroonian border, that the group of about 100,000 Mumuye live, mainly from agriculture. As the area was difficult to access, they remained relatively isolated until 1950. Their statuary was discovered around 1968. The Mumuye of Nigeria, like the Tiv, are organized into initiation societies staggered into age classes that take place for young boys in a box, tsafi, in which the statues are stored. They reinforce the prestige of their holder, but also participate in healing rituals, divination and ordalies. This figure has upper limbs spread out of the bust, hands leaning on the lower abdomen, legs spaced in the extension of the pelvis. These traits are generally found in ...


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Couple of statuettes Ere ibedji Yoruba
African art > African Statues > Statues Ibedji

Featuring numerous protective adornments and accessories, these doll statuettes are (statues), the incarnation of twins, feature a conical hairstyle made of braids, tinged with indigo. The strings of currants symbolize values of wealth and fertility.
SPatine lustrous mahogany.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash it and feed it regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man also sometimes had ibeji for his wife in the hope of pregnancy. Supporting the twin's soul, ibeji influences the life of the family, becoming a source of benefit to his parents, ...

Ancestor figure Hemba Singiti
African art > African Statues > Statuette hemba

This small protective figure Hemba, whose characteristics were once attributed to the Luba, embodies an ancestor. Created in order to communicate with the guardian spirits, this sculpture was part of the U-002mvidye", intermediaries between the spiritual world and individuals, which can also embody the spirits of nature in the Luba of Kasai.The leaders of Hemba clan had several statues of ancestors that they worshipped and to which they dedicated offerings in order to astound their legitimacy. This character adopts the classical position, hands valuing a protruding abdomen, symbol of lineage. It also features the sophisticated headdress, hollowed out in the shape of a cross. Dark brown part whose protrusions are abraded by use. Satin surface.
The Luba (Baluba in Chiluba) are a ...


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125.00

Statuette Mumuye
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African art > African Statues > Mumuye Fetish

A pointy growth caps our little mumuye sculpture. The sculptor named rati or molabaiene, sculpted this figure according to the traditional criteria in use. Sketched lines, notches, and scarifications in cat mustache. A recurrence, crenellating limbs and arms in The V glued to the bust. Satin patina, scattered abrasions.
The statuary emanating from the northwestern region of the middle Benoué, Kona Jukun, Mumuye and even the Wurkun populations stands out for its relative absence of ornamentation and uncluttered stylization. The 100,000 Adamawa-speaking speakers form a group called Mumuye and are grouped into villages, dola, divided into two groups: those of fire ( tjokwa ) relating to blood and red color, guardians of the cult vabong, among which are elected the chiefs, and those of ...


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Statuette Luba Mikisi mihake
African art > African Statues > Statuette Luba

This sculpted luba figure is loaded with therapeutic ingredients introduced by the sorcerer at the top of the head. An orifice is indeed present on the skull. The Luba consider the efficiency of their sculpted objects according to the refinement of the latter. This protective effigy embodies a political and spiritual intermediary, a role held by women in Luba royalty. The umbilical has a prominence that also emphasizes its role of fertility and transmission of life. Erosions, satin semi-mate patina, ochre pigments.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is the Katanga, specifically the region of the Lubu River, so the name (Baluba, which means the Lubas). They were born from a secession of the Songhoy ethnic group, under the leadership of Ilunga ...


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280.00

Statuette Attié
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African art > African Statues > Statuette Attié

African art of the lagoon populations of Côte d'Ivoire.
The lagoon populations of eastern Côte d'Ivoire include mainly Attié, Akyé, Ebrié and Abouré. Their sculptures offer many similarities. These kingdoms had the first commercial establishments offering gold, ivory, slaves and pepper to the West.Among the group of Akan , the Attié , of Akye-Fo, ", the holders of the Blade", divide among the those in the North and those in the South. The Attié , palm oil producers, also harvest yam, corn and bananas. Their traditional and festive ceremonies are an opportunity to flaunt a wide variety of objects, some of them gold or gold-covered. (source: Ivory Coast Treasures, F.Neyt) Camped on wide feet, the female figure holds a hairstyle or a load on his head with his arms raised. The conical ...


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Statue of Igbo divinity
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African art > African Statues > Statue of Igbo divinity

Ex-collection of English-African art

The Igbo venerate a considerable number of deities known as alusi, or agbara, considered to be the descendants of Chuku, or Chukwu, and as such are intermediaries to whom sacrifices such as that kola nuts, silver, kaolin, are granted in order to enjoy their favors.These sculptures produced in several regions range from about forty centimeters to a human size, and are adorned with aristocratic attributes more or less elaborate.The sculptors turn out to be men, but female followers often contribute by completing the work with colored pigments.In the case of the statue presented, articulated arms, when they were positioned horizontally, indicated the will to receive the offering of the adepts, and integumentary headdress and ornaments ...


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580.00 € 480.00 ( -17.2 %)

Statuette Bembé
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African art > African Statues > Statuette Bembe

This female figure with a child on her shoulders is related to the rites of passage or induction. The keloid tattoos bear witness to the successive stages of the initiation to which the individual was subjected. Sometimes set with ivory, earthenware or horn, the almond eyes are bleached here. Extra black wood base.
Oneblis on the plateaus of the People's Republic of Congo ex. Brazzaville, and not to be confused with the Bembé group of northern Lake Tanganinyika, the small Babembé group, Béembé, was influenced by the Téke rites and culture, but especially by that of the Kongo.Installed in the present-day Republic of Congo, the Beembe originally formed the kingdom of Kongo, along with the Vili, Yombé, Bwendé and B. They were under the tutelage of the king ntotela elected by the ...


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Figure of dignitary Benin
African art > African bronze > Bronze Benin

This commemorative figure of dignitary forms an intermediary between the spiritual world and the Edo people, and stands out thanks to a garment including sumptuous adornments of necklaces and talismans in agate and coral beads. Perched on a barrel-shaped piedestal, his attitude reflects presence and dignity. The kings of Benin being soldiers above all, he is represented with symbolic attributes illustrating power. Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba , was illustrated by numerous works celebrating their power. War scenes glorifying them were reproduced on narrative plates, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, majestic felines, heavy bracelets, ...


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380.00

Statue Dogon Bombou- toro
African art > African Statues > Statue Dogon

Work illustrating the statuary from the central part of the Bandiagara cliff, bombou-toro. This statue stands out thanks to its hairstyle composed of braided ridges, long graceful limbs, a high conical chest, a seat whose feet appear to be beings belonging to dogon mythology. Bracelets are engraved on the arms, and scarifications are inscribed on the face and body. Grainy matte patina.

Sculpted mostly by a family, Dogon statues can also be worshipped by the entire community when they commemorate, for example, the founding of the village. Their functions, however, remain little known. Parallel to Islam, the Dogon religious rites are organized around four main cults: the Lebe, relating to fertility, under the spiritual authority of the Hogon, the Wagem, cult of ancestors under ...


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350.00

Teke Mpwau statue
African art > African Statues > Teke figure

Joined back to back, these figures of Téké or Biteke ancestors share a hollowed-out, reworked, glass-blocked common core to shelter the mystical charge called Bonga. The whole thing is tied and coated with crusty materials. The faces streaked with traditional scarifications, bordered by a wide collar encrusted with cauris, are topped with a large crescent.
Andeblis between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Teké were organized into chiefdoms whose leader was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right to life or death over his family whose importance determined his prestige. The clan leader, ngantié , kept the great tar-mantsie protective fetish that oversaw all the ceremonies. It was the mighty sorcerer and soothsayer who ...


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380.00





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