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African art - African statues : tribal fetish, maternity:

Often the work of blacksmiths who work on soft woods, African statuary includes statues of ancestors, dolls, statuettes of twins. All these statues offer geometric forms with angular contours, elongated features, sometimes with a severe expression. The arms can be glued to the body, or on the contrary, they can move away from it. We find seated or standing figures, arms and knees bent or as with the Dogon Tellem, arms raised towards the sky imploring for the coming of rain. The statues can also be used as fetishes for all sorts of animist practices, mainly in the Congo. Some are made of bronze as in the Benin kingdom. For the traditional African, their function is to make invisible realities visible.


Figure of chef Chokwe Chibinda Ilunga
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Tschokwe figure

Ex-collection German African art.

The carved effigy, opposite, glorifies the qualities of hunter, mythical hero and founder of the ethnic group, Chibinda Ilunga. The chief, with oversized palms and feet, has an impressive noble headdress. Easily recognizable thanks to this large headdress with curved side wings (cipenya-mutwe), he had taught his people the art of hunting. This work is distinguished by its various finely chiseled details. Originally, the patinas were obtained through the repeated application of castor oil and coloring vegetable decoctions. Brown mahogany reflections highlight this Chokwe statue. Very good condition. Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the sixteenth century, the Chokwe were then subjected to the Lunda Empire from which they ...

Ere Ibeji Yoruba figure
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba figure

Wearing braids organized in an arched crest, this female statuette rising from a circular base has deep scarification, beaded necklaces embellished with grigris and large rings constituting the protective ornaments abiku .
Carved according to the indications of the Ifa transmitted to the diviner, the babalawo, the Ibedji statuettes played the role of substitute for the death of the child. The statuettes are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of them; she anoints them with oil and feeds them regularly. If she disappears, the remaining twin takes over. Considered as much more than a physical representation of a loved one. The ibedji statues influence the life of the family, which is why the latter continues to address prayers ...


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Azande/Boa fetish statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Zande figurine

African art among the Zande.
Very expressionist janiform statuette, with deformed limbs and endowed with a face reproducing the masks of the group. The head has an opening for fetish or therapeutic materials.
Brown satin patina.
Desication cracks, erosions.
Formerly referred to as "Niam-Niam" because they were considered cannibals, the tribes grouped together under the name of Zande, Azandé, settled, coming from Chad, on the border of the DRC (Zaire), Sudan and the Central African Republic. The Zande, or "those who own a lot of land", use two types of statues: Kudu statues with a height between 30 and 50 cm represent ancestors. There are also so-called Yanda statues of 10 to 20 cm, in animal or human form, having an apotropaic role which were exhibited during ...


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340.00

Statue "colon" Baule
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Colon Baoule

Western influences in African art Baoulé .
Commonly called "colon" but sometimes embodying however a type of "ideal spouse" according to individual criteria, this male figure, coated with a polychrome patina softened, is represented in Western dress (African Art Western Eyes, Baule", Vogel, p.253 to 257).
Two types of statues are produced by the baoulé in the ritual context: The Waka-Sona statues, "being of wood" in Baoulé, evoke a assié oussou, being of the earth. They are one of a type of statues intended to be used as medium tools by Komien soothsayers, the latter being selected by the asye usu spirits in order to communicate revelations from beyond. The second type of statues, made according to the indications of the diviner, are the spouses of the beyond, masculine, the ...


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95.00

Lega Bwami figure of initiation
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lega figure

Sculpture relating to a proverb only known to initiates, this human figure has an erect arm and a stump. This attitude generally symbolizes the appeasement of a quarrel through the arbitration of an individual.
Clear abraded patina.
Desiccation cracks.
The tribal art of the Lega , Balega, or even Warega, is distinguished by its initiation statuettes, some of which were kept in a basket intended for the highest ranking officers of the Bwami from different communities. This type of Iginga tribal art statuette ( Maginga in the plural), was the property of the high-ranking officers of Bwami , a secret society admitting men and their wives, and governing social life. This organization was subdivided into initiatory stages, the highest being the ...


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190.00

Power Figure Teke Buti
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Teke statue

Statue biteke (sculpted figure) embodying an ancestor of the clan. His hollow bust must have housed the magical charge called " Bonga " or "bilongo", which was generally fixed or concealed by a textile. This symbolism refers to the Téké belief that the abdomen conceals wisdom. These fetishes were placed on the altars of the chiefs.
Matte patina.
Established between the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Republic of the Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized into chiefdoms, the chief of which was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right of life or death over his family, the importance of which determined his prestige. The chief of the clan, ngantsié , kept the great protective fetish tar mantsié which ...


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180.00

Senoufo figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Senoufo figure

Figure sculpted for divination purposes, this statuette has "hooves" hands placed on either side of the abdomen. The face is streaked with linear scarifications obliquely. Light brown satin patina. Abrasions. Desiccation cracks.
The Senoufos, a name given to them by French settlers, are mainly made up of farmers who have dispersed between Mali, Côte d'Ivoire, and Burkina Faso. Ruled by matrilineal traditions, their villages are made up of clusters of dwellings called katiolo . Each of them has its own Poro association which initiates young boys from the age of seven in a succession of three cycles lasting seven years. When one of the Poro members died, the statues named pombibele were on display. Although exclusively male, the Poro company in fact pays homage with these ...


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240.00

Hemba Singiti statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Hemba statue

A local chief's effigy believed to facilitate contact with tutelary spirits, the African statuette Hemba, opposite, was originally attributed to the Luba. Hemba clan leaders had several ancestor statues that they venerated, and to which they dedicated offerings in order to establish their legitimacy. The attitude is classical, hands resting on a protruding abdomen, symbol of lineage. The cruciform headdress is delimited by a wide sculpted band like the beard. Light brown patina with ochre residue. Desiccation cracks. The Hemba, established in southeastern Zaire on the right bank of the Lualaba River, were for a long time subject to the neighboring Luba empire, which had a definite influence on their culture, religion and art. Ancestor worship, whose effigies have long been ...


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350.00

Ancestor statue Singiti Hemba Niembo
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Hemba

Ex-French African art collection.
A profile with sharp angles, this figure of ancestor, intermediate between men and gods, stands out for its alt-like attitude and its camped position showing calm and stability. The shaved head is bounded by a frontal tiara consisting of a succession of bars. A sophisticated headdress ends at the back of the head in a cruciform element. The face is decorated with a crenellated V-beard, evoking the wisdom and experience of the forefather. . Usually made in iroko, these ritual sculptures were venerated by a particular clan and stored in burial rooms in the chief's house. Oiled dark brown patina, locally matted. Desication cracks, powdery residues of red ochre bark on the base.
The Hemba, based in southeastern Zaire, on the right bank of the ...

Figure of ancestor Hemba Singiti
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Hemba

Ex-collection of French African art.
Symbolizing a local chief, this Hemba effigy, whose characteristics were once attributed to the Luba, was carved to create a link with the guardian spirits. The Hemba clan leaders had several statues of ancestors whom they venerated and to which they dedicated offerings in order to establish their legitimacy. The position is classic, hands valuing a protruding abdomen, symbol of lineage. The sophisticated headdress is bounded by a tiara.

Black brown Patine. Satin surface. Split base.
The Luba (Baluba in Tchiluba) are a people of Central Africa, established in the south-east of the R.D.C, on plains surrounded by streams. Their cradle is the Katanga, specifically the region of the Lubu River, so the name (Baluba, which means the ...


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Baule couple figures
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Baoule statue

The "Asye usu" in the African tribal art sculptures of the Baule.
Considered rarer than the standing representations, these sculptures of a couple with a slender body, seated, offer the classic integumentary ornaments, numerous checkered scarifications and neat headdresses, testifying to the concept of beauty of the Baoulé. During public divination ceremonies where the diviner staged them, these statues formed indispensable ritual supports. About sixty ethnic groups inhabit Côte d'Ivoire, including the Baoulé, in the center, Akans from Ghana, people of the savannah, practicing hunting and agriculture, as well as the Gouro from whom they borrowed ritual cults and masks. carved.


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Couple statuesBaule Asié usu
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Baoule statues

The "geniuses of nature" in African art
In ritual settings, "asié oussou" sculptures embody beings of the earth. They are part of a type of statues intended to be used as a medium tool by komien diviners, the latter being selected by the asye usu spirits in order to communicate revelations from the beyond. When it comes to the representation of a couple, despite their comparable characteristics to the Baule statues of mystical spouses "blolo bian" or "blolo bia", the Baule couple effigies still belong to the category of asiè usu or genies of nature .
Sitting on narrow stools of the akan type, these statues embody "spirits of nature" (asie usu)The morphologies and posture are elegant. The braided hairstyles are gathered in hulls, the bodies dotted with scarifications. ...

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Figure of Mangbetu Nebeli ancestor
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Mangbetu statue

The traditional paintings of the Mangbetu ethnic group, inspired by the tattoos of the neighboring Asua pygmies, and evolving according to the circumstances, are represented on this statue thanks to linear patterns.
Among the Mangbetu from an early age, children of the upper classes also suffered compression of the skull, held tight by raffia ties. Later, the hair was "knitted" on wicker strands and a headband encircled the forehead in order to bring out the hair and constitute this majestic headdress accentuating the elongation of the skull. The ancients called beli the anthropomorphic figures embodying ancestors, stored out of sight, and comparable to those belonging to their secret society nebeli .

Reddish brown patina, native restorations on the arms. ...

Kwéré / Zaramo fertility doll
African art > African Dolls > Mwana hiti doll

The Zaramo and the tribes that surround them, such as the Kwere and the Doé, have designed dolls that are generally associated with fertility, but to which other virtues are attributed. Its primary role is played during the period of seclusion of the young Zaramo initiate. The novice will behave towards the object as she would towards a child, and will dance with it during the closing ceremonies of the initiation. In the event that the young woman does not conceive, she will adopt the "child. Among the Zaramo, this carved motif is repeated at the top of canes, decorates ritual objects and even appears on burial posts. The form is recurrent, a stylized head, topped with a double or single crest surmounting a tubular bust without arms on which a slight relief indicates the breasts and ...


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240.00

Kakongo Nkisi fetish figure
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Kakongo fetish

The Vili , the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé, and the Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, led by the king ntotela . Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory and copper trade and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary with codified gestures related to their worldview. The Kakongo are composed of Bakongo tribes from the left bank of the Zaire River. Sorcerers nganga , both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God called Nzambi through consecrated figures. To this end, individual protective figures nkisis, to protect against witchcraft and various plagues, are made and loaded by the nganga with all the necessary ingredients to achieve this purpose.


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120.00

Nkisi Kongo Yombé couple figures
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statues Yombé

Ex French African art collection.
These Kongo statues forming a couple have slightly different physiognomies thanks to the rictus of the female figure. The bilongo elements conferring additional powers to this tribal art object named nkisi were housed in the reliquary-forming cup on the woman's abdomen. The metal reputed to hold protective virtues is present in the form of nails dotting the sculpture. Satin patina, granular residue. The witch doctors nganga , both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God called Nzambi through these consecrated figures. Aggressive witchcraft kindoki is the absolute evil that must be fought. To this end, protective nkisis figures are made and loaded by the nganga with all the ingredients necessary to ...

Bembe Biteki figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bembe figure

Established on the plateaus of the People's Republic of Congo ex.Brazzaville, and not to be confused with the Bembe group of northern Lake Tanganinyika, the small group Babembé, Béembé, was influenced by the Téké rites and culture, but especially by that of the Kongos. Settled in the current Republic of Congo, the Béembé originally formed the kingdom of Kongo, with the Vili, Yombé, Bwendé and Woyo. They were under the tutelage of King ntotela elected by the governors. The trade in ivory, copper and slaves were the main resources of this little-known group until colonization. The head of the village, nga-bula, was responsible for interceding with the ancestors. Hunting being a major activity, the ancestors were invoked through statuettes. These idealized representations of ancestors,kitebi ...


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280.00

Baule Waka Sona statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Baoule colon

This statuette is represented frontally, in a confident posture, hands in the pockets. The oversized feet are joined. Abraded polychrome patina. Some sixty ethnic groups populate the Ivory Coast, including the Baule, in the center, Akans from Ghana, people of the savannah, practicing hunting and agriculture just like the Gouro from whom they borrowed ritual cults and sculpted masks. Two types of statues are produced by the Baoulé, Baulé, within the ritual framework: The Waka-Sona statues, "being of wood" in Baoulé, evoke an assié oussou, being of the earth. They are part of a type of statues intended to be used as a medium tool by the komien diviners, the latter being selected by the asye usu spirits in order to communicate revelations from the beyond. The second type of ...


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160.00

Colon Baoule figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Baoule figure

Western influences in African artbaoulé .
Commonly called "colon" but sometimes however embodying a type of "ideal spouse" according to individual criteria, this male figure, coated with a softened polychrome patina, is depicted in Western garb(African Art Western Eyes, Baule", Vogel, p.253 to 257). Two types of statues are produced by the Baule in the ritual context: Waka-Sona statues, "being of wood" in Baule, evoke an assié oussou, being of the earth. They are part of a type of statues intended to be used as a medium tool by the diviners komien, the latter being selected by the spirits asye usu in order to communicate revelations from the beyond. The second type of statues, made according to the indications of the diviner, are the spouses of the afterlife, male, the Blolo bian ...


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160.00

Banja, Mbanza, Banga figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bandja figure

Graphic face formed by vertical sections divided by the nasal bridge. The rounded back encompasses the arms that run along the bust, a specificity of the ubanguienne region. The functions of these statuettes are comparable to those of the Ngbaka of the Mani-Yanda society, within the framework of therapeutic rites or in preparation before the hunts. Golden brown satin patina. Desication crack on the face.
The banda group, Mbanza, Mabanja, or Banza, made up of about fifty sub-groups, dispersed in Sudan, southern Chad, the Central African Republic, and the North-West of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has various initiatory associations dedicated to spirits and uses sculptures. Banda sculptural traditions have influenced the ethnic groups of Ubangui, Zande, Ngbandi, ...


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180.00

Rungu/Bembaminine Luba/Zela ancestor figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Rungu figure

Stocky morphology around a curved bust for this male figure whose face is free from scarified patterns. Glossy patina, long desiccation cracks.
A tribe of the Tabwa group, the Rungu are established in an area between the R.D.C. (Democratic Republic of Congo), Zambia and Tanzania. Under the influence of the neighboring Lubas and Bemba, the Rungu produced prestigious objects intended for dignitaries, stools, combs, spoons and scepters, frequently decorated with figures of couples or twins evoking the primordial ancestors. Their king, called mwéné tafuna , lives in Zambia. A women's association, Kamanya , has dolls like those of the Tabwas.





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