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African art - Statues:

Often the work of blacksmiths who work on soft woods, African statuary includes statues of ancestors, dolls, statuettes of twins. All these statues offer geometric forms with angular contours, elongated features, sometimes with a severe expression. The arms can be glued to the body, or on the contrary, they can move away from it. We find seated or standing figures, arms and knees bent or as with the Dogon Tellem, arms raised towards the sky imploring for the coming of rain. The statues can also be used as fetishes for all sorts of animist practices, mainly in the Congo. Some are made of bronze as in the Benin kingdom. For the traditional African, their function is to make invisible realities visible.


Lwena figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lwena figure

This Chokwe or Lwena statuette, associated with the Hamba type therapeutic cult, embodies a female ancestor. These figures were arranged around the muyombo altar, a tree at the foot of which sacrifices and offerings were once made. Sculptures made in sticks or poles (Mbunji or mbanji) planted in the ground were also associated with it. The related ethnic groups had this same type of altar, a witness before which rituals, oaths and important transactions were concluded.
Beautiful abraded dark brown patina, desication cracks. Of Lunda origin, the Lwena emigrated from Angola to Zaire in the 19th century, repulsed by the Chokwe. When some became slave traders, others, the Lovale, found refuge in Zambia. Their society is matrilineal, exogamous and polygamous. The Lwena became known for ...


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240.00

Lwena statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lwena statue

Carved from dense wood, this protective female figure is said to be associated with the mythical ancestor and to intervene in human fertility, land fertility, and successful hunts. The face forms a miniature replica of the powerful mukishi wa pwo nyi cijingo ca tangwa mask topped with the kambu ja tota. ("Chokwe and Their Bantu Neighbours" Rodrigues de Areia.) br> Brown satin patina. Abrasions, cracks.
br>Originally Lunda, the Lwena , Luena, emigrated from Angola to Zaire in the 19th century, pushed out by the Chokwe. When some became slave traders, others, the Lovale, found refuge in Zambia. Their society is matrilineal, exogamous and polygamous. The Lwena became known for their sculptures embodying figures of deceased ancestors and chiefs, and their masks related to the ...


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240.00

Luntu Mortar
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Luntu Mortar

Luntu type caryatid mortar intended for healers. The crouching subject is a recurring motif among the Luntu, as among the Lulua for whom this theme forms a protection.
Shiny two-tone patina, discreet cracks. Of Luba origin, the Luntu left the Luba-Kasaï territory to settle among the Lulua in Kasaï in the Democratic Republic of Congo, after having pushed back the Twa pygmies. Luntu culture is imbued with influences from their neighbors Lulua, Songye and Kuba. The powerful Leopard society counterbalances the traditional power of the mfumu chief and judge, who holds his authority from the Luba.


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290.00

Mossi Doll
African art > African Dolls > Mossi Doll

This schematic sculpture, whose appearance of the head varies depending on the region, represents a spirit with whom a relationship is established. The element falling in front of the face evokes the braid worn by little girls, the incisions and scarifications of the ethnic group. Glossy dark patina.
Among many ethnic groups, the search for fertility is done through initiation rites. Wooden figures will be carved, some reflecting both genders, in many cases covered with beads and clothing. During the period of seclusion, the doll, which becomes a child who requires to be fed, washed and anointed daily, becomes the girl's only companion. After the initiation, they will be carried on the women's backs, or attached to their necks. Wooden dolls (biiga), carved in their free time by ...


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180.00

Hopi Doll
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Hopi Doll

French collection of tribal art , the identity of the collector will be communicated to the purchaser.
Colorful witnesses of the traditions of the Hopi Indian peoples of Arizona, the Katsinam sculpted objects (sing. Kachina ) are expressed during traditional dances accompanying the annual festivals in favor of rain. Traditional Katsinam dolls are, for the Pueblo Native American group (Hopi, Zuni, Tewa Village, Acoma Pueblo and Laguna Pueblo), educational tools offered to children at the end of ritual festivals. These Hopi-inspired statuettes, embodying a great diversity of spirits, represent the Katsinam dancers and the colors are associated with the cardinal points. Matte and velvety polychrome patina, abrasions.


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290.00

Teke fetish
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Teke fetish

Ex-Belgian collection of African art In the very diverse teke statuary, bundzi fetishes are associated with the hunting that they are supposed to promote. While some belonged to the clan, others were dedicated to private use. Around the neck of this heavy ancestor effigy hang protective amulets in the form of sculpted miniatures. Shiny dark patina.
Established between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized into chiefdoms whose leader was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu, had the right of life or death over his family, the importance of which determined his prestige. The head of the clan, ngantsié, kept the great protective fetish tar mantsié which supervised all the ceremonies. It was also according to the ...


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280.00

Lulua figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lulua figure

De verschillende soorten Afrikaanse beelden Luluwa, Lulua of Béna Lulua, met meerdere scarificaties, verheerlijken lokale leiders, moederschap, vruchtbaarheid en de vrouwelijke figuur. Dit Afrikaanse moederschap wordt in verband gebracht met de Buanga bua cibola-cultus en zou volgens de Lulua kinderen en zwangere vrouwen beschermen. Het personage benadrukt een prominente buik, het centrum van het lichaam en "object van alle zorg" (De kracht van het heilige, M.Faïk-Nzuji) Grijsbruin patina.
Het is in het zuiden van de Democratische Republiek Congo dat de Lulua, of Béna Lulua, uit West-Afrika zich vestigden. . Hun sociale structuur, gebaseerd op kaste, is vergelijkbaar met die van de Luba. Ze produceerden weinig maskers, maar meestal beeldjes van voorouders die de ideale ...


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140.00

Lulua statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lulua statue

The different types of Luluwa, Lulua, or even Bena Lulua statues, with multiple scarifications, glorify local chiefs, maternity, fertility and the female figure. The statuettes of this type belong to the Buanga bua cibola cult, and are supposed to protect children and pregnant women. By the position of the hands in fact, this figure highlights a prominent abdomen, the center of the body and "object of all solicitudes" (The power of the sacred , M. Faïk-Nzuji ) Prominent scarifications adorn her body. Satin patina.
It was in the south of the Democratic Republic of the Congo that the Lulua , or Béna Lulua ,from West Africa settled. Their social structure, based on castes, is similar to that of the Luba. They produced few masks, but mostly statues of ancestors representing ...


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140.00

Lulua fetish
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Lulua fetish

Ex-French collection of African art Among the Luluwa, Lulua, or even Béna Lulua, various types of African statues presenting multiple scarifications, glorify local chiefs, motherhood, fertility and the female figure. This interesting version with a magical charge was also sculpted among the Luba of Kasai. This type of statuette depends on the Buanga bua cibola cult with the aim of protecting children and pregnant women. The subject has an umbilical hernia, the abdomen being the center of the body and "object of all concerns" (The power of the sacred, M. Faïk-Nzuji) Very slightly abraded dark brown patina.
It is in the south of the Democratic Republic of Congo that the Lulua, or Béna Lulua, from West Africa, settled . Their social structure, based on castes, is similar to that of ...


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290.00

Songye figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Songye figure

Anthropomorphic figure with a striated face like the masks of the kifwebe. Satin patina, desiccation cracks.
In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle on the left bank of the Lualaba, in Katanga and Kasai. Their society is organized in a patriarchal way. Their history is inseparable from that of the Luba, to whom they are related through common ancestors. Very present in their society, divination made it possible to discover sorcerers and to shed light on the causes of the misfortunes that struck individuals. The masked performances of male masks provided an opportunity to carry out punitive expeditions and maintain social order. The female masks, supposed to be equipped with divinatory faculties, activated by their dances the benevolent spirits. ...


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240.00

Chamba sculpture
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Chamba sculpture

French collection of African art
The delicately striated face topped with a headdress resembling a helmet distinguish this sculpture whose powerful anatomy forms the specificity of the Benoué valley.
Black patina rubbed with light clay.
Minor cracks. Established since the 17th century on the south bank of the Benue in Nigeria, the Chamba resisted attempted conquests by the Fulani, nomads who settled in large numbers in northern Nigeria. They are known for their famous buffalo mask with its two flat jaws extending from the head. Statuary, less common, is admired by lovers of primitive forms.


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380.00

Baule statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Baule statue

Placed on a circular base, hands behind the back, the male figure, head turned, offers integumentary ornaments testifying to the Baoulé concept of beauty, constant in African art.
Glossy black patina.
Desiccation cracks.
Around sixty ethnic groups populate Ivory Coast, including the Baoulé, in the center, Akans from Ghana, a people of the savannah, practicing hunting and agriculture just like the Gouro from whom they borrowed their ritual cults and masks. carved. Two types of statues are produced by the Baoulé, Baulé, in the ritual context: The Waka-Sona statues, "being of wood" in baoulé, evoke an assié oussou, being of the earth. They are part of a type of statue intended to be used as a medium tool by the komien diviners, the latter being selected by the asye ...


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240.00

Bamana Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bamana Statue

Ex-French collection of African art. African statue named "little favorite", Nyeleni in Bambara, whose sculpted curves traditionally evoke fertility. Brown, matte patina, rubbed with ocher. Erosions and desiccation cracks.
The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and the Malinke. Large masked festivals close the initiation rites of the dyo association and the gwan ritual of the Bambara in the south of the Bambara country. Spread over a period of seven years for men, they are less demanding for women. The new initiates then celebrate, in groups, from village to village, their symbolic rebirth. It is the sons of the blacksmiths who dance around these statues which were placed outside the festivities grouped together on an ...


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490.00

Bwende statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bwende statue

Belgian collection ofAfrican art.
African statue depicting an ancestor with ritual calabashes. Thick kaolin patina. Abrasions.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by King Ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary with codified gestures in relation to their vision of the world. The Bwendé sculptures were strongly inspired by those of the neighboring Beembé. Some of their sculptures, as among the Bakongo, were magical objects minkisi comprising nails and which were equipped with orifices in which medicines, bilongo, or relics of ancestors, were introduced.


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350.00

Dan Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Dan Statue

Ex-Bekge collection of African art Characteristic of Dan statuary from Ivory Coast , scarified body motifs, such as those adorning the bust of this female Dan figure. The traditional criteria of beauty, headdress organized in braided shells, ringed neck, and beaded adornments complete the distinctive elements of the dan statues. Satin black patina, abrasions.
Gifts of women, food, festive ceremonies and honorable status once rewarded Dan sculptors to whom this talent was granted during a dream. The latter constituted the means of communication of Du, invisible spiritual power, with men. The statuary, rare, held a prestigious role for its owner. These are mainly effigies of wives, lü mä , wooden human beings. These are not incarnations of spirits or effigies of ancestors, but ...


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180.00

Songye Skeleton
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Songye Skeleton

African statue of Songye or Luba origin representing a skeleton, and whose function remains undetermined.
Satin black patina.
The Songye fetish, magical sculpture Nkisi, nkishi (pl. mankishi), plays the role of mediator between gods and men. Large examples are the collective property of an entire village, while smaller figures belong to an individual or family. In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle in Kasai, Katanga and South Kivu. Their society is organized in a patriarchal way. Their history is inseparable from that of the Luba to whom they are related through common ancestors. Very present in their society, divination made it possible to discover sorcerers and to shed light on the causes of the misfortunes which struck ...


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290.00

Doogn rider
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Doogn rider

Ex. French collection of African art.
The rider and his horse, a theme frequently treated among the Dogon of Mali, appears here in the form of a sculpture coated with a thick dark crust, partially cracked.
In Dogon mythology, one of the Nommos, ancestors of men resurrected by the creator god Amma, descended to earth carried by an ark transformed into a horse. In addition, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious leader named Hogon, paraded on his mount during his enthronement because according to custom he should not set foot on the ground. In the region of the Sangha cliffs, inaccessible on horseback, the priests wore it, while neighing in reference to the mythical ancestor Nommo.


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490.00

Namji Doll
African art > African Dolls > Namji Doll

Belgian collection of African tribal art. The dolls of the Namji or Dowayo , a people of animist mountain people living in the north of Cameroon, are stylized figures, decorated with decorative accessories. This example is dressed in glass beads, textiles and animal skin, cowrie shells extend the arms. Satin brown patina, erosions. These African tribal dolls are carved in wood by the blacksmith, initially for little girls' play. But these dolls are mainly used by infertile women in complex fertility rituals, the doll becoming a surrogate child that they will treat as such. In some cases the fiancé offered it to his future wife, the doll representing their future offspring. The decoration of the doll can also reproduce the attires of the new initiates after their period of seclusion.


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290.00

Songye Fetish
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Songye Fetish

Collection belge d' art africain .
Statuette africaine Nkisi , nkishi (pl. mankishi )des Songye, offrant des traits géométriques à l'image du masque kifwebe. Les bras sont positionnés autour d'un abdomen saillant pointant au-dessus d'un pagne de raphia, et libèrent un espace pour y glisser des crochets métalliques comme le dictait l'usage. Patine brune huilée, abrasions.
Le Nkisi joue le rôle de médiateur entre dieu et les hommes, chargé de protéger contre différents maux. Les exemplaires de grande taille sont la propriété collective de tout un village, et les figures plus réduites appartiennent à un individu ou une famille. Au XVIème siècle, les Songyes migrèrent de la région du Shaba pour s'établir sur la rive gauche de la Lualaba. Leur société est organisée de façon ...


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290.00

Moba Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Moba Statue

French collection of tribal art These Tchicheri, or cicilg, present themselves to us either in reduced forms intended for the family altar, or in the form of personal talisman, the yendu tchicheri. Only the sons of diviners were authorized to sculpt this protective effigy. In West Africa, the tchitcheri sakab (pl. of Tchicherik) embody a founding ancestor of the clan. This crude-looking sculpted figure, devoid of features and now eroded and furrowed, was initially planted in the earth.
The mediating object is supposed to increase the magical power of the family or community altar. Light patina, dark drips.

Lit. : "The soul of Africa", S. Diakonoff.; “Africa” Ed. Prestel; “The Ewa and Yves Develon African Collection” Musée des Confluences.


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380.00

Fanti doll
African art > African Dolls > Fanti doll

Collection of African art by the painter A. Plaza Garcès African art Fanti, Fante, is best known for its fertility dolls which are carried by pregnant women, who must not lay their eyes on a malformed being or object, for fear that their children will resemble them. On the other hand, looking at these dolls, expressions of idealized beauty, they are supposed to promote the beauty of their future children. These dolls sculpted by the Fante, an Akan population from the coastal regions of Ghana, the former Gold Coast, have a slightly different appearance from those of the Ashanti. However, their function is more or less similar. The head here adopts a rectangular shape. We find the ringed neck surmounting a tubular body devoid of limbs. Glossy brown patina, desication crack.


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150.00





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