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African art - Statues:

Often the work of blacksmiths who work on soft woods, African statuary includes statues of ancestors, dolls, statuettes of twins. All these statues offer geometric forms with angular contours, elongated features, sometimes with a severe expression. The arms can be glued to the body, or on the contrary, they can move away from it. We find seated or standing figures, arms and knees bent or as with the Dogon Tellem, arms raised towards the sky imploring for the coming of rain. The statues can also be used as fetishes for all sorts of animist practices, mainly in the Congo. Some are made of bronze as in the Benin kingdom. For the traditional African, their function is to make invisible realities visible.


Statue Metoko
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Metoko

Ex-collection of Belgian African art.
It is during initiatory rites that this figure appeared accompanied by its male complement Ntanda. In addition, they welcomed the souls of the recently deceased before their departure to the afterlife, and were then abandoned in the forest. Lozenge patterns punctuate the matt surface. Erosions and cracks.
The Metoko and the Lengola, whose ritual sculptures are very close, are peoples of the primary forest dedicated to the worship of a single God, monotheism rare in Africa. Their society comprising three grades, the Bukota, structured daily life and welcomed both men and women. It represents the equivalent of the Bwami association of the Lega. The sculptures played a role during initiation ceremonies, and were then placed on the graves ...


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240.00

Songye fetish
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Songye fetish

British Traditional African Art Collection.
Among the wide range of Songye sculptures, details distinguish this Songye statuette such as the horn inserted into the head at the tip, and the tiny metal crown at the top. The magic power of the bankishi, (sing. Nkishi) is supposed to be reinforced thanks to the addition of accessories, talismans, metallic elements, seeds, shells. The abdominal cavity is filled with a magical charge that can be made up of therapeutic ingredients. Glossy patina, desication cracks.
In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle on the left bank of the Lualaba. Their society is organized in a patriarchal way. Their history is inseparable from that of the Luba to which they are related through common ancestors.
Very ...


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290.00

Bwende Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bwende Statue

Embodying the spirit of an ancestor, this African statue presents keloidal motifs testifying to the successive stages of initiation to which the individual was subjected. The look is sometimes set with ivory, earthenware, or bone. Black-brown patina, kaolin residue.

The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by King Ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary with codified gestures in relation to their vision of the world. The Bwendé sculptures were strongly inspired by those of the neighboring Beembé. The village leader, nga-bula, was responsible for interceding with the ...


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280.00

Hemba Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Hemba Statue

Janiform fetish sculpture kabeja, also used among the Luba, and among the Kasongo who call them kakuji. The top is hollowed out in order to receive the bijimba, a load composed of magical elements from the natural, human and plant environment. Each clan had a kabeji sculpture intended for protection and healing. But this type of fetish could also be reserved for individual use. Grainy matte patina, drying cracks.
The Hemba form a subgroup of the Luba ethnic group living in the southeast of DR Congo, east of the Lualaba River, and are especially renowned for their singiti statuary representing chiefs . Formerly under the domination of the Luba, these farmers and hunters practiced ancestor worship by means of effigies long attributed to the Luba. Their society brings together ...


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190.00

Vere Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Vere Bronze

Ex-collection of African art from a Parisian gallery owner whose identity will be communicated to the buyer.
Pair of African bronzes depicting a couple with objects, in a dynamic posture. One of the male subject's feet is placed on that of his partner, as if to curb the momentum of the second subject. The bodies are streaked with scarifications. Irregular black patina, chips, residual verdigris pigments.
The Vere, Verre , Were, Duru-Verre, or even Dii, live in the northeast of Nigeria, in the state of Adamawa (former Gongola), and in the north of Cameroon. This very small population lives in circular huts grouped into fortified villages.
The Vere statuettes, whose function remains unknown, are rare, and present analogies with the works produced by the Mumuye, ...


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380.00

Zande Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Zande Statuette

African art counts among the Azande statues: The Kudu statues representing ancestors, and the Yanda statues of animal or human form, having an apotropaic role, exhibited during divinatory rites during the rituals of the society Mani. Yanda type, this Zande ritual charm offers a rough old patina. Slight cracks.
Formerly referred to as "Niam-Niam" because they are considered anthropophagic, the tribes grouped under the name of Zande, Azandé, settled, coming from Chad, on the border of the DRC (Zaire), Sudan and the Central African Republic. According to their beliefs, man is endowed with two souls, one of which is transformed upon his death into an animal totem of the clan to which he belongs. The Yanda statuettes were exhibited during divinatory sessions during which the head ...


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280.00

Songye Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Songye Statuette

Carved subject, Nkisi, nkishi (pl. mankishi). The substances making up the magical charge bishimba were introduced into the cavity of the skull if the abdomen did not have them. This miniature variant made it possible to keep it with you when traveling. Matte light brown patina rubbed with ocher. Eroded base.
These protective fetishes intended for homes come in diverse styles in the many chiefdoms of the Songye country. The Nkisi plays the role of mediator between gods and men. The large examples are the collective property of an entire village, the smaller figures are for private use.
In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle on the left bank of the Lualaba. Their society is organized in a patriarchal way. Their history is inseparable from that ...


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150.00

Kusu figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kusu figure

Unlike the Janiform Kabeja figures, this female statuette of the Lubaisé Kusus, probably linked to fertility rituals, is the incarnation of an ancestor. It was in fact under the Hemba influence in particular that the cult of ancestors was supported by statuary evoking heroes or chiefs, or the mythical ancestor Soba. Greyish black patina, slightly satin-like.
Damaged base.


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190.00

Kusu figure
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Kusu figure

Individual protection figures such as ours, used by the Hemba and the Kusu, were inspired by Songye fetishes. The magic charge, composed of ingredients of various origins, was inserted at the top of the head where an orifice remains.
Irregular satin patina, erosions and gaps at the base. The Kusu established on the left bank of the Lualaba have borrowed the artistic traditions of the Luba and the Hemba and have a caste system similar to that of the Luba.
The Hemba for their part settled in the south-east of Zaire, on the right bank of the Lualaba. Formerly under the domination of the Luba, these farmers and hunters practice ancestor worship by means of effigies long attributed to the Luba. The singiti statues were kept by the fumu mwalo and honored during ceremonies ...


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190.00

Baule Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Baule Statuette

Ex-French collection of African art.
This ancient African statuette, often described as a "settler" , forms, for the Baoulé, an idealized, individual image of the celestial spouse. Its features were carved on the diviner's instructions for his client in an attempt to resolve various problems.

Matte polychrome patina. Presence of erosions around the base.
Two types of statues are produced by the Baoulé in the ritual context: TheWaka-Sona statues, "being of wood" in Baoulé, evoke an assié oussou, being of the earth. They are part of a type of statue intended to be used as a medium tool by the komien diviners, the latter being selected by the asye usu spirits in order to communicate revelations from the beyond. The second type of statues, made according to ...


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290.00

Rungu Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Rungu Statuette

Small African sculpture kneeling. Grainy, lustrous, grayish-brown patina.
Formerly subject to the Luba, then to the Lundas, the Zela adopted a large part of their uses and traditions. Established between the Luvua River and Lake Kisalé, they are today organized into four chiefdoms under the supervision of leaders of Luba origin. They venerate a primordial couple frequently represented in statuary, mythical ancestors, and make offerings to the spirits of nature. Ref. : “Luba” 5 Continents. Rooberts; “Kifwebe” F. Neyt, ed. 5Continents.


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180.00

Lega Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lega Statue

African art and initiation materials to Bwami among the Lega.
African tribal sculpture of the Lega Sakimatwematwe type (Multi-heads) intended, among the many others used throughout the initiations, for an initiate of the Bwami. This statue, around which faces with different physiognomies are superimposed, will stand out not only for the unusual nature of its structure but also for its powerful symbolism. The teacher guided the aspirant to a place where masks and statuettes were exhibited, and it was through attentive observation that the future initiate had to guess the more or less complex meaning of these metaphors, the latter referring largely to proverbs and sayings. Those who were not allowed to see the object, in order to be protected from it, had to undergo costly ...


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160.00

Boa figurines
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Boa figurines

Close to the Mangbetu and Zande, the Boa the savannah in the north of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Their anthropomorphic figures were probably used in rituals to combat the witchcraft of ndoki society . A certain assurance emanates from the attitude of this character firmly established on his legs apart. The dorsal rib extends to a tip buttock. The treatment of the limbs, in crenellation, is sometimes also found in the statuary of the neighbouring Ubangi region. Black brown patina with mahogany highlights, matte residual inlays. White pigments. Erosion on the inner part of a leg.

They are known for their masks with oversized ears, perforated as the pavilions of the ears of the eastern Boa, the bavobongo. It gave an impressive appearance to its wearer, accentuated by the ...


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180.00

Statuette Holo
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statuette Holo

This female statuette, dressed in a simple textile loincloth, bears an animal motif carved in round-bump at the top of the head, visibly a mammal, like the masks used by the ethnic group. These figures, which are divided into antelope, bird, monkey, refer to tales or proverbs, and the behaviors of the dancer reflect that of the animal represented. Mate grey brown patina, with abraded areas.
br-Located in the Democratic Congo between the Yaka and the Chukwe of Angola, the small Holo ethnic group migrated from the Angolan coast to settle near the banks of the Kwango River. Hunting and agriculture provide for their livelihoods. Neighbouring ethnic groups, such as the Suku and Yaka, influenced their traditional sculptures. The Holo have indeed produced masks and prestigious objects for ...


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180.00

Statues League
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statues League

This zoomorphic figure has a whitewashed hearted face reminiscent of the Lega masks. Among the productions of their neighbours Zimba, inspired by the Luba and Lega traditions, rare Simian statuettes were also used in the similar rites of Bwami. This kind of figure would refer to a proverb alone known to insiders. Particularly satiny dark patina, abrasions and crack on the head.
The tribal art of the Lega, Balega, or Warega, is distinguished by its initiation statuettes, also made of ivory, some of which were kept in a basket for the highest ranks of the Bwami of different communities. This type of tribal art statuette Iginga ( Maginga in the plural), was the property of the high-ranking officers of the Bwami, a secret society that admits men and their wives, and governs social ...


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280.00

Mangbetu Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Mangbetu Statuette

The lines on this Mangbetu statuette recall the body paintings and scarifications of the group, such as those of the Asua pygmies with whom the tribe maintained relations. These varied depending on the circumstances. The oblong hairstyle was worn by the Mangbetu because from a very young age, children underwent compression of the skull using raffia ties. Later, the Mangbetu “knit” their hair on wicker strands and applied a headband to the forehead in order to extract the hair so as to accentuate the elongation of the head. Satin brown patina.
The ancients call beli these figures of ancestors stored out of sight and comparable to those belonging to their secret society nebeli.
Established in the forest in the northeast of Zaire, the Mangbetu kingdom expressed itself through ...


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280.00

Senoufo Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Senoufo Statuette

Senoufo decorative sculpture depicting a female subject. This statuette displays the crest and traditional incisions of the group. Smooth oiled patina, slight crack along one ear.
The Senoufo, a name given to them by French settlers, are mainly made up of farmers who have dispersed between Mali, Ivory Coast, and Burkina Faso. Governed by matrilineal traditions, they are made up of clusters of dwellings called katiolo. Each of them has its own Poro association which introduces young boys from the age of seven in a succession of three cycles lasting seven years. Living in a reserved neighborhood, the sénufo sculptor, whose training spanned seven years, began with the creation of everyday objects, then, little by little, produced sculptures larger than more important.


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100.00

Bwende Doll
African art > African Dolls > Bwende Doll

Belgian collection of African art.
Reduced figure of the niombo, sometimes giant anthropomorphic funerary "package", representing the deceased, buried during funerals during ancestor cults. The doll is made of a basketwork frame covered in textile. It was kept in the chiefs' house.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by King Ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary with codified gestures in relation to their vision of the world. The Bwendé sculptures were strongly inspired by those of the neighboring Beembé.


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450.00

Figure Ikenga
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Figure Ikenga

Most often sporting a high horned headdress with complex elements, this type of African statues features a character with attributes such as jewelry and scarifications, sitting on a stool. The warrior brandishes a knife and a human head. On its white clay bleached bust, darker zoomorphic patterns are drawn.
Patine grainy mate. A few marks of xylophages.
This ethnic group is located in the southern Niger Delta region of Nigeria. the Ikenga is a personal altar belonging to a man. It is the symbol of accomplishment and personal success (okpossi), the representation of one's tutelary spirit (chi, vital energy), as well as the recipient of sacrifices offered periodically or prior to the commitment of an important action (most often to ifejioku, deity of the yam, or to ale, goddess ...


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290.00

Pfemba Maternity
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Pfemba Maternity

Figurative tribal sculpture of the Kongo , this female effigy embodies the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure, evidenced by the scarifications of the bust. The child within embodies the matrilineal transmission of power. The Yombe adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, with diamonds in relation to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The mouth reveals traditionally lined teeth, the eyes seem exorbitant, underlining the ancestor's ability to discern occult things. The use of this type of sculpture remains unknown. Black patina, few cracks.
Clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternity. The use of this type of sculpture remains ...


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280.00

Statue Gouro
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Gouro

This statue was displayed on the heads of dancers during parties or kept on an altar for divinatory purpose. The fleshy, semi-resped lower limbs form one of the specificities of the sculptural expression of the region. The abdomen is shared by a large scarred band still impregnated with white pigments, the residue of which is tiny on the face and the folds of the neck. The facial features are reminiscent of the masks of the neighboring Dans. Brand of opulence, ringed neck top. Shards on one ear and a breast. Nice rare piece. Cracked base with native restoration.
Organized in lineages, the Gouros are the western neighbours of the Baoulé in the west of the Middle Sassandra, whose sculpture they inspired. Priest and soothsayer share the predominant ritual functions among the Guro. The ...


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350.00





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