...
Search option




Discover our exceptionnal items

African art - Statues:

Often the work of blacksmiths who work on soft woods, African statuary includes statues of ancestors, dolls, statuettes of twins. All these statues offer geometric forms with angular contours, elongated features, sometimes with a severe expression. The arms can be glued to the body, or on the contrary, they can move away from it. We find seated or standing figures, arms and knees bent or as with the Dogon Tellem, arms raised towards the sky imploring for the coming of rain. The statues can also be used as fetishes for all sorts of animist practices, mainly in the Congo. Some are made of bronze as in the Benin kingdom. For the traditional African, their function is to make invisible realities visible.


Chokwe Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Chokwe Statuette

Symbol of power, this African statuette glorifies the ancestor and mythical hero founder of the ethnic group, Chibinda Ilunga. The chiefs had a major function in the rites of propitiation intended for the hunt and the fertility of women. Applications of castor oil and coloring vegetable decoctions were generally administered to the surface.
Breakage (arm and base).

Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwé were then subjected to the Lunda empire from which they inherited a new hierarchical system and the sacredness of power. Three centuries later, they ended up seizing the capital of the Lunda weakened by internal conflicts, thus contributing to the dismantling of the kingdom. The Chokwé did not have centralized power but large ...


View details

280.00

Bambara Statue
Sold item
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bambara Statue

Seated female subject, offering an emaciated face surmounted by an elaborate braided headdress. Shoulders are born a chest "in shell", the narrow bust is framed by long arms whose hands rest on the knees. The bust is covered with scarifications. Clear matte patina, erosions, lacks and cracks.
The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and the Malinke. Large masked parties close the initiation rites of the dyo association and the gwan ritual of the Bambara in the south of the Bambara country. Spread over a period of seven years for men, they are less demanding for women. The new initiates then celebrate, in groups, from village to village, their symbolic rebirth. It is the sons of the blacksmiths who dance around these statues ...


View details

Sold

Luba statue
Sold item
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Luba statue

Harmonious shapes and posture associated with fertility and royal secrets for this statuette. This attitude indicates that the secrets of royalty, bizila, belong to women thanks to their role as political and spiritual intermediaries. The hairstyle was made of braids and copper wires. The so-called "ear-shaped" scarifications, "tactile mnemonic code", are recurrent. This type of figure was also used in the context of fertility rituals: young women lacking breast milk came to touch the chest of the statue in the hope of breastfeeding more abundantly.

Oiled patina.
The Luba (Baluba in Chiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu river, thus the name (Baluba, which means “the Lubas”). The Luba have two main ...


View details

Sold

Luguru statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Luguru statue

African sculpture from the area around Dar-es-Salam, on the coast of Tanzania, where the Kaguru, Luguru, Kwéré, Zaramo and Doé tribes live. Carved in dense wood, this figure depicts a female figure carrying a child in her arms. The realistic features are slightly asymmetrical, the pupils deeply sunken, and the caps are pushed back. The protruding, disproportionate ears are cut obliquely. One arm of the child is missing. Matte patina of use, grainy residual encrustations, drippings from libations. Desication cracks.


View details

380.00

Luba statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Luba statue

Represented in a posture associated with fertility and royalty, this African sculpture indicates that the secrets of royalty, bizila belong to women thanks to their role as political intermediaries and spiritual. The hairstyle was made of braids and copper wires. The so-called "ear-shaped" scarifications, "tactile mnemonic code", are recurrent. This type of figure was also used in the context of fertility rituals: young women lacking breast milk came to touch the chest of the statue in the hope of breastfeeding more abundantly.

Filmy patina, desication cracks.
The Luba (Baluba in Chiluba) are a people of Central Africa. Their cradle is Katanga, more precisely the region of the Lubu River, thus the name (Baluba, which means “the Lubas”). The Luba have two main types ...


View details

190.00

Kusu fetish
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kusu fetish

Individual protection figures such as ours, used by the Hemba and the Kusu, were inspired by Songye fetishes. The magic charge, composed of ingredients of various origins, was inserted at the top of the head where an orifice remains.
Light brown patina, erosions and desication cracks.
The Kusu established on the left bank of the Lualaba have borrowed the artistic traditions of the Luba and the Hemba and have a caste system similar to that of the Luba.
The singiti statues were kept by the fumu mwalo and honored during ceremonies during which sacrifices were offered to them. Along with the authority of the hereditary chiefs, secret societies, male such as the bukazanzi, and female, the bukibilo, played a major role within the clan.


View details

140.00

Kusufetish
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kusufetish

Statuette equipped with a receptacle for a ritual charge, and whose characteristics recall the fetishes of the Songye. Golden brown satin patina, cracks and chips.
The Kusu established on the left bank of the Lualaba have borrowed the artistic traditions of the Luba and the Hemba and have a caste system similar to that Luba . In this region, between the Bembe, Boyo, Hemba, Songye and Tetela, ritual objects were subject to stylistic exchanges and influences. We note here a similarity with Songye fetishes. The singiti statues were kept by the fumu mwalo and honored during ceremonies during which sacrifices were offered to them. Alongside the authority of the hereditary chiefs, secret societies, masculine such as the bukazanzi, and feminine, the bukibilo, played a major role ...


View details

140.00

Teke statue
Sold item
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Teke statue

Statue biteke (sculpted figure) embodying an ancestor of the clan. His hollow bust must have housed the magical charge called " Bonga " or "bilongo", which was generally fixed or concealed by a textile. This symbolism refers to the Téké belief that the abdomen conceals wisdom. These fetishes were placed on the altars of the chiefs.
Matte patina.
Established between the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Republic of the Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized into chiefdoms, the chief of which was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right of life or death over his family, the importance of which determined his prestige. The chief of the clan, ngantsié , kept the great protective fetish tar mantsié which ...


View details


Sold for 150.00 Find similar item

Kissi stone
African art > Monolith, megalith, cross river, nkoro, african art > Kissi stone

Ex.Jacques Anquetil collection "Africa, the hands of the world" by J .Anquetil, ed. Solar ) by Jacques Anquetil , African art collector, actor originally, then initiated to weaving among the Dogon, author of several books.
Among the tribes living in Sierra Leone, Mende and Kissi, mostly rice farmers, worship stone statues dating from the Sapi kingdom. The latter extended, until the 16th century, from Guinea to Liberia. The Temné organized themselves into chiefdoms headed by a supreme chief. The ragbenle or mneke society, responsible for fertility, intervened when the chief died. The bundu ...


View details

290.00

Ngbandi figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ngbandi figure

A faceted face with a protruding chin, offering the traditional striations punctuating the nasal bridge, and a small figure with truncated arms, separated from the crater bust carried by ringed legs. Oiled patina, nuanced, reddish brown.
The many carved objects are, among the Ngandi, related to hunting and magic. Some represent the Ngbirondo spirit and act as guardians of the village.
Funerary statues were also used, and sculptures of couple yangba and his sister, equivalent to the Seto and Nabo ancestors of the Ngbaka.

The Ngbaka form a homogeneous people in the north-west of the DRC, south of Ubangui. The Ngbandi live in the east (on the left bank of the Oubangui) and the Ngombe in the south. The initiation of young people, "gaza" or "ganza" (which gives ...


View details

280.00

Kongo Fetish
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Kongo Fetish

Protective statuette whose eyes and abdomen are symbolically encrusted with shards of glass. Black satin patina, erosions. Circular metal base.
The Vili , the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembe, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, led by King ntotela . Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary endowed with a codified gesture in relation to their vision of the world. The nganga sorcerers, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God called Nzambi through consecrated figures. To this end, individual protective figures nkisis, to protect against sorcery and various plagues, are made and ...


View details

190.00

Kota Reliquary
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kota Reliquary

This sculpture features a concave face, topped with ample side panels. It is veneered with sheets of gilded metal that discreet studding adheres to the wooden core. The whole is streaked with geometric patterns. The Kota inhabit the eastern part of Gabon, which is rich in iron ore, and some in the Republic of Congo. The blacksmith, in addition to wood carving, made tools for agricultural work as well as ritual weapons. The sculptures, playing the role of "medium" between the living and the dead, who watched over the descendants, were associated with the rites of the bwete, comparable to those of the Fang, and surmounted the reliquary baskets.


View details

390.00

Tikar Statue
Sold item
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Tikar Statue

Relatively rare figure, whose stylized features are drawn in low relief on the oblique plane of the face, and whose reduced limbs bend in a semicircle around the concave bust propelling the umbilicus. Herringbone patterns line the face and bust. Grainy patina with ocher inlays.
The Tikar people inhabit the western part of central Cameroon, which is located within the dense secondary forest of medium altitude, along the Mbam. Within this ecotone, the "tikar plain" (which takes its name from its occupants) constitutes a depression which leans respectively to the west and north to the Mbam massif (and its tributaries Mapé and Kim) and to the first foothills of the Adamaoua plateau. The structure of the kingdom is made up of a large chiefdom subdivided into quarters: the residences of ...


View details

Sold

Tumbwe Statuette
Sold item
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Tumbwe Statuette

The Tabwa ("scarify" and "write") constitute an ethnic group present in the South-East of the DRC, around Lake Tanganyika. The tribes of this region, such as the Tumbwe, worship the mipasi ancestors through sculptures held by chiefs or sorcerers. A magic charge (dawa) was introduced at the top of the head of the statues. Soothsayers-healers used this type of object to reveal witchcraft and protect against malevolent spirits. Perched on a base whose interior has been hollowed out, a female figure is represented seated, naked, her arms hampered by a cord behind her back where a long braid runs. Desication cracks, ocher brown patina.
Simple farmers without centralized power, the Tabwa federated around tribal chiefs after coming under the influence of the Luba. It was mainly during ...


View details

Sold

Zande Statuette
Sold item
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Zande Statuette

African art has two types of Azande statues: The Kudu statues represent ancestors, and the Yanda statues of animal or human form, having an apotropaic role, exhibited during divinatory rites during the rituals of the Mani . Carved yanda figure, flanked by a projecting umbilicus, stubby arms and zizag legs. The face carved with huge concave globes is typical of this type of Zande ritual statuette. Glossy dark patina revealing the grain of the wood. Matte patina of use, abrasions.
Formerly designated under the name "Niam-Niam" because considered as cannibals, the tribes grouped under the name of Zande, Azandé, settled, coming from Chad, on the border of the R.D.C. (Zaire), Sudan and the Central African Republic. According to their beliefs, man is endowed with two souls, one of ...


View details

Sold

Kuba Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kuba Statuette

Ndop type statuette illustrating African art Kuba. Of divine origin for his subjects, the king is represented seated cross-legged. Both head of the kingdom and of the bushoong chiefdom, "nyim", supernatural abilities were attributed to him. He therefore ensured the sustainability of his subjects, whether through harvests, rain or the birth of children.
Orange brown patina. Cracks and minor abrasions.
During the last days of the king's life, the memorial statue was placed at his bedside so that it would capture its vital energy because the object would survive him. According to Cornet (1982), these statues were intended for the widows of the sovereign because after the funeral, the ndop was installed in the harem.
Once the successor to the throne had been designated, he ...


View details

180.00

Bambara Head
Sold item
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bambara Head

TheBamana, like the Dogon, glorify the ancestors like this vestige of a statue, the head of a dignitary wearing the traditional cap, extending laterally with braids. Heavy lowered eyelids breathe a solemn look into the face. Abraded brown patina. Lacks.
Desication cracks.
The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and the Malinke. The Bambara nyamakala artisan groups, more specifically the blacksmiths named numu, are in charge of carving ritual objects, endowed with the nyama , occult energy. Using fire and magic items, they are further assigned the role of healer and diviner. Their powers are transmitted to their wives, who alone have the right to produce the pottery. Six male associations, the Dyow, using Bambara masks, ...


View details

Sold

Tschokwe Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Tschokwe Statuette

Honey-colored ancestor figure, representing a woman without a neck, her arms surrounding a stocky bust. The bony face bears a scarified symbolic motif called kalunga among the Chokwe.
Satin patina, erosions at the top.
Of Lunda origin, the Lwena emigrated from Angola to Zaire in the 19th century, repulsed by the Chokwe. Some, the Lovale, found refuge in Zambia. They became known for their honey-colored sculptures, embodying figures of deceased ancestors and chiefs, and their masks linked to the initiation rites of the mukanda. Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwé were then subjected to the Lunda empire from which they inherited a new hierarchical system and the sacredness of power. The Chokwé did not have centralized power but large ...


View details

150.00

Tabwa Doll
Sold item
African art > African Dolls > Tabwa Doll

Used by the female initiation society, this type of limbless statuette forms a protective charm.
Golden brown patina.
The Tabwa ("scarify" and "write") constitute an ethnic group present in the south-east of the DRC. Simple farmers without centralized power, they federated around tribal chiefs after coming under the influence of the Luba. It was mainly during this period that their artistic current was expressed mainly through statues but also masks. The Tabwa practiced ancestor worship and dedicated some of their statues named mkisi to them. Animists, their beliefs are anchored around the ngulu, spirits of nature present in plants and rocks. The Tabwa also worshiped Bampundu twins.


View details

Sold

Idoma Statue
Sold item
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Idoma Statue

Fragment of African figure from altar. These statues which benefited from offerings were preserved in sanctuaries. The very eroded piece, however, makes it possible to distinguish the traditional facial and body scarifications of the subject, which is represented as lying on a couch, or leaning against it. Dark matte patina revealing light wood.
The Idoma live at the confluence of the Bénué and the Niger. It is often difficult to distinguish their sculpture from that of their Igbo, Cross River and Igala neighbours. Royal lineage members of their oglinye society, glorifying courage, wear masks and crests during funerals and festivities. They also produce white-faced fertility statues. Janiform crests are generally exhibited at the funerals of notables. Members of the male Kwompten ...


View details

Sold

Tabwa Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Tabwa Statuette

Figure of an ancestor from b>African tribal art displaying the facial and body scarifications of the Batabwa clans.
Patina of use smooth and satiny, cracks of desication.
The Tabwa ("scarify" and "write") constitute an ethnic group present in the South-East of the DRC, around Lake Tanganyika. The tribes of this region, such as the Tumbwe, worship the mipasi ancestors through sculptures held by chiefs or sorcerers. A magical charge (dawa) was frequently placed on top of the statues' heads. Soothsayers-healers used this type of object to reveal witchcraft and protect against malevolent spirits. Simple farmers without centralized power, the Tabwa federated around tribal chiefs after coming under the influence of the Luba. Animists, their beliefs are anchored around the ngulu, ...


View details

240.00





Previously viewed items
African art  - 

© 2023 - Digital Consult SPRL

Essentiel Galerie SPRL
73A Rue de Tournai - 7333 Tertre - Belgique
+32 (0)65.529.100
visa Master CardPaypal