...
Search option




Discover our exceptionnal items

African art - Dolls:

Many contemporary commentaries claim that dolls and puppets were introduced to the African continent by the Catholic missions for didactic purposes. However, it is clear that the ancestral tradition of puppet show existed long before the arrival of the missions. African puppets are predominantly used in men's shows, while dolls are used by girls and women.


Zulu doll
African art > African Dolls > Zulu doll

Contemporary artists from South Africa create dolls filled with a multitude of glass beads. Touching and decorative, these works also alternate various metal elements and shells, highlighting the skill and creative sense of their designers.
Some cowries and pearls are missing.
During the 19th century, tribes united to form the group called Zulu, whose local chiefs, led by the king, are called iduma. Their society is that of warriors organized into age groups. It was in 1884 that they were annexed by the English. Skilled in making ornaments, the Zulus work with leather, metal and ceramics, adding feathers and beads. Pearls, while having a protective role, indicate the social situation of those who wear them.


View details

160.00

Mossi doll
African art > African Dolls > Mossi doll

Fertility statuette of very schematic design, the appearance of the head of which varies according to the region. It evokes a spirit with which a relationship is established. The tubular bust, slightly bulging at the level of the abdomen, has a flat chest. The angular, stylized head evokes the female crest hairstyle, the parallel incisions, the scarifications and the braids of the ethnic group. Beautiful heterogeneous brown patina, lustrous, locally abraded. Minimal cracking.
The use of dolls by young African women is not exclusively within the initiatory context. When menstruation begins, the girl is considered a potential mother. In many ethnic groups, the search for fertility is then done by means of initiation rites. Wooden figures will then be carved, some reflecting both ...


View details

160.00

beaded doll
African art > African Dolls > beaded doll

Contemporary artists from South Africa create dolls filled with a multitude of glass beads. Touching and decorative, these works also alternate various metal elements and shells, highlighting the skill and creative sense of their designers.

During the 19th century, tribes united to form the group called Zulu, whose local chiefs, led by the king, are called iduma. Their society is that of warriors organized into age groups. It was in 1884 that they were annexed by the English. Skilled in making ornaments, the Zulus work with leather, metal and ceramics, adding feathers and beads. Pearls, while having a protective role, indicate the social situation of those who wear them.


View details

180.00

Mossi doll
African art > African Dolls > Mossi doll

Fertility doll-statue, the appearance of the head of which varies according to the region, representing a spirit with which a relationship is established. The columnar body bears sagging breasts. The angular head evokes the female hairstyle in crest, the incised motifs, the scarifications and the braids of the ethnic group.
Abraded polychrome patina. Erosions and cracks.

Among many ethnic groups, initiation rites accompany the desire for a child. Wooden figures are then carved, some reflecting both genders, in many cases clothed in beads and clothes. During the period of confinement, the doll, which becomes a child who asks to be fed, washed and anointed on a daily basis, becomes the girl's only companion. After the initiation, they will be carried on the women's ...


View details

290.00

Fali Doll
African art > African Dolls > Fali Doll

African Art from Cameroon.
This African fertility doll symbolizes the marriage vows and the child that will be born from this union. It is the fiancé who makes it and decorates it with multiple trinkets before offering it to the young woman. A calabash pierced with holes, surmounted by a head, is wrapped in fragments of textile and draped with multiple necklaces of pearls, associated with metal objects. The Kirdi , or "pagans", as the Islamized peoples have called them, are established in the far north of Cameroon, on the border with Nigeria.
They include the Matakam, Kapsiki, Margui, Mofou, Massa, Toupouri, Fali, Namchi, Bata, Do ayo... They live from agriculture, fishing and animal husbandry.
Among the Fali, ancestor worship is illustrated by the great importance ...


View details

180.00

Yoruba figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba figure

Ibeji statuettes, incarnation of the missing child in African Yoruba art.
Stripped of its ritual accessories, this naked male figure, supported by rectangular feet, rises in a rectilinear posture. Orange-brown semi-satin patina, residual encrustations, cracks. In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. These African statuettes named ibeji are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of them; she can wash and feed them regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. Considered as much more than a physical representation of a loved one, the ibedji influences the life of the family, which is why the latter continues to address prayers to it ...


View details

250.00

Mossi doll
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Mossi doll

A schematic anthropomorphic fertility doll, whose head appearance varies by region, it represents a spirit with which a relationship is established. The tubular bust, slightly swollen at the abdomen, has a chest. The angular, stylized head evokes the feminine crest hairstyle, the parallel incisions, the scarifications and the braids of the ethnic group. Beautiful light brown patina abraded and sained by contact.
The use of dolls by young African women is not done exclusively within the initiation context. When menstruation occurs, the girl is considered a potential mother. In many ethnic groups, the search for fertility is then done through rituals. Wooden figures will then be carved, some reflecting both genres, in many cases covered with pearls and clothing. During the period of ...


View details

95.00

beaded doll
African art > African Dolls > beaded doll

Contemporary artists from South Africa create dolls filled with a multitude of glass beads. Touching and decorative, these works also alternate various metal elements and shells, highlighting the skill and creative sense of their designers.

During the 19th century, tribes united to form the group called Zulu, whose local chiefs, led by the king, are called iduma. Their society is that of warriors organized into age groups. It was in 1884 that they were annexed by the English. Skilled in making ornaments, the Zulus work with leather, metal and ceramics, adding feathers and beads. Pearls, while having a protective role, indicate the social situation of those who wear them.


View details

180.00

Ewe figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ewe figure

Ex-Belgian African art collection.
An evocation of the missing twin, thisfemale statuette has a light patina on which faint colored residues remain. Cracked base.

The Ewe, often confused with the Minas, are the largest ethnic group in Togo. They are also found as minorities in Ghana, Benin, Côte d'Ivoire and Nigeria. Although we have little historical information about them, it seems that their establishment in their current location results from invasions and conflicts that broke out during the 17th century. The Ewe regard the birth of twins called Venavi (or Venovi) as a happy omen. The latter must be treated identically and fairly. For example, both will be fed and washed at the same time and will wear the same clothes until puberty.
If one of the two twins dies, ...


View details

240.00

Yoruba figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba figure

Ex Belgian African art collection.
Witnessing the great diversity of twin sculptures made according to the indications of the Ifa transmitted to the diviner, the babalawo, this polychrome statuette played the role of substitute for the death of the child.
Slight surface chips and old restoration.
This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, it is the remaining twin who takes over.
Considered as much more than a physical representation of a loved one, the ibedji influences the life of the family, which is why the latter continues to address prayers to him and to dedicate worship and libations to him.

These pieces are among the ...


View details

180.00

Tabwa Mpundu fetish doll
African art > African Dolls > Tabwa doll

Ex-collection African art from Belgium.
The African tribal art of the Tabwa, prestige objects.

Used by the female initiation society, this limbless human figure has feminine attributes and a protruding navel, scarifications comparable to the traditional ones of tribal members. Golden brown patina.
The Tabwa ("to scarify" and "to write") constitute an ethnic group present in the southeast of the DRC. Simple farmers without centralized power, they federated around tribal chiefs after being influenced by the Luba. It is mainly during this period that their artistic current was expressed through statues but also masks. The Tabwa practiced ancestor worship and dedicated some of their statues named mkisi . Animists, their beliefs are anchored around the ngulu, ...


View details

240.00





Previously viewed items
African art  - 

© 2024 - Digital Consult SPRL

Essentiel Galerie SPRL
73A Rue de Tournai - 7333 Tertre - Belgique
+32 (0)65.529.100
visa Master CardPaypal