...
Search option




Discover our exceptionnal items

African art - Pygmée:




Etoffe Pongo of The Pygmies of Ituri
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Textile Pongo

Produced by the pygmies of the Ituri forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these woven fabrics made of ficus bark fibers were painted by women. The men cut wood and hammered the bark, and the women usually used a decoction of gardenia mixed with charcoal ash to draw with their fingers or plant stems patterns similar to the tattoos worn by tribal members. On this thick specimen, grids of different sizes were drawn on the light background, with lines connecting each of them. The rhythm and the space created between the different signs would also have a link with the polyphonic songs with which the Mbuti pygmies of Ituri address God. Texture with a woolly touch. The Mangbetu, in contact with the Asua pygmies, produced a similar type of cloth (called tapa in Oceania) decorated ...

Etoffe Pongo of The Pygmies of Ituri
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Textile Pongo

Produced by the pygmies of the Ituri forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these woven fabrics made of ficus bark fibers were painted by women. The men cut wood and hammered the bark, and the women usually used a decoction of gardenia mixed with charcoal ash to draw with their fingers or plant stems patterns similar to the tattoos worn by tribal members. In this example with its dense, velvety fiber, linear patterns have been drawn on the light background. Small holes at the height of the knots of the bark.
The rhythm and the space created between the different signs would also have a link with the polyphonic songs with which the Mbuti pygmies of Ituri address God. Soft touch texture. The Mangbetu, in contact with the Asua pygmies, produced a similar type of cloth ...

Etoffe Pongo of the Pygmies of Ituri
Sold item
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Textile Pongo

br>
Produced by pygmies in the Ituri forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these woven fabrics made of ficus bark fibers were painted by women. The men cut wood and hammered the bark, and the women usually used a decoction of gardenia mixed with charcoal ash to draw with their fingers or plant stems patterns similar to the tattoos worn by the tribe members.
On this copy, grids of different sizes have been drawn in khaki on a light background, a line connecting each of them, and whose ends sometimes end in a loop. The rhythm and the space created between the different signs would also have a link with the polyphonic songs with which the pygmies of Ituri address God. The Mangbetu, in contact with the Asua pygmies, produced a similar type of cloth (called tapa in ...

Etoffe Pongo of The Pygmies of Ituri
Sold item
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Textile Pongo

Produced by the pygmies of the Ituri forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these woven fabrics made of ficus bark fibers were painted by women. The men chopped wood and hammered the bark, and the women usually used a decoction of gardenia mixed with charcoal ash to draw designs similar to the tattoos worn by the tribe members. On this example, grids of different sizes were drawn on the light background, a line connecting each of them, sometimes forming a loop at the end. The rhythm and the space created between the different signs would also have a link with the polyphonic songs with which the pygmies of Ituri address God. The fibers spread apart at a knot in the bark. The Mangbetu, in contact with the Asua pygmies, produced a similar type of cloth (called tapa in Oceania) ...

Etoffe Pongo of Ituri s pymees
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Textile Pongo

Ex-Swiss African art collection.

Produced by the pygmies of the Ituri forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these woven fabrics made of ficus bark fibers were painted by women. The men cut wood and hammered the bark, and the women usually used a decoction of gardenia mixed with charcoal ash to draw with their fingers or plant stems patterns similar to the tattoos worn by tribal members. On this densely textured specimen, grids of various sizes were drawn on the light background. The rhythm and the space created between the different signs would also have a link with the polyphonic songs with which the Mbuti pygmies of Ituri address God. Soft touch texture. The Mangbetu, in contact with the Asua pygmies, produced a similar type of cloth (called tapa in Oceania) decorated ...


View details

150.00

Etoffe Pongo of the Pygmies of Ituri
Sold item
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Textile Pongo

Ex-collection Belgian African art.
Produced by the pygmies of the Ituri forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these woven fabrics made of ficus bark fibers were painted by women. The men cut wood and hammered the bark, and the women usually used a decoction of gardenia mixed with charcoal ash to draw with their fingers or plant stems patterns similar to the tattoos worn by tribal members. On this example, grids of different sizes were drawn on the light background, lines connecting each of them. The rhythm and the space created between the different signs would also have a link with the polyphonic songs through which the Mbuti pygmies of Ituri address God. Soft touch texture. The Mangbetu, in contact with the Asua pygmies, produced a similar type of cloth (called tapa in ...

Etoffe Pongo of The Pygmies of Ituri
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Textile Pongo

Ex-Swiss African art collection.

Produced by the pygmies of the Ituri forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these woven fabrics made of ficus bark fibers were painted by women. The men cut wood and hammered the bark, and the women usually used a decoction of gardenia mixed with charcoal ash to draw with their fingers or plant stems patterns similar to the tattoos worn by the tribe members.
On this specimen on which the knots of the bark appear, the design is formed of lined patterns drawn on a brown background. The rhythm and the space created between the different signs would also have a link with the polyphonic songs with which the pygmies of Ituri address God. Soft touch texture.< The Mangbetu, in contact with the Asua pygmies, produced a similar type of ...

Pongo Textile of Ituri Pygmies
Sold item
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Etoffe Pongo

Produced by the pygmies of the Ituri forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these woven fabrics made of ficus bark fibers were painted by women. The men cut wood and hammered the bark, and the women usually used a decoction of gardenia mixed with charcoal ash to draw designs similar to the tattoos worn by tribal members. In this example, where the fibers spread locally, grids and star patterns have been drawn on the light background, with a line connecting each one. The rhythm and the space created between the different signs would also have a link with the polyphonic songs with which the pygmies of Ituri address God. The Mangbetu, in contact with the Asua pygmies, produced a similar type of cloth (called tapa in Oceania) decorated with more complex symbols called murumba or ...

Etoffe Pongo of The Pygmies of Ituri
Sold item
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Textile Pongo

Ex collection of Swiss African art.
Produced by the pygmies of the Ituri forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these woven fabrics made of ficus bark fibers were painted by women. The men cut wood and hammered the bark, and the women usually used a decoction of gardenia mixed with charcoal ash to draw designs similar to the tattoos worn by tribal members. In this example, parallel graphics have been drawn on a light background. The rhythm and the space created between the different signs would also have a link with the polyphonic songs with which the pygmies of Ituri address God. The fiber is pierced at two knots in the bark. The Mangbetu, in contact with the Asua pygmies, produced a similar type of cloth (called tapa in Oceania) decorated with more complex symbols called ...

Etoffe Pongo of The Pygmies of Ituri
Sold item
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Textile Pongo

Produced by pygmies in the Ituri Forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these fabrics woven from ficus bark fibers were painted by women. Men cut wood and hammered bark, and women generally used a gardenia decoction mixed with charcoal ash to draw patterns similar to tattoos worn by tribe members using fingers or plant stems.
Sur this copy, parallel lines of light khaki color, of different formats, were drawn on the clear background, lines connecting each of them and sometimes ending with a loop, the whole forming a decorative grid. The rhythm and space created between the different signs would also have a connection with the polyphonic songs through which the pygmies of Ituri address God. Thick texture with a soft touch.
The Mangbetu, in contact with the Asua pygmies, ...

Do you want to hide sold items ? if yes, click HERE
Etoffe Pongo of The Pygmies of Ituri
Sold item
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Textile Pongo

Ex-Collection Swiss African Art.

Produated by pygmies in the Ituri Forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these fabrics woven from ficus bark fibers were painted by women. Men cut wood and hammered bark, and women generally used a gardenia decoction mixed with charcoal ash to draw patterns similar to tattoos worn by tribe members using fingers or plant stems.
Sur this copy, parallel lines of different formats were drawn on the clear background, lines connecting each of them, forming a decorative composition. The rhythm and space created between the different signs would also have a connection with the polyphonic songs through which the pygmies of Ituri address God. Thick texture with a soft touch.

Pongo fabric of Ituri Pygmies
Sold item
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Textile Pongo

Ex-collection Belgian African art.
Produced by the pygmies of the Ituri forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these woven fabrics made of ficus bark fibers were painted by women. The men cut wood and hammered the bark, and the women usually used a decoction of gardenia mixed with charcoal ash to draw with their fingers or plant stems patterns similar to the tattoos worn by tribal members. On this soft-touch specimen, grids of different sizes have been drawn on the light background, lines connecting each of them. The rhythm and the space created between the different signs would also have a link with the polyphonic songs through which the Mbuti pygmies of Ituri address God. Soft touch texture. The Mangbetu, in contact with the Asua pygmies, produced a similar type of cloth ...

Etoffe Pongo of the Pygmies of Ituri
Sold item
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Textile Pongo

Ex-collection Belgian African tribal art.
Produced by the pygmies of the Ituri forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these woven fabrics made of ficus bark fibers were painted by women. The men cut wood and hammered the bark, and the women usually used a decoction of gardenia mixed with charcoal ash to draw with their fingers or plant stems patterns similar to the tattoos worn by tribal members. On this example the lined patterns form a network of gray-black squares animated with some star-like graphics. The rhythm and the space created between the different signs would also have a link with the polyphonic songs with which the pygmies of Ituri address God. Soft touch texture. murumba or nogetwe . This type of fabric, if not worn as a loincloth, could be stretched over ...

Etoffe Pongo d Ituri
Sold item
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Textile Pongo

Produced by pygmies in the Ituri Forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these fabrics woven from ficus bark fibers were painted by women. Men cut wood and hammered bark, and women generally used a gardenia decoction mixed with charcoal ash to draw patterns similar to tattoos worn by tribe members. On this copy, grids of different formats were drawn on the clear background, a traitor each of them, sometimes forming a loop at its end. The rhythm and space created between the different signs would also have a connection with the polyphonic songs through which the pygmies of Ituri address God. The Mangbetu, in contact with the Asua pygmies, produced a similar type of cloth (named tapa in Oceania) decorated with more complex symbols called murumba or nogetwe . This type of fabric, if not ...


View details

Sold

Etoffe Pongo of The Pygmies of Ituri
Sold item
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Textile Pongo

Ex-collection Belgian African art.
Produced by the pygmies of the Ituri forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these woven fabrics made of ficus bark fibers were painted by women. The men cut wood and hammered the bark, and the women usually used a decoction of gardenia mixed with charcoal ash to draw with their fingers or plant stems patterns similar to the tattoos worn by tribal members. On this example, grids of different sizes were drawn on the light background, lines connecting each of them. The rhythm and the space created between the different signs would also have a link with the polyphonic songs through which the Mbuti pygmies of Ituri address God. Soft touch texture. murumba or nogetwe . This type of fabric, if not worn as a loincloth, could be stretched over ...

Etoffe Pongo d Ituri
Sold item
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Textile Pongo

Produced by pygmies in the Ituri Forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these fabrics woven from ficus bark fibers were painted by women. Men cut wood and hammered bark, and women generally used a gardenia decoction mixed with charcoal ash to draw patterns similar to tattoos worn by tribe members.
Sur this copy, grids of different formats have been drawn on the clear background, a traitor each of them, sometimes forming a loop at its end. The rhythm and space created between the different signs would also have a connection with the polyphonic songs through which the pygmies of Ituri address God. The Mangbetu, in contact with the Asua pygmies, produced a similar type of cloth (named tapa in Oceania) decorated with more complex symbols called murumba or nogetwe . This type of ...


View details

Sold

Etoffe Pongo from Ituri
Sold item
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Etoffe Pongo

Ex-collection Swiss African art.
Produced by pygmies from the Ituri forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these fabrics woven from ficus bark fibres were painted by women. Men cut wood and hammered bark, and women generally used a gardenia decoction mixed with charcoal ash to draw patterns similar to tattoos worn by tribal members. On this copy, grids of different formats were drawn on the clear background, a traitconnector each of them, sometimes forming a loop at its end. The rhythm and space created between the various signs would also have a link with the polyphonic songs through which the pygmies of Ituri address God. The Mangbetu, in contact with the Asua pygmies, produced a similar type of cloth (named tapa in Oceania) decorated with more complex symbols called murumba ...


View details

Sold

Etoffe Pongo from Ituri
Sold item
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Etoffe Pongo

Produced by pygmies from the Ituri forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, these fabrics woven from ficus bark fibres were painted by women. Men cut wood and hammered bark, and women generally used a gardenia decoction mixed with charcoal ash to draw patterns similar to tattoos worn by tribal members.
On this copy, grids of different formats have been drawn on the clear background, one of them, sometimes forming a loop at its end. The rhythm and space created between the various signs would also have a link with the polyphonic songs through which the pygmies of Ituri address God. The Mangbetu, in contact with the Asua pygmies, produced a similar type of cloth (named tapa in Oceania) decorated with more complex symbols called murumba or nogetwe . This type of fabric, if not worn ...


View details

Sold





Previously viewed items
African art  -  Brussels - Paris - London

© 2021 - Digital Consult SPRL

Essentiel Galerie SPRL
73A, rue de Tournai - 7333 Tertre - Belgique
+32 (0)65.529.100