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Sao rider
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao rider

In African art , works of Sao Sokoto inspiration are mostly imprinted with the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of riders, usually in bronze, are cast and worn like talismans, patinated and polished by friction. They are considered above all as a remedy to fight against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genius who possesses it is symbolized by the rider.
Subjected to successive attacks from their neighbors in Kanem and then to hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the North-West of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. . More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now disappeared. ...


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Sokoto Rider
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sokoto Rider

In African art , works of Sao Sokoto inspiration are mostly imprinted with the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of riders, usually in bronze, are cast and worn like talismans, patinated and polished by friction. They are considered above all as a remedy to fight against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genius who possesses it is symbolized by the rider.
Subjected to successive attacks from their neighbors in Kanem and then to hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the North-West of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. . More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now disappeared. ...


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Sao Bronze
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao Bronze

Used as an amulet credited with apotropaic virtues, this small bronze sculpture constitutes, for the Sao, a talisman supposed to protect them from madness. It is therefore worn at all times. The genie that would possess the madman is represented by the rider, the horse representing the victim. This rider, wearing a chèche, rides an equine, which was a rare attribute of prestige in these regions of the Sahel, and has a lustrous golden patina. The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries in a geographical area stretching across the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. They settled on hills, which allowed them to repel invaders. Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from ...


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Sokoto bronze
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sokoto bronze

Stylized female figure, represented seated, presenting a dish. Abraded patina, black, with ocher inlays.

The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the 12th and 14th centuries in a geographical area extending over the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. They established themselves on hills, which enabled them to repel invaders. Subjected to successive attacks from their neighbors in Kanem and then to hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the North-West of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. . Lost wax casting was already commonly practiced as early as the 12th century by this African ethnic group, which mainly produced, among the prestige ...


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Rider Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao Rider

In African art, works of Sao Sokoto inspiration are predominantly imbued with the equestrian world.
Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen generally in bronze are cast and worn as talismans, patinated and glossed by rubbing. They are considered above all as a remedy against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie that possesses him is symbolized by the rider.
Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the North-West of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now ...

Rider Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Rider Sao

Used as an amulet credited with apotropaic virtues, this bronze sculpture constitutes, for the Sao, a talisman supposed to protect them from madness. It is therefore worn at all times. The genie that would possess the madman is represented by the rider, the horse representing the victim. This rider, wearing a chèche, rides an equine, which was a rare attribute of prestige in these regions of the Sahel. The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries in a geographical area stretching across the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. They settled on hills, which allowed them to repel invaders. Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to ...

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Bronze Sao
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Bronze Sao

In African art, Sao Sokoto inspired works are mostly imprinted with the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen generally in bronze are cast and worn as talismans, patinated and glossed by rubbing. They are considered above all as a remedy against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie that possesses them is symbolized by the rider.
Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the northwest of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now disappeared. They were found ...


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Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji rider
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao bronze

In African art, Sao Sokoto inspired works are mostly marked by the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen, generally made of bronze, are cast and worn as talismans, with a patina and a lustrous finish. They are considered above all as a remedy against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie that possesses him is symbolized by the rider. Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the northwest of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now disappeared. They were found ...

Sao Sokoto rider
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao rider

This bronze has a coppery patina. The warrior represented on his mount has his head wrapped in a chêche identical to those of the Tuaregs.

In African art, works of Sao Sokoto inspiration are mostly marked by the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen, generally in bronze, are cast and worn as talismans, patinated and polished by rubbing. They are considered above all as a remedy against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie that possesses him is symbolized by the rider. Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the North-West of Cameroon where they mixed with the ...


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Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji rider
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao bronze

In African art, Sao Sokoto inspired works are mostly marked by the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen, generally made of bronze, are cast and worn as talismans, with a patina and a lustrous finish. They are considered above all as a remedy against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie that possesses them is symbolized by the rider.
Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the northwest of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now disappeared. They ...

Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji rider
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao bronze

In African art, Sao Sokoto inspired works are mostly marked by the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen, generally made of bronze, are cast and worn as talismans, with a patina and a lustrous finish. They are considered above all as a remedy against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie that possesses them is symbolized by the rider.
Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the northwest of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now disappeared. They ...

Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji rider
Sold item
African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Sao bronze

In African art, Sao Sokoto inspired works are mostly marked by the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen, generally in bronze, are cast and worn as talismans, patinated and polished by rubbing. They are considered above all as a remedy against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie that possesses them is symbolized by the rider.
Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the northwest of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now disappeared. They were ...

Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji rider
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao bronze

In African art, Sao Sokoto inspired works are mostly marked by the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen, generally made of bronze, are cast and worn as talismans, with a patina and a lustrous finish. They are considered above all as a remedy against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie that possesses them is symbolized by the rider.
Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the northwest of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now disappeared. They ...

Cavalier Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Horseman Sao

Used as an amulet credited with apotropaic virtues, this small bronze sculpture constitutes, for the Sao, a talisman supposed to protect them from madness. It is therefore worn permanently. The genius who would possess the madman is represented by the rider, the horse representing the victim. The rider wearing a goat's head is riding an equine which was a rare attribute of prestige in these regions of the Sahel. Golden brown patina.
The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the 12th and 14th centuries in a geographical area stretching along the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. They settled on hills, which enabled them to repel invaders. Subjected to successive assaults from their neighbors in Kanem and then to hordes from the East, the ...

Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji Horseman
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Horseman Sao

This bronze has a copper patina. The warrior depicted on his mount has his head wrapped in a choir identical to those of the Tuareg.

In African art, The Works of Sao Sokoto Inspiration are mostly imprinted with the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small specimens of riders usually in bronze are melted and worn like talismans, patinated and lustrous by friction. They are seen above all as a remedy to fight possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genius who possesses it is symbolized by the rider. Subjected to the successive onslaughts of their neighbours in Kanem and then to hordes from the east, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in northwestern Cameroon where they mixed with the natives giving ...

Cavalier Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Bronze Sao

Ex-collection french african art.

This bronze has a copper patina. The warrior represented on his mount has his head wrapped in a chestnut identical to those of the Tuaregs.
In African art, Sao Sokoto-inspired works are mostly imbued with the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of riders, generally in bronze, are melted and worn like talismans, patinated and polished by friction. They are considered above all as a remedy to fight against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie who possesses it is symbolized by the rider. Subjected to successive assaults from their neighbors in Kanem and then to hordes coming from the East, the Sao had to abandon their land to settle in the ...

Horseman Sao Sokoto in bronze
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze Sao

This bronze has a copper patina. The warrior represented on his mount has his head wrapped in a chestnut identical to those of the Tuaregs. Base in addition.
In African art, Sao Sokoto-inspired works are mostly imbued with the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of riders, generally in bronze, are melted and worn like talismans, patinated and polished by friction. They are considered above all as a remedy to fight against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie who possesses it is symbolized by the rider. Subjected to successive assaults from their neighbors in Kanem and then to hordes coming from the East, the Sao had to abandon their land to settle in the North-West of Cameroon ...

Cavalier Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze Sao

This bronze has a copper patina. The warrior represented on his mount has his head wrapped in a chestnut identical to those of the Tuaregs.
In African art, Sao Sokoto-inspired works are mostly imbued with the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of riders, generally in bronze, are melted and worn like talismans, patinated and polished by friction. They are considered above all as a remedy to fight against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie who possesses it is symbolized by the rider. Subjected to successive assaults from their neighbors in Kanem and then to hordes coming from the East, the Sao had to abandon their land to settle in the North-West of Cameroon where they ...

Horseman Sao Kotoko
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze Sao

This bronze has a copper patina. The warrior depicted on his mount has his head wrapped in a choir identical to those of the Tuareg.

In African art, The Works of Sao Sokoto Inspiration are mostly imprinted with the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small specimens of riders usually in bronze are melted and worn like talismans, patinated and lustrous by friction. They are seen above all as a remedy to fight possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genius who possesses it is symbolized by the rider. Subjected to the successive onslaughts of their neighbours in Kanem and then to hordes from the east, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in northwestern Cameroon where they mixed with the natives giving ...


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Cavalier Sao Kotoko Putchu Guinadji
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Bronze Sao

Used as an amulet credited with apotropaic virtues, this small bronze sculpture is, for the Sao, a talisman supposed to protect them from madness. It is therefore worn at all times. The genius who would possess the madman is represented by the rider, the horse depicting the victim. The rider wearing a cheche rides an equine that was a rare prestige attribute in these sahel regions. Golden brown patina.
The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the 12th and 14th centuries in a geographical area extending along the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. They settled on hills, which allowed them to repel the invaders. Subjected to successive onslaughts from their Kanem neighbours and then to hordes from the east, the Sao had to abandon their lands to ...

Cavalier Sao Kotoko Putchu Guinadji
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Horseman Sao

Used as an amulet credited with apotropaic virtues, this small bronze sculpture is, for the Sao, a talisman supposed to protect them from madness. It is therefore worn at all times. The genius who would possess the madman is represented by the rider, the horse depicting the victim. This rider wearing a cheche rides an equine that was a rare attribute of prestige in these regions of the Sahel, has an interesting patina of use. The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the 12th and 14th centuries in a geographical area extending along the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. They settled on hills, which allowed them to repel the invaders. Subjected to the successive onslaughts of their neighbours in Kanem and then to hordes from the east, the Sao had to ...





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