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African art - Teke:




Teke Kidumu mask shield
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African art > African Shield > Teke shield

Only the Tsaayi, among the Teke subgroups of Gabon, produced wooden masks from the mid-20th century. They were used by members of the secret male brotherhood kidumu ( kidumu is the name of the society, the dance, and the mask), at funerals of village notables or at weddings and other important ceremonies. Since the independence of the Congo, they appear more and more at celebrations. The pictograms of the Teke masks emphasize oppositions symbolizing duality in the universe: circular, they are divided horizontally by a band and their surface is decorated with geometric motifs painted with white, red, black or ochre pigments. In addition to a lunar symbolism, these pictograms refer to regional body scarifications.
Satin patina. Abraded polychromy. Crack of desiccation.


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Teke Biteke fetish statue
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African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Téké fetish

The bust of this statuette is spherical, ritually charged with magical ingredients named "Bonga" or "bilongo", draped with different textiles on which a thick crusty coating agglomerates. The face is traditionally streaked with scarifications. Shaded brown patina. Established between the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Republic of the Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized into chiefdoms whose head was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right of life or death over his family, whose importance determined his prestige. The head of the clan, ngantsié , for his part, kept the great protective fetish tar mantsié , which oversaw all ceremonies. It was the powerful witch doctor and diviner who "loaded" the individual statuettes with ...


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250.00  200.00

Buti Teke power figure
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Teke statue

Revealed to receive the mystical charge called "Bonga", this Teke ancestor statue is coated with a crusty gangue. An accessory in the form of a similar miniature figure is attached to the receptacle. Matt patina, locally flaked. Established between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Teke were organized into chieftaincies whose chief was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu, had the right of life or death over his family, whose importance determined his prestige. The chief of the clan, ngantsié , kept the great protective fetish tar mantsié , who supervised all ceremonies. It was the powerful witch doctor and diviner who "loaded" the individual statuettes or nkumi with magical elements, in return for payment. According to the Teke, wisdom ...


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390.00  312.00

Teke Mask - Tsaayi Kidumu
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Teke Mask

Only the Tsaayi, among Gabon's Téké subgroups, produced wooden masks as early as the mid-19th century. They were used by members of the secret male brotherhood kidumu (the kidumu is the name of society, dance, and mask), dances at the funerals of village notables or at weddings and other important ceremonies. Since Congo's independence, they have appeared more and more at the celebrations of rejoicing. This sculpture using the plank mask is not fitted with eye perforations and could be a box mask.
The pictograms of the Téke masks emphasize oppositions symbolizing duality in the universe: circular, they are divided horizontally by a band and their surface is decorated with geometric patterns painted with white, red, black or ochre pigments. In addition to lunar symbolism, these ...


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Teke Butti Statues
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Teke Fetish

This effigy of an ancestor, imprisoned in a clay aggregate on which various small talismans, horns, knuckles, and metal objects are piled around the magical charge called "Bonga Offers a face engraved with parallel incisions.
Established between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized into chiefdoms whose leader was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right of life or death over his family, whose importance determined his prestige. The head of the clan, ngantsié , for his part, kept the great protective fetish tar mantsié , which supervised all ceremonies. It was the powerful witch doctor and diviner who "loaded" the individual statuettes with magical elements, in return for payment. It was also ...


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Statuette Teke Nkumi
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African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Teke Fetish

Ex-collection of Belgian African art.
Small statuette representing a Teke ancestor. The hollowed out abdomen does not have a reliquary to shelter the mystical charge called "Bonga", the striated faces of the traditional scarification, are surmounted by a large crescent. The crescents are surmounted by a large crescent.
Established between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized into chiefdoms whose chief was often chosen from among blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right of life or death over his family, whose importance determined its prestige. The head of the clan, ngantsié , kept the great protective fetish, tar mantsié , who supervised all the ceremonies. It was the powerful wizard healer and soothsayer who "charged" ...


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180.00  144.00

Fetish Téké Matomba
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African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Statue Teke

Four statuettes have a common, spherical trunk, in which the magic charge named " Bonga " or "bilongo" is wrapped in different textiles. The faces are wearing a conical, rimmed hat, highlighted with a red cloth. Satin brown patina, abrasions and desication crack. Established between the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized as chiefdoms, the leader of which was often chosen among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right to life or death over his family whose importance determined his prestige. The clan leader, ngantsié , kept the great protective fetish tar mantsié which oversaw all ceremonies. It is the powerful sorcerer-healer and soothsayer who loaded the individual statuettes with magical elements, for a fee. It ...


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Teke Buti fetish statuette
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Teke Fetish

Figure with singular morphology, beautiful decorative object devoid of arms and endowed with a bust in ringed barrel. It is carried by thick legs with damaged feet. These fetishes were usually always ritually loaded with magical elements, which is not the case here. Satin black brown patina.
Andeblis between the Republic of Congo, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Teké were organized into chiefdoms whose leader was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right to life or death over his family whose importance determined his prestige. The leader of the clan, ngantsié, kept the great protective fetish tar mantsié who oversaw all the ceremonies. It was the mighty sorcerer and soothsayer who charged magical elements, for payment, ...


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Statuette Teke
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Teke

A massive neck is topped with a face with voluntary expression. The rectangular beard overlooks a body whose abdomen has been hollowed out to contain the mystical charge called Bonga. A difference in hue between the body and legs demonstrates the age of this figure Buti Teke hermaphrodite (no apparent sex). Similarly this body was originally wrapped in a tissue that held the load in the abdominal cavity. The age of the piece explains the current absence of this fabric. The face and neck are coated with a sacrificial crusty patina.
Andeblis between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Teké were organized into chiefdoms whose leader was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right to life or death over his family whose importance ...


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Teke Mpwau statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Teke figure

Joined back to back, these figures of Téké or Biteke ancestors share a hollowed-out, reworked, glass-blocked common core to shelter the mystical charge called Bonga. The whole thing is tied and coated with crusty materials. The faces streaked with traditional scarifications, bordered by a wide collar encrusted with cauris, are topped with a large crescent.
Andeblis between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Teké were organized into chiefdoms whose leader was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right to life or death over his family whose importance determined his prestige. The clan leader, ngantié , kept the great tar-mantsie protective fetish that oversaw all the ceremonies. It was the mighty sorcerer and soothsayer who ...


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380.00

Teké Medicinal Horn
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African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Fetish Téké

This horn has been filled with ingredients to which magical properties are attributed. Two sculpted heads, bearing the traditiobnnelles scarifications teké, emerge, held by textile ropes tied at the base. Glossy dark patina.
benebene between the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized into chiefdoms whose leader was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right to life or death over his family whose importance determined his prestige. The clan leader, gantié , kept the great protective fetish ttar mantsié who oversaw all the ceremonies. It was the mighty sorcerer and soothsayer who charged magical elements, for payment, individual statuettes. It was also according to his instructions that ...


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Statuette Fetish Téké Biteke
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African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Fetish Biteke

Established between the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized into chiefdoms whose leader was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right to life or death over his family whose importance determined his prestige. The clan leader, gantié , kept the great protective fetish ttar mantsié who oversaw all the ceremonies. It was the mighty sorcerer and soothsayer who charged magical elements, for payment, individual statuettes. It was also according to his instructions that worship was given to the ancestors. Statues without magic charge were named nkiba, the janiform statues embodying pwaw . The statuettes, named mutinu bmmba , matomba or butti , were given an apotropic function or ensured the proper ...

Janiform statuette Buti Teke
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African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Statuette Teke

An idea to house the magical charge called " Bonga " or "bilongo", this fetish biteke (sculpted figure) embodies an ancestor of the clan. It also symbolized the conviction that the abdomen contains wisdom. These fetishes were arranged on the altars of the chiefs. Semi satin patina.
Andeblis between the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized into chiefdoms whose leader was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right to life or death over his family whose importance determined his prestige. The clan leader, gantié , kept the great protective fetish ttar mantsié who oversaw all the ceremonies. It is the powerful sorcerer healer and soothsayer who was unloaded" of magical elements, for ...

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Small Teke slot drum
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African art > Tam Tam, Djembe, musical instruments > Teke Drum

This figurative slot drum incorporates the characters of the buti sculptures embodying the ancestors of the clan or those of statues for individual use. The resonant case is sheathed with animal skin fixed by thin brass heads. The stick, connected to the instrument by a string, offers a delicately carved tip of a similar head.
Black brown satin and mahogany satin.
Andeblis between the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized into chiefdoms whose leader was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right to life or death over his family whose importance determined his prestige. The clan leader, gantsié , kept the great protective fetish tr hated who oversaw all the ceremonies. It was the ...


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Protective figure Teke Biteke
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Teke

This biteke fetish, devoid of arms, is coated with a clay agglomerate imprisoning three similar figures of reduced size. While sorcerers teke used a variety of sculptures dedicated to healing or protection, women also had them for the purpose of promoting their fertility or protecting their offspring. A native restoration was carried out on one of the feet, still covered with rubber.
Patine mate, black and ochre.
Andeblis between the Republic of Congo, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Teké were organized into chiefdoms whose leader was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right to life or death over his family whose importance determined his prestige. The clan leader, gantsié , retained the great protective fetish ...


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380.00  304.00

Téké fetish scepter
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African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Scepter Téké

Established between the Republic of Congo, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Teké were organized into chiefdoms whose leader was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right to life or death over his family whose importance determined his prestige. The clan leader, gantsié , retained the great protective fetish tar mantsié who oversaw all the ceremonies. It is the powerful sorcerer healer and soothsayer who wascharged" of magical elements, for retribution, the individual statuettes, "mussassi". It was also according to his instructions that worship was given to the ancestors and geniuses of nature. Their secret society, kidumu , used circular flat masks adorned with polychrome geometric patterns. This fetish with a dorsal orifice ...


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180.00  144.00

Statue Teke janiforme Mpwau
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Teke

The barrel bust of this Teké statue or dickke fetish, whose faces are topped with a wide crescent returning to the brows, has been hollowed out to house the mystical charge called "Bonga". A textile draped around the object, now missing, kept the load in its receptacle. Established between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Teké were organized as chiefdoms, the leader of which was often chosen among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right to life or death over his family whose importance determined his prestige. The leader of the clan, ngantsié, kept the great protective fetish tar mantsié who oversaw all ceremonies. It is the powerful sorcerer healer and soothsayer who loaded " of magical elements, for retribution, individual statuettes or nkumi . ...


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250.00  200.00

Ancestor statuette Teke- Yansi Butti
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Teké statue

This statue of Teké-Yansi ancestor, in sacred dance position nibiki, half-flexed legs, has a globular abdomen in which relics or a magical charge ( butti) have been introduced.  Accessories such as chick feathers, vegetable twigs, ossicles and teeth are attached to the wicker strap highlighting the volume of the bust.  Traditional scarifications, in parallel grooves (mabina) are present on the cheeks.
As a powerful character, warrior, nganga, hunter emeritus, or family ancestor, this tribal statue was honored as part of the family cult.
Clay plasters, kaolin residue. Oiled patina.
Established between the Republic of Congo, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Tekine were organized as chiefdoms, the leader of which was often chosen among the blacksmiths. The ...

Scepter Teké Buti
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Sceptre Teke

Ex-German African art collection.
This command stick consists of two statuettes with a quadrangular abdomen in which magic substances (bilongo) were introduced. A mirror seals these abdominal cavities. Traditional scarifications, in parallel grooves (mabina) cover the faces. Playing a couple of powerful characters, warriors, ngangas, hunter emeritus, or ancestors, these figures are receptacles of spirits charged with fighting witchcraft, disease, etc. Mate patina, slight loclaized erosions. Established between the Republic of Congo, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Teké were organized as chiefdoms, the leader of which was often chosen among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right to life or death over his family whose importance determined his ...


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Teke Mask - Tsaayi Kidumu
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Teke Mask

Only the Tsaayi, among the Teké subgroups of Gabon, produced wooden masks as early as the mid-20th century. They were used by members of the secret male brotherhood kidumu (kidumu is the name of society, dance, and mask), dance at the funerals of village officials or at weddings and other important ceremonies.
They appear more and more, since The independence of Congo, at the celebrations of rejoicing. This mask is a discoid board mask: the wearer of the mask held it between the teeth with a braided ribbon. The perforations were used to fix feathers and fibers that would perfect the harmony of the costume. Reduced openings are concealed on either side of the nose.
The pictograms of the Teke masks emphasize oppositions symbolizing duality in the universe: circular, they are ...


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Ancestor figure Teke Butti
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Teke

This ancestor effigy whose rectangular abdomen has been hollowed out to house the magical charge called " Bonga " is camped on half-flexed legs with massive feet. A pronounced pout reinforces the determination of his attitude. The face is engraved with parallel incisures and extends from the beard of the old. Its strange prestige headdress consists of a circular element topped by a crest whose end comes to die between the eyebrows. Xylophages, misses. Greyed light brown skate and kaolin use.
Established between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized as chiefdoms, the leader of which was often chosen among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right to life or death over his family whose importance determined his prestige. The leader ...


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