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African art - Ashanti:

The Ashanti people consider the woman as the final arbiter of all decisions. Fertility and children are the most frequent themes represented in Ashanti wooden sculptures. These wooden figures were worn by pregnant women, tightly wrapped in their loincloths, to ensure the arrival of beautiful children.


Ashanti Akua ba doll
African art > African Dolls > Ashnati doll

Vows of fertility in African art Ashanti.
Stylized sculpture named Akua'ba (plural Akua'mma) presenting features specific to Ashanti dolls which are generally devoid of legs: flat and circular head surmounting a cylindrical bust with horizontal arms. Thin colored pearl necklaces contrast with the dark patina.
Locally abraded satin black patina.
These stylized wooden effigies were worn by pregnant women, tight in their loincloth, to ensure the arrival of beautiful children. The overwhelming majority of these statues are female, with breasts.

The Ashanti are one of the ethnic groups of Ghana (former "Gold Coast"), part of the Akan group, living in a covered region of forests. Like other populations living in the central and southern part of ...


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180.00

Ashanti Akua  ba doll
African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Fertility wishes in African art Ashanti.
This stylized female figure, called Akua'ba (plural Akua'mma), has features peculiar to Ashanti dolls, usually devoid of legs: a flat, circular head surmounting a cylindrical bust with horizontal arms. Thin necklaces of colored beads contrast with the dark patina.
These stylized wooden effigies were worn by pregnant women, tightly wrapped in their loincloths, to ensure the arrival of beautiful children. The overwhelming majority of these statues are female, with breasts.

The Ashanti are one of the ethnic groups of Ghana (formerly the "Gold Coast"), part of the Akan group, inhabiting a region covered by forests. Like other populations living in the central and southern part of Ghana, they speak a language of the Twi ...


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180.00

Ashanti Akua  ba doll
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Vows of fertility in African Ashanti art. This stylized female figure, called Akua'ba (plural Akua'mma), has features typical of Ashanti dolls, generally without legs: a flat, circular head surmounting a cylindrical bust with horizontal arms. Thin necklaces of colored beads contrast with the glossy mahogany patina. These stylized wooden effigies were worn by pregnant women, tightly wrapped in their loincloths, to ensure the arrival of beautiful children. The overwhelming majority of these statues are female, with breasts.

The Ashanti are one of the ethnic groups of Ghana (formerly the "Gold Coast"), part of the Akan group, inhabiting a region covered by forests. Like other populations living in the central and southern part of Ghana, they speak a language of the Twi ...


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Akua ba Ashanti doll from Ghana
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Used among the Ashanti and Fantis of Ghana, Akuaba (plural Akua'mma)doll statuettes are amulets used by Ashanti women to promote fertility. They are easily identified by their stylized appearance. Their flat and circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part, the features are generally drawn in the lower third of the head. A mark of beauty, the often ringed neck also symbolizes prosperity.
Worn on the back of women, these statues are also accompanied by various rites, such as the ingestion of a potion, or the placing of the object on the family altar. After the birth of the child, the sculpture is used as a toy, and sometimes still offered to the healer to witness its effectiveness. Orange patina.

Atumpan drum Ghana
African art > Tam Tam, Djembe, musical instruments > Ashanti drum

African musical instruments. Throughout the African continent, these drums accompany various ceremonies with their rhythm. The animal skin is stretched over the sounding board with a fiber rope attached to large wooden posts. This Ashanti tam-tam, with its hollow cylindrical shaft, has a dull, ochre-yellow patina from use. Desiccation cracks.
The Ashanti form one of the ethnic groups of Ghana (formerly the "Gold Coast"), of the Akans group, inhabiting a region covered by forests. Like other populations living in the central and southern part of Ghana, they speak a language of the Twi group.
Ref: "Royal Museum for Central Africa, Musical Instruments" J. Gansemans.


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290.00

Ashanti Akua ba doll from Ghana
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Fertility wishes in African art Ashanti.
This stylized female figure, called Akua'ba (plural Akua'mma), has features peculiar to Ashanti dolls, generally devoid of legs: flat, circular head surmounting a cylindrical bust framed by horizontal arms. Fine colored bead necklaces contrast with the satin black patina.
These stylized wooden effigies were worn by pregnant women, tightly wrapped in their loincloths, to ensure the arrival of healthy children. The overwhelming majority of these statues have female attributes.

The Ashanti are one of the ethnic groups of Ghana (formerly the "Gold Coast"), part of the Akan group, inhabiting a region covered by forests. Like other populations living in the central and southern part of Ghana, they speak a language of ...

Akua ba Ashanti doll from Ghana
Sold item
African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Used among the Ashanti and Fantis of Ghana, Akuaba (plural Akua'mma)doll statuettes are amulets used by Ashanti women to promote fertility. They are easily identified by their stylized appearance. Their flat and circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part, the features are generally drawn in the lower third of the head. A mark of beauty, the often ringed neck also symbolizes prosperity.
Worn on the back of women, these statues are also accompanied by various rites, such as the ingestion of a potion, or the placing of the object on the family altar. After the birth of the child, the sculpture is used as a toy, and sometimes still offered to the healer to witness its effectiveness. Dark brown glossy patina.

Ashanti Ghana doll
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Akuaba (plural Akua'mma )doll statuettes are amulets used by Ashanti women to promote fertility. They are easily identified by their structure. Their circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part, the features are usually drawn in the lower third of the head. The latter is carried by a cylindrical body whose arms develop in right angle. The legs are absent, the trunk integrating directly into a slightly wider base. Oiled mahogany patina.
This people consider the woman as the final arbiter of all decisions. Fertility and children are the most frequent themes evoked in Ashanti wood sculptures. This ethnic group built a relatively democratic society based on the moral value of the individual. The Ashanti founded a monarchy in the 17th century. The identities of ...


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Ashanti Akua ba doll
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Fertility wishes in African art Ashanti.
This stylized female figure, called Akua'ba (plural Akua'mma), has features peculiar to Ashanti dolls, generally devoid of legs: flat, circular head surmounting a cylindrical bust framed by horizontal arms. Fine colored bead necklaces contrast with the satin black patina. Erosions.
These stylized wooden effigies were worn by pregnant women, clasped in their loincloths, to ensure the arrival of healthy children. The overwhelming majority of these statues have female attributes.

The Ashanti are one of the ethnic groups of Ghana (formerly the "Gold Coast"), part of the Akan group, inhabiting a region covered by forests. Like other populations living in the central and southern part of Ghana, they speak a language of ...


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Poupée Ashanti Akua ba Ghana
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Used among the Ashanti and Fantis of Ghana, the Akuaba (plural Akua'mma) doll statuettes are amulets used by Ashanti women to promote fertility. They are easily identifiable because of their stylized appearance. Their flat, circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part of the head, and the lines are usually drawn in the lower third of the head. A mark of beauty, the ringed neck also symbolizes prosperity. Carried on the backs of women, these statues are also accompanied by various rites, such as the ingestion of a potion, or the arrangement of the object on the family altar. After the birth of the child, the sculpture is used as a toy, and sometimes still offered to the healer to witness its effectiveness. Lustrous brown-black patina.

Akuaba Ashanti doll statue
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Akuaba (plural Akua'mma) doll statuettes are amulets used by Ashanti women to promote fertility. They are easily identifiable by their structure. Their circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part, the features are generally drawn in the lower third of the face. The tubular bust whose arms develop at right angles is carried by a circular base. Two-tone matt patina.
This people consider the woman as the final arbiter of all decisions. Fertility and children are the most frequent themes evoked in Ashanti wood sculptures. This ethnic group built a relatively democratic society based on the moral value of the individual. The Ashanti founded a monarchy in the 17th century. The identities of the various Akan ethnic groups have been influenced by both Islam and ...


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Ashanti Akua ba doll from Ghana
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Ex-collection of French African art.
Used among the Ashanti and Fantis of Ghana, the Akuaba (plural Akua'mma) doll statuettes are amulets used by Ashanti women to promote fertility. They are easily identifiable because of their stylized appearance. Their flat, circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part of the head, and the lines are usually drawn in the lower third of the head. A mark of beauty, the ringed neck also symbolizes prosperity. Carried on the backs of women, these statues are also accompanied by various rites, such as the ingestion of a potion, or the arrangement of the object on the family altar. After the birth of the child, the sculpture is used as a toy, and sometimes still offered to the healer to witness its effectiveness. Lustrous golden light ...

Ashanti Akua  ba doll
Sold item
African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Vows of fertility in African Ashanti art. This stylized female figure, called Akua'ba (plural Akua'mma), has features typical of Ashanti dolls, generally without legs: a flat, circular head surmounting a cylindrical bust with horizontal arms. Fine necklaces of colored beads contrast with the dark, highly lustrous patina. Abrasions. These stylized wooden effigies were worn by pregnant women, tightly wrapped in their loincloths, to ensure the arrival of beautiful children. The overwhelming majority of these statues are female, with breasts.

The Ashanti are one of the ethnic groups of Ghana (formerly the "Gold Coast"), part of the Akan group, inhabiting a region covered by forests. Like other populations living in the central and southern part of Ghana, they speak a ...


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Akua ba Ashanti doll from Ghana
Sold item
African art > African Dolls > Ashnati doll

Ex-collection of French African art.
Used among the Ashanti and Fantis of Ghana, the Akuaba (plural Akua'mma) doll statuettes are amulets used by Ashanti women to promote fertility. They are easily identifiable because of their stylized appearance. Their flat, circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part of the head, and the lines are usually drawn in the lower third of the head. A mark of beauty, the often ringed neck also symbolizes prosperity. Carried on the backs of women, these statues are also accompanied by various rites, such as the ingestion of a potion, or the placement of the object on the family altar. After the birth of the child, the sculpture is used as a toy, and sometimes still offered to the healer to witness its effectiveness. Lustrous dark brown ...

Ashanti Akua  ba doll
Sold item
African art > African Dolls > Ashnati doll

Fertility wishes in African art Ashanti.
This stylized female figure, called Akua'ba (plural Akua'mma), has features peculiar to Ashanti dolls, usually devoid of legs: a flat, circular head surmounting a cylindrical bust with horizontal arms. Fine colored bead necklaces contrast with the semi-matt black patina.
These stylized wooden effigies were worn by pregnant women, tightly wrapped in their loincloths, to ensure the arrival of beautiful children. The overwhelming majority of these statues are female, with breasts.

The Ashanti are one of the ethnic groups of Ghana (formerly the "Gold Coast"), part of the Akan group, inhabiting a region covered by forests. Like other populations living in the central and southern part of Ghana, they speak a language of ...


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Ashanti Maternity
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Ashanti Maternity

Belgian private collection of African art Jan Putteneers.

Seated female representations from Côte d'Ivoire and Ghana are usually queens. A particularity of this piece is that this woman is carrying her child in her arms.
This one is removable like the stool. The latter with a curved seat is typical of the akan.
seats. The patina is clear and slightly worn in places.
The features of the face are marked with black color giving a realistic look, breathing life into the large black pupils.

The Akan people are subdivided into several famous subgroups spread near the coast in Ivory Coast and Ghana, having become rich through the trade of precious metals and slaves during contacts with Westerners and in particular the Portuguese who were the ...


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Poupée Akua ba Ashanti Ghana
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Used among the Ashanti and Fantis of Ghana, the Akuaba (plural Akua'mma) doll statuettes are amulets used by Ashanti women to promote fertility. They are easily identifiable because of their stylized appearance. Their flat, circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part of the head, and the lines are usually drawn in the lower third of the head. A mark of beauty, the ringed neck also symbolizes prosperity. Carried on the backs of women, these statues are also accompanied by various rites, such as the ingestion of a potion, or the arrangement of the object on the family altar. After the birth of the child, the sculpture is used as a toy, and sometimes still offered to the healer to witness its effectiveness. Lustrous dark brown patina.

Poupée Ashanti Akua ba
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African art > African Dolls > Statuette Ashanti

Fertility wishes in African art Ashanti.
This stylized female figure, called Akua'ba (plural Akua'mma), has features specific to ashanti dolls, usually devoid of legs: flat, circular head surmounting a cylindrical bust with horizontal arms. Fine coloured pearl necklaces contrast with the particularly lustrous dark patina. These stylized wooden effigies were worn by pregnant women, huddled in their loincloths, to ensure the arrival of beautiful children. The overwhelming majority of these statues are female, with breasts.

Shanti are one of the ethnic groups in Ghana (formerly Côte de l'Or), part of the Akan group, living in a forested area. Like other people living in the central and southern part of Ghana, she speaks a language of the Twi group. This people regard women ...


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Akua ba Ashanti Ghana doll
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Used among the Ashanti and Fantis of Ghana, the Akuaba (plural Akua'mma) doll statuettes are amulets used by Ashanti women to promote fertility. They are easily identifiable because of their stylized appearance. Their flat, circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part of the head, and the lines are usually drawn in the lower third of the head. A mark of beauty, the ringed neck also symbolizes prosperity.
Carried on the backs of women, these statues are also accompanied by various rites, such as the ingestion of a potion, or the arrangement of the object on the family altar. After the birth of the child, the sculpture is used as a toy, and sometimes still offered to the healer to witness its effectiveness. Dark brown patina locally abraded.


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Poupée Ashanti Akua ba
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African art > African Dolls > Statuette Ashanti

Fertility wishes in African art Ashanti.
This stylized female figure, wearing a custom abrasion, is called Akua'ba (plural Akua'mma). It has traditional features: a flat, circular head surmounting a narrow bust with horizontal arms. Fine pearl necklaces highlight its volumes. Locally abraded dark satin patina.br>These stylized wooden effigies were worn by pregnant women, huddled in their loincloths, to ensure the arrival of beautiful children. The overwhelming majority of these statues are female, with breasts.

Shanti are one of the ethnic groups in Ghana (formerly Côte de l'Or), part of the Akan group, living in a forested area. Like other people living in the central and southern part of Ghana, she speaks a language of the Twi group. This people regard women as the ...


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Sold

Ashanti Akua ba doll
Sold item
African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Fertility wishes in African art Ashanti.
This stylized female figure, called Akua'ba (plural Akua'mma), has features specific to ashanti dolls, usually devoid of legs: flat, circular head surmounting a cylindrical bust with horizontal arms. Fine necklaces of colored beads embellish the sculpture. Smooth honey-coloured patina.br>These stylized wooden effigies were worn by pregnant women, tightly in their loincloths, to ensure the arrival of beautiful children. The overwhelming majority of these statues are female, with breasts.

Shanti are one of the ethnic groups in Ghana (formerly Côte de l'Or), part of the Akan group, living in a forested area. Like other people living in the central and southern part of Ghana, she speaks a language of the Twi group. This people regard ...


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