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African art - Bambara:

The Bambara, Bamana, live in central and southern Mali. Their name means "unbeliever" and was given to them by the Muslims. They belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and Malinke. Animists, they also believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala, who has 266 sacred attributes. One for each day of the 9 lunar months that a child is gestating. Ngala maintains the order of the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, master of the Word, who gave all qualities to men and who makes the fruits of the earth grow.


Ntomokum Bambara mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bamana mask

African art and masks of initiation ceremonies
It is during the initiation ceremonies of young boys relating to the Ntomo society and shared with their Malinke neighbors, that the Bambara dance these masks.
The long, busted nose, which the Bambara favor in their tribal statuary, is associated with sociability and clan cohesion. In front of the four horns encrusted with cowries stands a sculpture in the round representing a woman.
Dark brown patina, oiled and matt. The groups of Bambara artisans nyamakala , more specifically the blacksmiths named numu , are in charge of carving ritual objects, endowed with the nyama , occult energy. Using fire and magical objects, the role of healer and diviner is also attributed to them. Their powers are transmitted to their ...


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Bambara Nyeleni statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bamana statue

Sculpture named "little favorite", Nyeleni in Bambara, represented frontally, her narrow bust widening toward the curved volume of the hips bears "shell" breasts.
The hands that extend the long arms rest on the knees. The very stylized face is framed by "horseshoe" ears.
Fine cracks of desiccation. Semi-matt oiled patina. The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and Malinke. They believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala who maintains the order of the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro. Large masked festivals close the initiation rites of the dyo association and the ritual of the gwan of the Bambara in southern Bambara country. Spread over a period ...


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490.00

Ci wara Bamana female crest mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Ci Wara mask

The mask presented consists of a basketry and textile hat, bordered by long raffia bangs, surmounted by a stylized sculpture of a female antelope and her young. A very fine piece, engraved with harmoniously distributed chevrons and grooves. The braided raffia, extended by long blond locks, evokes a feminine hair. It would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The latter recall the myth through the stylized representation of a hippotrague antelope, whose name ci wara means "fauve of the earth". The Bamara, Bamana, of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and Malinke. Animists, they believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala who maintains the order of the universe. His ...


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450.00

Bambara figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bambara statue

Sculpture named "little favorite," Nyeleni in Bambara, carved in angular volumes, depicting a woman standing on flat, half-bent legs rising from a circular block. Her large hands rest on her hips. Her very graphic head is highlighted by a long crest. Misses on one of the ears. Velvety black matte patina.
The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and Malinke. They believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala who maintains the order of the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro. Large masked festivals close the initiation rites of the dyo association and the ritual of the gwan of the Bambara in southern Bambara country. Spread over a period of seven years as far ...


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180.00

Bambara female figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bambara figure

Smaller version of the sculpture known as the "little favorite," Nyeleni in Bambara, depicted standing, hands extending long arms resting on thighs. The feet, oversized, carry a slender body outlined with multicolored necklaces.br> Desiccation cracks, crazing. Patina encrusted with ritual anointing.
The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and Malinke. They believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala who maintains the order of the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro. Large masked festivals close the initiation rites of the dyo association and the ritual of the gwan of the Bambara in southern Bambara country. Spread over a period of seven years as far as men ...


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240.00

Horizontal crest Ci wara Bamana
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bambara Mask

The fifth initiatory society Bambara, Bamana, is called tyiwara (ci, cultivate, wara, fauve) and is still practiced nowadays in some villages. These crest masks evoking the antelope, oryx or daged hippotrague depending on the case, are declined vertically and horizontally. Presenting themselves to the public in pairs, male and female, the wearers of the masks adopt a symbolic choreography related to agriculture. Belonging to the regional type Goso kun ,emanating from the region of Bamako, this horizontal crest is strewn with triangular incisions, patterns and hatchings evoking the animal's coat. Its tapered ears are perforated at regular intervals. Fatty black-brown patina, abrasions and lacks on one of the ears.
Carried on the top of the skull and held in place by a ...

Statuette Bambara Nyeleni
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statuette Nyeleni

Sculpture named "little favorite", Nyeleni in Bambara, represented frontally, palms forward, breasts in "obus" on a narrow bust widening towards a wide prominent buttocks. The half-flexed legs are proportionally reduced. The face is covered with a streaked crest whose side mats frame the ears of the "en horseshoe. The piece, streaked with notches and parallel grooves, features a light brown matte patina with powdery beige ocré inlays.
Desication cracks. The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, such as the Soninke and Malinke. They believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala who maintains the order of the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, who gave all the qualities to men and who grows ...


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240.00

Large statue of a dignitary Bambara
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > dignitary Bambara

Ex private French collection of African art.

This Bambara dignitary figure is distinguished by its high stature and the solemnity of its expression. Her eyelids are lowered, adding an enigmatic character, and the stylization of her features is reminiscent of her Dogon neighbors. The naked person sits proudly on a stool, a weapon in each hand. He wears an ovoid headdress on his head. Two braids hang from the back of the head. The dark patina has beautiful traces of desiccation and a nice aging. The Bambara are found in central and southern Mali. This name means unbeliever and was given to them by the Muslims. They belong to the large Mande group, like Soninke and Malinke. They believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala, which has 266 sacred attributes. ...

Crest Ci wara Bamana figurative
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Crest Ti wara

Figurative version of Ti-wara, Ci wara, in African art. It would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The latter recall the myth through the stylized representation of a hippotrague antelope, whose name ci wara means "wilderness of the earth". The piece is enhanced with fine decorative motifs raised in copper.
Matt brown patina, ochre residue.
The Bambara, Bamana, of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and Malinke. Animists, they believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala who maintains the order of the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, who gave all the qualities to men and who makes the fruits of the earth ...

Cimier Bambara Tyi Wara Kun Mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Ci Wara

Ex-collection African art from Belgium.
Work having participated in numerous exhibitions in the United States. Belonging to the regional Goso kun type, emanating from the Bamako region, this horizontal crest is studded with triangular incisions, patterns and crosshatching evoking the animal's coat. Its tapered ears are perforated at regular intervals. Dark matte patina.
Worn at the top of the skull and held in place by a sort of small basket, these crests accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tòn, an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks would leap across the field to chase away the nyama, evil effluvia, and to detect any danger, or to flush out the evil genies that could steal the soul of the cultivated plants as well as the vital force of ...


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Tyi Wara Kun Bambara crest mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Ti Wara Mask

Ex French tribal art collection.
Bambara in African art. Composite abstract variant of Ci Wara, this tribal art sculpture evoking the antelope is developed into a zoomorphic body with two horizontally extended heads of horns, probably referring to a reference to twinning in the creation of the Bambara world. Underlined with rhombic motifs and parallel incisions, the object was restored in situ using metal staples and vegetable fibers. The matt oily patina is eroded in many places, revealing a clear, desiccated wood. Rectangular metal base. Carried at the top of the skull and held in place by a kind of little basket, these tyiwara masks, more generally crest, accompanied the dancers during the rituals of tòn, an association dedicated to agrarian cults. The masks roamed the field ...


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390.00

Large mask Ci wara of Bamana
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African art > Ci Wara, Ti Wara, Bambara antelope masks > Ci wara mask

Ex-collection French African art.
This variant of the African sculpture Ci Wara of the Bambara, Bamana, forms a decorative element prized by collectors. Its dimension here is larger than usual. It would rather be in this case a piece intended for an altar. Striations engraved on the surface show the peeling, and a copper loop adorns an ear. Matt patina. Sculpted by the blacksmith numu, also playing the role of diviner and healer, this vertical, stylized crest is represented here with successive arches representing the mane of a male antelope. It would be an animal - genie called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The Bambara remember the myth through the stylized representation of a hippotrague antelope, whose name ci wara means "earth tiger". Worn ...


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Crest mask Ci wara kun Bambara
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bamana mask

The Ti-wara, Ci wara, in African art.
It would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambaras to cultivate the land. They remember the myth through the stylized representation of a hippotrague antelope, whose name ci wara means " fawn of the earth". Decorated on the head and flanks with metal veneers engraved with repoussé, the ears and muzzle are further embellished with cotton tassels, pearls and cowrie shells. The tips of the horns are also wrapped in leather and lined with horsehair. Successive arches show the wide neck bearing a mane. The characteristics make it possible to attribute it to the stylistic canons of the Segou region. Velvety matte patina.br /> Carried on the top of the skull and held in place by a kind of small basket, these crest ...

Grand Tyiwara, ci wara, vertical
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Sculpture Bamana

Deployed in an imposing format, this sculpture linked to the cult ci wara symbolizes an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The latter recall the myth through the stylized representation of a hipporague antelope, whose name ci wara signifies of the earth. The shapes of these cimiers, however, vary from region to region across Mali. This sculpture was probably intended for an altar. Dark skate, mate. Abrasions and cracks.
Ported to the top of the skull and held in place by a sort of small basket, these cimiers accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tion , an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks bound the field as they leaped to drive out nyama, evil scents, and to detect any danger, or to flush out evil ...

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Statue Dyonyeni Bambara, Bamana
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Bambara

African art among the Bambara.
This African statue of favorite "small", Nyeleni in Bambara, is shown in the frontal position, legs half-flexed on a circular base. The face is capped with a streaked crest, ears of the "en horseshoe "se draw laterally. The scarred body shows signs of motherhood and fertility through full and stretched breasts, in shells, and prominent abdomen. Oily patina, oiled, ocreted residues. The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, such as the Soninke and Malinke. They believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala who maintains the order of the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, who gave all the qualities to men and who grows the fruits of the earth. Large masked ...


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Crest Ci wara, Tyiwara, Bamana
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Cimier Bambara

Ti-wara masks in African art.
It would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. They remember the myth through the stylized representation of a hippotrague antelope, whose name ci wara means " fawn of the earth". This vertical sculpture of Ci Wara, where the animal is more realistic than usual, is represented surmounted by female figures sitting back to back. The masks usually danced in pairs. Matt patina, metal inlays, slight cracks of desiccation and abrasions.

Worn on the top of the skull and held in place by a basketry toque, these crests accompanied the dancers during the rituals of tòn , an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks ran across the field, leaping up and down in order to ...

Female figure Bambara Dyoneni, Nyeleni
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Female figure Bambara Dyoneni, Nyeleni

Femininity tutelary in the African art bambara, this sculpture of "little favorite",

Nyeleni in Bambara, is described stuck on a rounded base. The triangular face is capped with an incised ridge of parallel lines, heads. The scarified body displays the attributes of fertility by the full and tense breasts, the abdomen very slightly convex, the generous hips and the representation of the sex. The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like Soninke and Malinke, who believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala which has 266 sacred attributes: one for each day of the 9 Ngala maintains order in the universe, its existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, who gave all These are qualities to men, and they grow ...

Ntomo Bambara Mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bambara Mask

This African mask of the ntomo, an initiatory society of uncircumcised youths widespread in the Niger River region, is considered a male mask thanks to its six horns. This mask appears mainly during the harvest season. At the top appears the effigy of the antelope " ci wara". It is embellished with buckles, cowries and cotton pompoms. Patina very slightly satin. Established in central and southern Mali, in a savannah area, the Bambara, "Bamana" or "unbelievers", as the Muslims have named them, belong to the large Mande group, along with the Soninke and Malinke. Mostly farmers, but also herders, they are the largest ethnic group in Mali. Animists, they believe that the existence of a god requires the gestation of a child. Ngala maintains the order of the universe. His existence ...


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Cavalier Bamana
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Cavalier Bambara

The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, such as the Soninke and Malinke. They believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala who maintains the order of the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, who gave all the qualities to men and who grows the fruits of the earth. Large masked festivals close the initiation rites of the dyo association and the ritual of the gwan of the bambara in the south of the Bambara country. Spread over a seven-year period for men, they are less demanding for women. The new initiates then celebrate, in groups, from village to village, their symbolic rebirth. These are the sons of the blacksmiths who dance around the statues that were available outside the festivities grouped ...


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Figure of Queen Bambara
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Bamana

These female statues named Guandoudou were surrounded by statues depicting their servants guannyeyi, with cups of offerings or supporting their breasts. The blacksmiths of the Dyo society used them during ceremonies marking the end of the initiation.

This seated figure sports the distinctive Bambara hairstyle, a crest and two side mats, her child is placed against her bust. The disproportion between the upper body and the lower limbs, truncated, forms a recurring character for this type of sculpture. The dark brown patina, oiled, reveals a light wood under the abraded areas.
The Bambara (or "incroyant") of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and Malinke. They believe in the existence of a creative god generically called Ngala and ...


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Masque Bamana Lion
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bambara Mask

Large zoomorphic mask with a jaw articulated by rubber ties. Mate patina, dry, locally cracked revealing an old vivid paint. Abrasions, cracks and misses.
Establishes in central and southern Mali, in a savannah area, the Bambara ," Bamana " or " unbelievers ", as the Muslims have named them, belong to the great Mande group, along with the Soninke and Malinke. Mainly farmers, but also herders, they make up the largest ethnic group in Mali. In addition to their remarkable masks, the Bozo and Bambara are renowned for their puppets of various size and frequently articulated, exhibited during the puppet theatre Sogow bo which is organized on the initiative of the young people of the villages, mainly in the Ségou region, and which plays an educational role. Multicolored geometric ...


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