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African art - Bambara:

The Bambara, Bamana, live in central and southern Mali. Their name means "unbeliever" and was given to them by the Muslims. They belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and Malinke. Animists, they also believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala, who has 266 sacred attributes. One for each day of the 9 lunar months that a child is gestating. Ngala maintains the order of the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, master of the Word, who gave all qualities to men and who makes the fruits of the earth grow.


Ti wara Bambara
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Ti wara Bambara

African Art and the founding myths Bambara
This highly stylized animal statue refers to the horse-antelope Ciwara ("wild of the earth") who would have taught agriculture to man. She would also have offered him the first cereal. The mask-crest was attached to a basketry hat by raffia ties. Brown matte patina.
One ear is missing. Erosions.
Worn at the top of the head, these crests accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tòn, an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks traversed the field while leaping in order to drive out from this one the nyama, malefic emanations, and to detect any danger, or to flush out the malevolent genies who could ravish the soul of the cultivated plants as well as the life force of their seeds.

Established in ...


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180.00

Bambara mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bambara mask

This African mask Bambara has a long face, framed by growths representing mats. Intersecting linear patterns are incised on the matte surface. Patina of abraded use. Erosions and indigenous restoration.
The Bambara, Bamana (or "unbeliever" for Muslims), living in central and southern Mali, belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and the Malinke. Animists, they also believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala, who would have 266 sacred attributes.
He coexists with another androgynous god, Faro, master of the Word. It is during the initiation ceremonies of young boys relating to the society of Ntomo, n'domo, and shared with their neighbors Malinke (including the Marka sub-group composed of Fulani and Moors living north of the Bamanas), ...


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380.00

Ti Wara
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Ti Wara

A skillfully arched structure, openwork, and engraved with streaks to represent the coat, here forms one of the variants of African sculpture Ci Wara of the Bambara, Bamana, a decorative element prized by collectors. Speckled matte patina.

Sculpted by the blacksmith numu, who also plays the role of diviner and healer, this vertical, stylized crest is represented here with the successive arcs figuring the mane of a male antelope. It would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The latter remember the myth through the stylized representation of an antelope antelope, whose name ci wara means "wild animal of the earth". Worn at the top of the skull and held in place by a basketry hat, these crests accompanied the dancers ...


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Ci wara Bambara
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Ci wara Bambara

Ti-wara masks in African art.
It would be a genius animal called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. They recall the myth through the stylized representation of a hippotrague antelope, whose name ci wara means " fawn of the earth. Adorned on the head and sides of slats of copper, ears and muzzle are embellished with cotton thread pompoms. The tops of the horns inclined towards the rear are also sheathed in leather and horsehair. This sculpture of Ti wara would come from the region of Ségou.
Velvety mat patina. Carried at the top of the head and held in place by a sort of small basket, these crests accompanied the dancers during the rituals of tòn , an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks bounded across the field in order ...


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Bambara statue
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African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Bambara statue

Sitting on a seat, this sculpted figure incorporates a fertility cult associated with the Djo, or Do, widespread in central Mali. Long called "Queen", this type of statue participated every seven years in ceremonies during which they were presented to women without children. The latter washed the sculptures then anointed them with shea.
A mat from the headdress is missing, desication cracks, small accidents.
The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and the Malinke. They believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala who maintains order in the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, who gave all the qualities to men and who makes the fruits of the earth grow. Large ...


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Ti wara Bambara
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Ti wara Bambara

African Art and the founding myths Bambara
This abstract sculpture refers to the antelope-horse Ciwara ("wild of the earth") who would have taught agriculture to man. She would also have offered him the first cereal. The crest was attached to a basketry hat by raffia ties. Brown matte patina.
Worn at the top of the head, these crests accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tòn, an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks traversed the field while leaping in order to drive out from this one the nyama, malefic emanations, and to detect any danger, or to flush out the malevolent genies who could ravish the soul of the cultivated plants as well as the life force of their seeds.

Established in central and southern Mali, the Bambara," Bamana" or ...


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180.00

Bamana Crest
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bamana Crest

It would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The latter remember the myth through crest masks, of which this example forms a rare abstract version from the Sikasso region, accompanied by stylized zoomorphic figures. The narrow structure is flat, openwork, bringing together geometric patterns and animal heads.
Velvety matte patina, abrasions, desication cracks.
Established in central and southern Mali, the Bambara , Bamana" or "unbelievers ", as the Muslims have called them, belong to the large Mande group, along with the Soninke and the Malinke. Worn at the top of the head and held in place by a basketry hat, the crests accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tòn, an association dedicated to ...


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280.00

Ci Wara Crest Mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Ci Wara Crest Mask

Saverio African Art Collection.
The graceful curves of this Ci Wara are available here in a rough, clear and matte wood. The stylized antelope, whose name Ci wara or Sogoni kunsogoni kun signifies "fauve of the earth" rises vertically from a base, its small on its back. The metal veneer that accompanies it on the head is dyed a beautiful turquoise blue, revealing in places an underlying red fabric. Pyrogravé motifs dot the horns and heads of the animals. Worn at the top of the skull and held in place by a sort of small basket, these cimiers accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tion , an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks bound the field as they leaped to drive out nyama, evil scents, and to detect any danger, or to flush out evil geniuses that could ...


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Bamana mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bamana mask

This African mask from the ntomo, an initiatory society of uncircumcised young people widespread in the Niger River region, is considered a male mask, thanks to its six horns.
Most of these masks are coated with a calcined charcoal powder. This mask mainly appears in the harvest season. This piece is particularly distinguished by its animal crest associated with the mythical ci wara antelope. Smooth matte patina.br /> Desication abrasions, chips and cracks.
Established in central and southern Mali, in a savannah zone, the Bambara, "Bamana" or "unbelievers", as the Muslims have named them, belong to the large Mande group, with the Soninke and the Malinke. Mainly farmers, but also breeders, they make up the largest ethnic group in Mali. Animists, they believe in the ...


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Bamana mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bamana mask

Ti-wara masks in African art.
It would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The latter remember the myth through crest masks, of which this example forms a rare abstract version from the Sikasso region, accompanied by stylized female figures. Velvety matte patina, cracks.
Worn at the top of the head and held in place by a basketry hat, these crests accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tòn, an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks traversed the field while leaping in order to drive out from this one the nyama, malefic emanations, and to detect any danger, or to flush out the malevolent genies who could ravish the soul of the cultivated plants as well as the life force of their ...


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380.00

Bambara statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bambara statue

This African statue of "little favourite", Nyeleni in Bambara represented frontally, wears a ridged crest, diamond-shaped protruding ears, an acute profile. The scarified bust displays the symbols of fertility that are the breasts in shells, and the prominent abdomen. Light matte patina.
The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and the Malinke. They believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala who maintains order in the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro. Large masked parties close the initiation rites of the dyo association and the gwan ritual of the Bambara in the south of the Bambara country. Spread over a period of seven years for men, they are less demanding for ...


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490.00

Ci wara
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Ci wara

The Ti-wara in African art.

An animal - genius called Ciwara would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The latter recall the myth through the stylized representation of an antelope, whose name ci wara means "wild of the earth. Brown matte patina.
Worn at the top of the skull and held in place by a basketry cap, these crests accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tòn, an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks traversed the field while leaping in order to drive out from this one the nyama, malefic emanations, and to detect any danger, or to flush out the malevolent genies who could ravish the soul of the cultivated plants as well as the life force of their seeds.

Established in central and southern Mali, the Bambara , ...


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380.00

Bambara mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bambara mask

Figurative version of the Ti-wara, Ci wara, in the African art .
. It would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The latter recall the myth through the stylized representation of a hippotrague antelope, whose name ci wara means "false of the earth". The sculpture is embellished with decorative motifs outlined in copper leaf.
Matt powdery patina.
The Bambara, Bamana, of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and Malinke. Animists, they believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala who maintains the order of the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, who gave all qualities to men and who makes the fruits of the earth ...


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Bambara mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bambara mask

The Ti-wara in African art.
It would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The latter recall the myth through the stylized representation of an antelope, whose name ci wara means "wild of the earth. Adorned on the head and sides with slats of copper fringed with leather, the ears and muzzle are embellished with cotton thread pompoms, cowrie shells and pearls.The top of the horns is sheathed in leather and horsehair.This sculpture of Ti wara would come from the region of Ségou.Matte patina .
Worn at the top of the skull and held in place by a kind of small basket, these crests accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tòn, an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks traversed the field while leaping ...


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Bamana shutter
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African art > Doors, shutters, ladders dogon wood > Bamana shutter

This granary shutter is made up of two panels assembled by large metal staples, and is sculpted with bas-relief motifs referring to the agrarian world and its symbols. Indeed, it would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The latter recall the myth through the stylized representation of a hippotrague antelope, whose name ci wara means "false of the earth". Worn on top of the skull and held in place by a kind of small basket, these crests accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tòn , an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks would leap around the field to chase away the nyama, evil effluvia, and to detect any danger, or to flush out the evil genies that could take away the souls of the cultivated plants ...


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Head of a Bambara, Bamana statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bambara Head

TheBamana, like the Dogon, glorify the ancestors like this vestige of a statue, the head of a dignitary wearing the traditional cap, extending laterally with braids. Heavy lowered eyelids breathe a solemn look into the face. Abraded brown patina. Lacks.
Desication cracks.
The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, like the Soninke and the Malinke. The Bambara nyamakala artisan groups, more specifically the blacksmiths named numu, are in charge of carving ritual objects, endowed with the nyama , occult energy. Using fire and magic items, they are further assigned the role of healer and diviner. Their powers are transmitted to their wives, who alone have the right to produce the pottery. Six male associations, the Dyow, using Bambara masks, ...


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240.00

Bambara hammered iron animal figurine
African art > Black iron objects, black iron masks > Bamana iron

Belgian African art collection.
Thick old patina for this stylized animal figure of the Bambara, made of black iron. The mammal is a symbol of fertility and vigor. Grainy texture, ochre patina.
Established in central and southern Mali, in a savannah area, the Bambara, "Bamana" or "unbelievers", as the Muslims have called them, belong to the large Mande group, along with the Soninke and the Malinke. Mostly farmers, but also breeders, they make up the largest ethnic group in Mali. The groups of Bambara artisans nyamakala , more specifically the blacksmiths named numu , are in charge of sculpting ritual objects, endowed with the nyama , occult energy. Using fire and magical objects, the role of healer and diviner is also assigned to them.
Their powers are ...

Ntomo Bambara mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bamana mask

This African mask from the ntomo, an initiatory society of uncircumcised youth prevalent in the Niger River region, appears primarily during the harvest season. The abstract crest, atypical, makes this mask special. Thick patina of use, matt, locally grainy. Abrasions. Established in central and southern Mali, in a savannah zone, the Bambara, "Bamana" or "unbelievers" as the Muslims have called them, belong to the large Mande group, along with the Soninke and the Malinke. Mostly farmers, but also breeders, they make up the largest ethnic group in Mali. Animists, they believe in the existence of a god that requires the gestation of a child. Ngala maintains the order of the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, who gave all qualities to men and who ...


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Bambara, Bamana N tomo mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bamana mask

This African mask from the ntomo, an initiatory society of uncircumcised youth prevalent in the Niger River region, is considered a male mask, in view of its six horns.
Most of these masks are coated with charcoal powder, which is the case here. This mask appears mainly during the harvest season. This piece is particularly notable for its animal crest associated with the mythical antelope ci wara . Dark grainy patina.
Abrasions and cracks of desiccation.
Established in central and southern Mali, in a savannah area, the Bambara," Bamana " or " unbelievers ", as the Muslims have named them, belong to the large Mande group, along with the Soninke and the Malinke. Mostly farmers, but also breeders, they make up the largest ethnic group in Mali. Animists, they ...

Bamana masker
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bamana masker

Equipped with a spherical front, this African mask Bambara extends with a toothed bifid beak. The eyes, framed by pastilles representing ears, are carved in bas-relief while a human nose, straight, stands out. Linear, parallel patterns are characteristic of the Bambara. Matte patina, desiccation cracks and erosions.

Height on plinth: 77 cm.
We find the Bambara , Bamana , in central and southern Mali. This name means "unbeliever" and was given to them by Muslims. They belong to the great Mande group, like the Soninke and the Malinke. Animists, they also believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala, who has 266 sacred attributes.
His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, master of the Word, who gave all the ...


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390.00

Bambara mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bambara mask

Les Ti-wara dans l'art africain. Ce serait un animal - génie appelé Ciwara qui aurait appris aux Bambara à cultiver la terre. Ces derniers se remémorent le mythe à travers la représentation souvent stylisée d'une antilope hippotrague, dont l'appellation ci wara signifie "fauve de la terre. Patine mate veloutée, abrasions, petits accidents, érosion de la base.
Portés au sommet du crâne et maintenus en place par une sorte de petit panier, ces cimiers accompagnaient les danseurs au cours des rituels du tòn , association dédiée aux travaux agricoles. Les masques parcouraient le champ en bondissant afin de chasser de celui-ci les nyama, effluves maléfiques, et de détecter tout danger, ou de débusquer les génies malfaisants pouvant ravir l'âme des plantes cultivées ainsi que la ...


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