...
Search option




Discover our exceptionnal items

African art - Bénin:

Beninese art is described as court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as the oba. The tradition of Ifè bronze court objects dates back to the 14th century. The many bronze heads and statues created by Benin artists were reserved for the exclusive use of the inhabitants of the royal palace and, more often than not, placed on altars consecrated by each new oba, the ethnic king. These rectangular altars were topped with heads, statues, carved ivory tusks, bells and sticks. They were used to commemorate an oba and to make contact with his spirit.


New product
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > New product

The palatial tribal art of Benin.Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. War scenes were reproduced on narrative plates, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chefs, heavy bracelets, hairs and recades were produced in quantity in many workshops of smelters according to the technique of cast iron with lost wax. The killing of the king of animals associated with the legends, the leopard, was the privilege of the chief, the Oba. The feline could then serve as an offering for the worship of the chief's head. Sometimes tamed by various royal guilds, he accompanied the chief on his travels. The Oba, named " ...


View details

Sold

Yoruba Bronze
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Yoruba Bronze

Metaphor of royal power in African art from the Benin Kingdom.
Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works, mainly bronze sculptures, celebrating their power. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, majestic felines, heavy bracelets, anklets and recades were produced in quantity in numerous foundry workshops using the lost wax casting technique. Placed on the altar dedicated to the queen mother from the 16th century in Benin City in Nigeria, the bronze depicting a rooster, Okpa, glorified royal power with its haughty appearance. This type of sculpture has a finely striated surface evoking the plumage of the bird. The animal is represented perched on a ...


View details

Sold

Benin Plate
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Benin Plate

Ex-collection French African art.
Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of kings, the Oba , was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. In African tribal art, glorifying war scenes were reproduced on narrative plates, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chefs, majestic felines, heavy bracelets, hairs and recades were produced in quantity in many workshops of smelters according to the technique of cast iron with lost wax. During the 16th century, oba Esigie commissioned the first copper alloy plates with embossed ornamentation. Many of them were cast in pairs to symmetrically decorate the pillars or walls of the palace. Olfert Dapper describes these plaques ...


View details

Make offer

1995.00

Benin rider figure Bini Edo
Sold item
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Benin Rider

The African art of Benin is described as a court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as Oba. The tradition of bronze classroom objects from the Benin Kingdom dates back to the 14th century. The many brass heads and statues created by the artists of Benin were reserved for the exclusive use of the inhabitants of the royal palace and, more often than not, placed on altars consecrated by each new Oba. These rectangular altars were surmounted by heads, statues, carved ivory tusks, bells and sticks. They were used to commemorate an oba and to get in touch with his spirit. The craftsmen of Benin also produced figures of horseriders, representing according to interpretations either a benign king or a Yoruba emissary of the oyo cavalry. It could also be Oranmiyan, which ...

Head Benin
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Head Benin

The African art of Benin is described as a court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as Oba. The tradition of bronze classroom objects from the Benin Kingdom dates back to the 14th century. The many bronze alloy heads and statues created by the artists of Benin were reserved for the exclusive use of the inhabitants of the royal palace and, more often than not, placed on altars consecrated by each new Oba. These rectangular altars were surmounted by heads, statues, carved ivory tusks, bells and sticks. They were used to commemorate an oba and to get in touch with his spirit. This late sculpture, which was made on the death of the Queen, depicts a queen mother of Benin named the Iyoba , whose neck is surrounded by multiple necklaces of coral beads. Her high curved ...


View details

Sold

Head Benin
Sold item
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Head Benin

African art Benin.
This zoomorphic head refers to the rich symbolism attached to the leopard, king of the bush. It also embodies the qualities that the Oba must possess. In the Kingdom of Benin, the killing of the king of animals associated with legends, the leopard, was the privilege of the leader, the Oba. The feline could then serve as an offering for the cult of the head of the chief. Sometimes tamed by various royal guilds, he accompanied the chief on his travels. The Oba, named "false of the house" leopard, could also offer teeth or skin to commanders whose loyalty was evident. The rich benign iconography is therefore full of references to this animal. Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba , was ...


View details

Sold

Bronze Benin
Sold item
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bronze Benin

Metaphor of royal power in the African art of the Benin Kingdom
Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of kings, the Oba , was illustrated by multiple works, mainly bronze sculptures, celebrating their power. War scenes glorifying them were reproduced on narrative plates, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chefs, majestic felines, heavy bracelets, hairs and recades were produced in quantity in many workshops of smelters according to the technique of cast iron with lost wax. Placed on the altar dedicated to the Queen Mother as early as the 16th century in Benin City in Nigeria, the bronze depicting a rooster, Okpa, glorified royal power by its alt-like appearance. Produced ...


View details

Sold

Do you want to hide sold items ? if yes, click HERE
Benin leopard
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Benin leopard

The palatial tribal art of Benin.
Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. War scenes were reproduced on narrative plaques, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, heavy bracelets, anklets and recades were produced in quantity in many foundry workshops using the lost wax casting technique. The killing of the king of animals associated with legends, the leopard, was the privilege of the chief, the Oba. The feline could then serve as an offering for the cult of the chief's head. Sometimes tamed by various royal guilds, it accompanied the leader on his travels. The Oba, named "child of the ...


View details

Sold

Bronze Benin
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze Benin

Before the destruction of the palace of the Benin kingdom in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. War scenes were reproduced on narrative plaques, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, heavy bracelets, anklets and recades were produced in quantity in numerous workshops of founders according to the technique of the lost wax casting. The leopard, representing the royal power, has a central place in the culture of the Benin kingdom because this animal appears in the founding myth of which King Ewuare is the hero. According to the legend, King Ewuare wakes up after spending a night next to a leopard and a snake without realizing it. As in other ...


View details

Sold

Benin Uhunmwun elao memorial head
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze Benin

This late bronze made from a work that was made on the death of the queen, depicts a queen mother of Benin named the Iyoba, whose neck is circled with multiple necklaces of coral beads. Her high curved hairstyle was also made up of a mesh of pearls falling on either side of the face. Dark patina, greenish reflections.
After the birth of the future king, the queen was "removed" from power and could no longer father. But at the end of the 15th century the Oba Esigie refused to conform to this practice and wanted to attribute the town of Uselu to his mother. She also received a palace and many privileges. In recognition she raised an army to go and fight the Igala of the North. The Oba cast a head in his effigy, among many works cast in lost wax, to place them on his altar after his ...

Large Royal Altar Head Benin
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Large Royal Altar Head Benin

Ex private English collection of African art.

Altar heads are famous pieces in benign art. Like the other bronzes, they were cast using the lost wax technique. These pieces are very loaded with details and patterns. This royal head with realistic features has facial scarifications and many finely detailed ornaments. A recurring feature, the warhead headdress is imposing and beautifully decorated.

The art of Benin is described as a court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as oba. The tradition of Ifè's bronze classroom objects dates back to the 14th century.

The many bronze heads and statues created by the artists of Benin were reserved for the exclusive use of the inhabitants of the royal palace and, more often than not, placed on ...

Benin horse rider
Sold item
African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Benin horse rider

Numerous heads and statues out of bronze made by Benin craftmen were kept for personal use of the nobility., and , most of the time put on altars consecrated by each new Oba. These rectangular-shaped altars were surmounted by heads, statues, carved ivory tusks, bells and staffs. They were being used to recall a Oba and to get in touch with his spirit.


View details

Sold

Royal equestrian figure Bini Edo Benin
Sold item
African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Benin rider

African art from Benin is described as court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as the Oba. The tradition of bronze court objects in the Benin kingdom dates back to the 14th century. The many brass heads and statues created by Benin artists were reserved for the exclusive use of the inhabitants of the royal palace and, more often than not, placed on altars consecrated by each new Oba. These rectangular altars were topped with heads, statues, carved ivory tusks, bells and sticks. They were used to commemorate an oba and to contact his spirit. Beninese artisans also produced figures of horsemen on horseback, representing either a Beninese king or a Yoruba emissary of the Oyo cavalry, depending on interpretation. It could also be Oranmiyan, who imported horses to ...

Bronze Benin
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze Benin

Belgian tribal art collection.
The mastery of bronze in African art.
L'Oba has a so-called 'winged' headdress (ikekeze) which was introduced by the Oba Osemwede (1816 - 1848 as well as a ceremonial dress composed of numerous necklaces of coral pearls. Grainy patina.
The art of Bnin is described as a court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as oba . The tradition of bronze court objects by Ifè dates back to the 14th century. Before the destruction of the palace of the kingdom of Bnin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba , was illustrated by numerous works celebrating their power. War scenes were reproduced on narrative plates, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, ...


View details

Sold

Benin Statue
Sold item
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Benin Statue

This bronze sculpture depicts a Portuguese soldier armed with a rifle, a dagger at the hip, dressed in his traditional military garb. The Portuguese arrived in Benin in the 15th century, endowed with a military arsenal that aroused great interest among kings. The power of firearms was then naturally associated with the occult defense against invisible enemies. In the 16th century, Europeans played a major role at the Oba court: they imported corals and glass beads, shackles also highly coveted by the king and his courtiers. At the same time, their soldiers participated in Benin's military campaigns, notably against the kingdom of Idah. The tremendous increase in imports of metal in the form of shackles, used as bargaining chips, provided bronze craftsmen with enormous quantities of raw ...


View details


Sold for 350.00 Find similar item

Bronze Benin dwarf figure
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze Benin

Dressed in a loincloth, sporting necklaces of coral beads, the figure depicted realistically offers an imposing head in which the eyes appear blind. Satin black patina.
In African art, Benin art is described as a court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as Oba.
The dwarves of the king's entourage, which appeared in the 15th century, were intended not only for diversion, but also for surveillance. Occult gifts were indeed given to them. According to Fagg, these characters were also acrobats and illusionists. Their bronze figures were to adorn the altars of the ancestors.

Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba , was illustrated by multiple codified works celebrating their ...


View details

Sold

Benin leopard figure
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Benin Statue

The palatial tribal art of Benin
Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of kings, the Oba , was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. War scenes were reproduced on narrative plates, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chefs, heavy bracelets, hairs and recades were produced in quantity in many workshops of smelters according to the technique of cast iron with lost wax.
The killing of the king of animals associated with the legends, the leopard, was the privilege of the chief, the Oba. The feline could then serve as an offering for the worship of the chief's head. Sometimes tamed by various royal guilds, he accompanied the chief on his travels. The ...


View details

Sold

Bronze Benin leopard figure
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Leopard Benin

Ex-Corsican African art collection.
The leopard, representing the royal power, has a central place in the culture of the Benin kingdom because this animal appears in the founding myth of which King Ewuare is the hero. According to the legend, King Ewuare wakes up after spending a night next to a leopard and a snake without realizing it. As in other cosmogonies, animals are the manifestation or even the incarnation of supernatural forces. To be spared by these predators is therefore a sign of divine blessing. Before the destruction of the palace of the Benin kingdom in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. War scenes were reproduced on narrative plaques, made of bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze ...

Leopard figure Benin
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze Leopard

The leopard, depicting the royal power, has a central place in the culture of the benign kingdom because this animal appears in the founding myth of which King Ewuare is the hero. According to legend, he wakes up after spending a night next to a leopard and a snake without realizing it. As in other cosmogonies, animals are the manifestation or even the embodiment of supernatural forces. Being spared by these predators is therefore a sign of a divine blessing. Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba , was illustrated by numerous works celebrating their power. War scenes were reproduced on narrative plates, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, heavy ...


View details

Sold

Bronze Benin leopard figure
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Leopard Benin

The palatial tribal art of Benin.
This bronze sculpture engraved with lozenges indicating the ocelles of the coat has a black brown patina.
The killing of the king of animals associated with legends, the leopard, was the privilege of the chief, the Oba. The feline could then serve as an offering for the cult of the head of the chief. Sometimes tamed by various royal guilds, he accompanied the chief on his travels. The Oba, named 'child of the house leopard', could also offer teeth or skin to commanders whose loyalty was evident. The rich benign iconography is therefore full of references to this animal.
Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by numerous works celebrating their ...

Benin Bronze Portuguese Colon Plate
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Benin Bronze Portuguese Colon Plate

Ex-Belgian tribal art collection.
The mastery of bronze in African art. This exceptional and ancient piece depicts a Portuguese settler.
This character carrying in the right hand what appears to be a firecracker and in the left hand a sword. The shackles (open bronze ring) encircling the figure testify to the importance of the Portuguese to the Oba, king of the ethnic group, and the dominant class of the Kingdom Benin in the 16th century.
Indeed, the tremendous increase in imports of metal in the form of shackles, used as a bargaining chip, provided bronze craftsmen with huge quantities of raw material for their works and contributed greatly to the economic boom. Benin.
The Portuguese is therefore presented here as a provider of wealth. In the 16th century, they ...





Previously viewed items
African art  -  New York - Paris - London

© 2022 - Digital Consult SPRL

Essentiel Galerie SPRL
73A Rue de Tournai - 7333 Tertre - Belgique
+32 (0)65.529.100
visa Master CardPaypal