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African art - Kongo:




Kakongo Nkisi fetish figure
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Kakongo fetish

The Vili , the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé, and the Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, led by the king ntotela . Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory and copper trade and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary with codified gestures related to their worldview. The Kakongo are composed of Bakongo tribes from the left bank of the Zaire River. Sorcerers nganga , both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God called Nzambi through consecrated figures. To this end, individual protective figures nkisis, to protect against witchcraft and various plagues, are made and loaded by the nganga with all the necessary ingredients to achieve this purpose.


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120.00

Nkisi Kongo Yombé couple figures
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statues Yombé

Ex French African art collection.
These Kongo statues forming a couple have slightly different physiognomies thanks to the rictus of the female figure. The bilongo elements conferring additional powers to this tribal art object named nkisi were housed in the reliquary-forming cup on the woman's abdomen. The metal reputed to hold protective virtues is present in the form of nails dotting the sculpture. Satin patina, granular residue. The witch doctors nganga , both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God called Nzambi through these consecrated figures. Aggressive witchcraft kindoki is the absolute evil that must be fought. To this end, protective nkisis figures are made and loaded by the nganga with all the ingredients necessary to ...

Kongo Yombe carved box
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Yombe box

The lid of this container bears allegorical motifs, carved in the round, representing three figures including a maternity hospital sitting on a log. Desiccation cracks and abrasions.
The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombé were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rites, in particular by means of sculpted fetishes. The naturalistic art of the Bayombe, in addition to masks and nkisi fetishes , includes prestigious sculptures and objects associated with the Lemba cult, glorifying harmony and married life.
In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads of the borders between the current DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the ...


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Kongo Yombe Pfemba figure
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African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Kongo figure

A carved figurine of the Kongo, this female effigy embodies the clan ancestor, a mediating figure.
The child embodies the matrilineal transmission of power.
The mouth reveals traditionally filed teeth, the eyes seem exorbitant, underlining the capacity of the ancestress to discern occult things.
The use of this type of carving is not well known. However, they frequently formed the motif carved at the top of the chiefs' canes. Light brown patina. Cracks and abrasions.
A clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the West African coast, in the southwestern Republic of the Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternities. Among the Kongo , the nganga took charge of rituals by activating a spiritual force with a nkondi ...


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Statuette Congo
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Statuette Congo

Coll. Belgian African art br-This small anthropomorphic sculpture takes in miniature the canons of the statuary kongo. These figures form the vital embodiment of a spirit or ancestor, intermediate according to the Kongo religion between men and the god Nzambi. Very slight desication crack on the base. Light brown patina.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the group Kôngo , led by King ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory, copper and slave trade. Similarly, beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary with a codified gesture in relation to their worldview. The sorcerers nganga, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God called Nzambi by the ...


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240.00

Bronze Kongo statuette
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Statuette Congo

This small anthropomorphic sculpture, of kisi type, takes in miniature the canons of the Kongo statuary, and in particular the funerary statues inyongo or mintadi of lower Zaire, which were made of stone. These figures form the vital embodiment of a spirit or ancestor. Comes with plexi base.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the group Kôngo , led by King ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory, copper and slave trade. Similarly, beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary with a codified gesture in relation to their worldview. The sorcerers nganga, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God called Nzambi by the help of consecrated figures. To ...


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Kongo Yombe Pfemba Flycatcher
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Yombe Stick

A maternity figure pfemba , carved in the round, forms the handle of this prestigious flycatcher. The woman seated cross-legged, named phemba or pfemba, a symbol of the mythical ancestor, is likely associated with fertility cults. The child on her lap would embody the matrilineal transmission of power. Different faces adorn the middle section of the handle, while decorative motis are printed around the lower part. Lustrous black patina. The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombe were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rituals by means of carved fetishes nkondo nkisi.
The Yombe are established on the West African coast in the southwestern Republic of the Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable ...

Fetish statuette Nkisi Kongo Vili
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Fétiche Nkisi

The tribal fetishes of the Kongo kingdom have a magical charge lodged on the abdomen behind a mirror blocking a cavity. The statuette, which has no forearms, is also equipped with a backpack and a ceding headdress, in which magic ingredients have probably been introduced. Eyes with dark pupils are encrusted with glass in reference to extra lucid abilities. Speckled matte patina with residual inlays. Desication abrasions and cracks. The nganga, sorcerers but also healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God called Nzambi through these types of figures, most often consecrated anthropomorphic tribal sculptures, named nkisi.
Shez the Kongo, nganga took care of the rituals by activating a spiritual force with a nkondi (pl. nkissi). The term nkisi was then ...


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480.00

Kongo Nkangi Kiditu Crucifix
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Crucifix Kongo

Collection traditional African art French.
Among Kongo chiefs in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the crucifix stood among chieftain regalia as a symbol of power the authority. A ceremony at the investiture of the chief required the future ruler to receive from the hands of a dignitary, in a codified ritual, a nkangi kiditu . This insignia of power, inspired by ancient Christian crucifixes imported by the Portuguese in the 16th century, could also have had a therapeutic function, and, in addition to various uses, was brandished at funeral ceremonies during which the object was subjected to libations of oil or palm wine. Height on base: 29 cm.
The cross would not be a motif specific to the ...


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Figure of maternity Pfemba Kongo Yombé
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kongo figure

African statuette carved from the Kongo, this female effigy embodies the clan ancestor, a mediating figure.
The child would embody the matrilineal transmission of power.
The mouth is gaping, the eyes seem exorbitant, underlining the capacity of the ancestress to discern occult things. The use of this type of sculpture remains unknown. However, they frequently formed the motif carved at the top of the chiefs' canes. Dark brown lustrous patina. Abrasions.
A clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the West African coast, in the southwestern Republic of the Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternities. Among the Kongo , the nganga took charge of rituals by activating a spiritual force with a nkondi (pl. nkissi). The ...

Bronze Kongo statuette
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Statuette Congo

This small anthropomorphic sculpture, of kisi type, takes in miniature the canons of the Kongo statuary, and in particular the funerary statues inyongo or mintadi of lower Zaire, which were made of stone. These figures form the vital embodiment of a spirit or ancestor. Comes with plexi base.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the group Kôngo , led by King ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory, copper and slave trade. Similarly, beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary with a codified gesture in relation to their worldview. The sorcerers nganga, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God called Nzambi by the help of consecrated figures. To ...


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Kongo Yombe Mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Kongo Mask

Ex-Swiss African art collection.
This African mask was the prerogative of the nganga, soothsayer. His psychic abilities, which the Kongo thought they fostered through the taking of hallucinogenic substances, were revealed by the eyes of the hollowed-out pupils. Her tribal hairstyle is accentuated by a braided red cotton headband. These types of masks were called ngobudi in reference to a terrible, terrifying thing. The crusty surface reveals remnants of white and red polychrome coatings. These mediating masks, also present in initiation processes, were used by fetishists during healing rituals. At the same time, they were also used to identify individuals who, through their actions, could disrupt the harmony of the community. In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king ...


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Kongo Yombe polychrome mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Yombe Mask

Ex-collection British African art.

This African mask was the prerogative of the nganga, priest-devin. His mediumistic abilities, which the Kongo thought they were promoting by taking hallucinogenic substances, are revealed by the glassy look on black pupils. This type of mask was named ngobudi in reference to something frightening, terrorizing. These mediating masks, also present in initiatory processes, were used by fetishists during healing rituals. At the same time, they were also used to identify individuals who, through their actions, could disturb the harmony of the community. In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads of the borders between the current DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the ...

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Kongo Yombe Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Kongo Mask

This African mask was the prerogative of the nganga, priest-devin. Its mediumnic capacities, which the Kongo thought to favour thanks to the taking of hallucinogenic substances, are revealed by the look at the hollowed pupils. This type of mask was called ngobudi in reference to something frightening, terrorizing. These mediating masks, also present in initiatory processes, were used by fetishists during healing rituals. At the same time, they were also used to identify individuals who, through their actions, could disturb the harmony of the community. In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads of the borders between the current DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the Portuguese came into contact with the Kongo and ...


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150.00

Kongo figure
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kongo figure

In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads between the present-day DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the Portuguese came into contact with the Kongo and converted their king to Christianity. Although monarchical, the Kongo political system had a democratic aspect because the king was actually placed at the head of the kingdom following an election held by a council of tribal governors. This king, also called ntotela , controlled the appointment of court and provincial officials. The nganga, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation toward the God called Nzambi through consecrated figures called nkisi . The glazed eyes with dark pupils are associated with mediumistic qualities. Splits.


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Stick with Pfemba Yombe pattern
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Yombe Stick

Of Pfemba inspiration, the female effigy at the top embodies the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure, as evidenced by the rhombic scarifications of the bust. The Yombe indeed decorated their textiles, mats and loincloths, with this type of rhombic motifs in relation to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The open mouth exhibits traditionally filed teeth, and the wide eyes emphasize the foremother's ability to perceive the beyond, to discern hidden things. This type of statuette phemba , pfemba ,also adorned the top of prestige canes, mwala .
Satin patina.
Belonging to the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the West African coast, in the southwestern Republic of the Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternities. Among the ...


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290.00

Statuette Pfemba Congo Yombe
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Pfemba statuette

A sculpted miniature of the Kongo , this female effigy embodies the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure, evidenced by the scarifications of the bust. The child within embodies the matrilineal transmission of power. The Yombe adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, with diamonds in relation to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The mouth reveals traditionally lined teeth, the eyes seem exorbitant, underlining the ancestor's ability to discern occult things. The use of this type of sculpture remains unknown. They were, however, a frequent form of the pattern carved at the top of the heads' canes. Dark brown patina, ochre residue. Fissures.br /Clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in ...


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180.00

Kongo Nkisi figure
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kongo figure

African art Kongo.
The bilongo elements conferring additional powers to this pair of nkisi statuettes are hidden in a reliquary that closes a cauri on the abdomen and in the back of their seat, sealed by a mirror. Additions of metal, in the form of fine tips, participate in this action defensive or offensive. The caps consist of animal skin on which remains a coat and a red cotton headband. The teeth are traditionally filed down and the trance glance, able to discern the hidden things, is expressed by pupils visible through splinters of glass. Satin patina encrusted with matte particles. The magical "bilongo" ingredients were frequently hidden in the receptacle on the abdomen of the figure which was otherwise sealed by a mirror. The Nganga wizards, both healers, were in charge of ...


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Bakongo powder flask
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kongo Pear

The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombé were largely influenced by the Kongo Kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rituals, especially by means of carved fetishes nkondo nkisi.
Piriform container with a cap, intended to hold gunpowder for wooden rifles. This black powder was imported from Europe, making it a luxurious commodity that was carefully preserved. This powder, which was also attributed with magical virtues, often completed the ingredients of ritual fetishes. It is surmounted by a seated figure. This figure refers to the ancestors of the clan. Juxtaposition of decorative motifs engraved on the sides of the box. Slightly satin patina.
Ref : "La Maternité dans l'art d'Afrique noire" Massa ; "l'Art tribal d'Afrique noire" Bacquart.


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Kongo Yombe ancestor figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kongo figure

This statuette evoking the mythical ancestor of the Kongo is represented kneeling on a turtle, carrying a calabash. Kongo myths or proverbs illustrate the various qualities of prudence, longevity, etc., of the turtle. The deciphering of this type of sculpture requires knowledge of the Kongo sayings. Cracks of desiccation. Satin patina.
The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombé were largely influenced by theKongo kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rites, particularly by means of carved fetishes.
In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads of the present-day DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the Portuguese came into contact with the Kongo and converted their king to ...


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240.00

Kongo arrowhead coin
African art > Coins in bronze, black iron and other materials > Congo Currency

The blade of the sword, weapon of prestige then currency of transaction, surmounted a wooden handle. Oxidized patina. In Africa, before the colonial period, payments were never made in coins. Transactions were made with cowrie shells, beads, cattle, kola nuts, but also metals, especially iron. These primitive currencies were used for commercial and social exchanges, particularly for dowries, but could also be used as parade objects or throwing weapons. In Sierra Leone, goods were valued in relation to iron bars called barriferri. The king usually controlled the production or delivery of the kingdom's currency. The variety of these metal forms is wide, and they sometimes take the form of particularly aesthetic non-figurative sculptures.


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240.00





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