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African art - Kuba:




Kete Kuba Nyita Mask, Ngita
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Masque Cuba

Songye, Kete and Kuba influences mingle on this African hem mask associated with funeral rites. The horns refer to the braids that the notables wore in some tribes of Zaire, including the Kuba. The projection mouth, the oblique parallel stripes, the metal applications, are part of the peculiarities of the Songye Kifwebe masks ("boismasks"). A graphic made up of contrasting geometric patterns, combined with a mnemonic coded system, adorns the surface of the mask. Localized abrasions and dessication cracks are apparent. Restorations on the horns. The Kete, established between the Luba and Songye, mingled with the Kuba and Tschokwe and derive their livelihood from hunting, net fishing, and agriculture. Their matrilineal society worships nature spirits named mungitchi. Believing in ...


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180.00

Kuba/ Kété heaume mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Masque Cuba

"The people of the lightning and African tribal art
Despite the presence of criteria reminiscent of the great Royal Mask Kuba, this African mask is equipped with horns that would identify it as a variant of ngulungu masks (antelope). He appeared at the end of the male initiation rites to celebrate the return of young people to the community. Polychrome linear patterns pierce under a blackish patina, the mask having been visibly repainted for a new ritual. An embroidered cauris stripe borders the base of the object. Mate patina, irregular surface. Lack on the end of a horn. The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the Bushoong which are still ruled today by a king. The most prolific group of West Kasai African art, the Kuba, or lightning people, living in the southern part ...


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Kuba Ngeende Isheen Imalu Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Kuba mask

This Kuba mask of a warrior, not belonging to the royal masks, named Ishyeen imaalu and also Pwoom itok , belonged to the babende society.
. It has exorbitant conical pupils highlighted by horns that refer to warrior headdresses. Polychrome patterns alternate on the satin surface.
Slight chips in the patina.
Nature spirits, the ngesh, were believed to be embodied in Kuba masks during dances. The footprints of the dancers were then erased so as not to "hurt" the women venturing into the dance area. This mask appeared during initiation ceremonies, sometimes at the funerals of notables. The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the main Bushoong tribe, which is still ruled by a king today, and whose capital was Nshyeeng or Mushenge. More than twenty ...


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380.00

Kuba braided box
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kuba Basket

Circular box made of wickerwork, with a lid that fits together. The dense, elaborate weaving incorporates certain geometric patterns borrowed from scarification, also visible on shoowa raffia textiles. The inner edge of the lid is missing.

The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for the higher ranks of their society. The Lele live to the west of the Kuba kingdom and share common cultural characteristics with the Bushoong of Kuba country. Both groups decorate their prestige objects with similar motifs.
The extremely organized and hierarchical Kuba society placed at its center a king or nyim inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group.
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Source: Kuba, ed. 5continents, Binkley and Darish.


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150.00

Female figure Shoowa Bushoong
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Shoowa statuette

This shoowa statuette is a naturalistic figure of a kneeling woman holding a container. A very delicate work combining symmetrical and harmonious proportions. Smooth, glossy, black-brown patina. The Shoowa settled within the Kuba kingdom and gradually adopted certain traditions. Organized in a matrilineal society, the Shoowa are above all skilled weavers, renowned for their raffia textiles which they export to neighboring groups. But they are also potters and engravers.
The Kuba and the tribes settled between the Sankuru and Kasai rivers, including the Bushoong and Dengese also from the Mongo group, are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the higher ranks of their society. The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the Bushoong who ...


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240.00

Laket Kuba headdress
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Kuba headdress

This type of head ornament is worn on certain occasions by Kuba notables to highlight their wealth and prestige. Particularly careful workmanship characterizes this headdress.
A braided skullcap made of natural fibers is stretched over the textile, which is entirely filled with cowrie shells, applied harmoniously, creating a dense and regular network ending in a bouquet at the top. These shells, a barter currency originally imported from the Indian Ocean by Hausa merchants, are a symbol of fertility and abundance.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the higher ranks of their society. Indeed, several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined designs including cups, drinking horns and beakers. The Lele are ...


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180.00

Kasai s Shoowa woven panel
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Velours Cuba

Belgian African tribal art collection.
African art and the refinement of Kuba weaving.
Products to Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, a subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real paintings of first art, consist of a textile base in raffia on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by the contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the body scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases they took the value of money, or they also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the velvet weaving technique to Kuba ...


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120.00

Kuba/ Ngeende Bwoom helmet mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Kuba mask

The African primitive arts among "the people of lightning."
The voluminous royal mask Bwoom, also named Bongo among the Ngeende, represents the pygmy, the common man nicknamed Twa. Supposedly blind, a beaded ribbon masks his eyes. Animal skin and raffia cloth are stretched over the hollowed-out top of the head. According to Joseph Cornet, this mask was introduced during the reign of a Kuba king, the Nyim, who became insane after having the offspring of his predecessor murdered. Abraded matte patina. The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the Bushoong who are still ruled by a king today. More than twenty types of tribal masks are used among the Kuba or "people of lightning," with meanings and functions that vary from group to group. Ritual ceremonies were an ...

Carved cup Kuba Lele
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Lele cup

Among the prestigious objects of the Kuba groups, this cephalomorphic cup decorated with geometric motifs has a handle. Shiny patina. Damaged upper contours. Desiccation crack.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the higher ranks of their society. Indeed, several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined designs including cups, drinking horns and beakers. The Lele are established in the west of the Kuba kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers. Intercultural exchanges between the Bushoong of the Kuba territory and the Lele have made the attribution of certain objects difficult, as both groups use the same iconography, composed of faces with elaborate hairstyles and geometric decorative ...


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180.00

Bwoom Kuba/Ngeende mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bongo mask

African primitive arts among "the people of lightning."
The voluminous royal mask Bwoom, also named Bongo among the Ngeende, represents the pygmy, the common man nicknamed Twa. Supposedly blind, he is represented without eyeballs. Animal skin and raffia cloth are stretched over the top of the head, which is hollowed out. According to Joseph Cornet, this mask was introduced during the reign of a Kuba king, the Nyim, who became insane after having the offspring of his predecessor murdered. Abraded matt patina. The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the Bushoong who are still ruled by a king today. More than twenty types of tribal masks are used among the Kuba or "people of lightning," with meanings and functions that vary from group to group. Ritual ceremonies ...


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Masque Kuba / Nkutshu
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Kuba mask

Induction and Funeral Rites in African Art
More than twenty types of masks are used among the Kuba, with meanings and functions that vary from one group to another. Ritual ceremonies were the occasion to display decorative arts and masks to honor the spirit of the deceased or to honor the king.
Three types of masks have been associated with dances that take place in the royal enclosure: the first, called Moshambwooy, represents Woot, the founder of the Bushoong, the hero of the culture. The second, known as Nady Amwaash (Ngaady Un Mwash), embodies the wife/sister of Woot, a character that would have been introduced to give more importance to the role of women. The third mask is called Bwoom. As a character, Bwoom has been variously interpreted as a prince (the king's ...


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Kuba mask of illness
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Kuba mask

Supposed to embody a sick person, or a victim of witchcraft or paralysis, this mask has characteristic distorted features. Grainy matte patina.
Nature spirits, the ngesh, were believed to be embodied in Kuba masks during dances. The footprints of the dancers were then erased so as not to "hurt" the women venturing into the dance area.
The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the main Bushoong tribe which is still ruled by a king today, and whose capital was Nshyeeng or Mushenge. More than twenty types of tribal masks are used among the Kuba or "people of lightning," with meanings and functions that vary from group to group. Ritual ceremonies were an opportunity to display decorative arts and masks to honor the spirit of the deceased or to honor the ...


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160.00

Kuba cup
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba cup

Abundance of decorative carvings in African Kuba art.
The sides of the cup are decorated with a large frieze imbolo consisting of interlaced geometric patterns borrowed from scarification, also repeated on shoowa raffia textiles. Various forms of cups were carved whose ornamentation sought to glorify the qualities of their owners. Satin patina.
The extremely organized and hierarchical Kuba society placed at its center a king or nyim inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group.
This one was considered to be of divine origin. At the same time chief of the kingdom and of the Bushoong chieftaincy, he was attributed supernatural virtues stemming from sorcery or from the ancestors. He was therefore responsible for the survival of his subjects, whether it was through ...


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150.00

Kuba royal horn
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kuba horn

Carved cephalomorphic kuba horn with animal motifs. Its complex ornamentation was strictly reserved for objects associated with Bushoong royalty. The object is meticulously incised with geometric patterns related to body scarification, the designs of which are transferred in embroidery onto raffia textiles. The face evokes an ancestor in meditation.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the higher ranks of their society. The Lele live in the west of the Kuba kingdom and share common cultural characteristics with the Bushoong of Kuba country. Several Kuba groups indeed produced anthropomorphic objects with refined designs including cups, drinking horns and beakers. Smooth brown patina with mahogany highlights. Chips on the upper ...


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390.00

Masque Cuba
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Masque Cuba

This kuba mask or surrounding related groups, kete and bushoong, bears various artistically made decorative motifs. Polychrome patina.
The spirits of nature, the ngesh , were supposed to be incarnated in the Kuba masks during the dances. The dancers' footprints were then erased so as not to "bless" women venturing into the dance area.
The Kuba Kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the main tribe Bushoong , which is still ruled by a king, and whose capital was Nshyeeng or Mushenge.More than twenty types of tribal masks are used among the Kuba or " people of lightning", with meanings and functions that vary from group to group. Ritual ceremonies were an opportunity to display decorative arts and masks, in order to honor the spirit of the deceased or to honor the king. Three ...


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Kuba Lele sculpted cut
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba Cup

Among the prestigious objects, this cup with its contours carved with four faces in high relief and engraved with geometric motifs. The faces marked with scarification marks recall the features of the great Kuba royal masks. Matt surface coated with tukula pigments, red ochre.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the higher ranks of their society. Indeed, several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined designs including cups, drinking horns and beakers. The Lele are established in the west of the Kuba kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers. Intercultural exchanges between the Bushoong of the Kuba territory and the Lele have made the attribution of certain objects difficult, as both ...


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240.00

Kuba double headrest
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African art > Head rest > Kuba neck support

Within the Figurative sculpture of the Kuba, the prestigious objects held by members of the kuba royal family and the peripheral groups, Bushoong and Dengese, are always decorated with engraved motifs, parallel lines, intersecting, and checkerboards. The same geometric patterns, however, adorn objects for undidiidedul use, such as this headrest. Dark satin patina.
The Kuba Kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the main tribe Bushoong which is still ruled by a king, and whose capital was Nshyeeng or Mushenge.More than twenty types of tribal masks are used in the Kuba or Lightning People, with meanings and functions that vary from group to group. Ritual ceremonies were an opportunity to display decorative arts and masks, in order to honor the spirit of the deceased or to honor ...


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Kuba Pyaang mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Kuba mask

The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the Bushoong who are still today ruled by a king. It is the most prolific group in Western Kasai. More than twenty types of tribal masks are used among the Kuba or "lightning people", with meanings and functions that vary from one group to another. Ritual ceremonies remained the occasion to display decorative arts and masks to honor the spirit of the deceased or to honor the king. Most of these masks embody spirits of nature, guarantors of fertility and fecundity, called ngesh . Housed under deep arched eyebrows in the heart, the eyelids are incised. At the top, a small cylindrical protuberance was used to attach accessories such as feathers. The cut-out of the skull also illustrates the partially shaved Kuba hairstyles on the ...


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Lele Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Lele Mask

In the category of masks with a relatively flat structure, this Lele mask presents details carved into an elongated face, such as orbits surrounded by grooves and metal bands, a narrow nose and a small tubular mouth. The headdress, in slight relief, is engraved with intertwined lines. Beautiful smooth and lustrous patina, locally encrusted with ochre.
The Lele , neighbors of the Tschokwe and the Pende , live in the west of the Kuba kingdom and share common cultural characteristics with the Bushoong of Kuba country. Both groups adorn their prestige objects with similar motifs. Their society, headed by a " nymi" king, includes three classes, that of the Tundu or war chiefs, the Batshwa ("those who reject the Tundu authority"), and the Wongo called after the neighboring ethnic ...


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270.00

Cerelomoprhe Kuba/Lélé Cup
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kuba cup

Among the prestigious objects, this palm wine cup with its stylized handles. The sculpted face recalls the features of the great royal Kuba masks. Glossy surface inlaid with kaolin residues. Cracks of desiccation.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for the high ranks of their society. Indeed, several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined designs, including cups, drinking horns and goblets. The Lele settled in the western part of the Kuba kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers. Intercultural exchanges between the Bushoong of the Kuba territory and the Lele made the attribution of certain objects delicate, as both groups use the same iconography, composed of faces with elaborate hairstyles and ...


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150.00

Shoowa Kuba woven panel from Kasai
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Velours Kuba

African art and the refinement of Kuba weaving Produced in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, Kuba sub-group, these fabrics, which form true paintings of prime art, consist of a raffia textile base on which threads are cut flush, forming a velvet effect accentuated by the contrasts in tone. The geometrical patterns formed represent the body scarification of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases, they took on the value of money, or they also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who is said to have introduced the technique of velvet weaving to the Kuba country in the 17th century. He had ...


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120.00





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