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African art - Kuba:




Kuba pin
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kuba pin

French African art collection
In African art any everyday object can become an artistic support. Brown patina for this Kuba hairpin, surmounted by a face with finely sculpted features.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige items created for members of the high ranks of their society. Particularly organized and hierarchical, it placed in its center a king or nyim inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group. This was considered to be of divine origin. Both head of the kingdom and of the bushoong chiefdom, he was attributed supernatural virtues from witchcraft or ancestors. He therefore ensured the sustainability of his subjects, whether through harvests, rain or the birth of children. Source: Kuba, ed. 5continents, Binkley and Darish.


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Kuba cup
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African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba cup

Prestigious sculptures in African art kuba.
The anthropomorphic cut refers to a female ancestor. In the Kuba groups, a wide variety of carved cups with figurative motifs are intended to highlight the prestige of their holder. The character whose head is hollowed out here adopts compacted proportions.
Satin patina.


The extremely organized and hierarchical Kuba society placed a king or nyim at its center, inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group.
This was considered to be of divine origin. Both head of the kingdom and of the bushoong chiefdom, he was attributed supernatural virtues from witchcraft or ancestors. He therefore ensured the sustainability of his subjects, whether through harvests, rain or the birth of children. These magical attributes were ...


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240.00  190.00

Kuba Textile
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Kuba Textile

The African art and the refinement of Kuba weaving.
Produced in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, subgroup Kuba, these fabrics forming true paintings of primitive art, consist of a raffia textile base on which the geometric patterns formed represent the body scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases, they were used as currency, or followed their owners to the grave, covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the technique of velvet weaving to Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the Kuba to the art of blacksmithing. It was the men who softened the fibers of young ...


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120.00

Kuba cup
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba cup

The outline of this cephalomorphic cut is embellished with an imbolo frieze made up of geometric patterns referring to scarifications, also used on the shoowa raffia textiles. These different types of carved cups aim to enhance the prestige of their owners.
Satin abraded patina.

The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige items created for members of the high ranks of their society.
Particularly organized and hierarchical, it placed a king or nyim at its center, inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group.
This was considered to be of divine origin. Both head of the kingdom and of the bushoong chiefdom, he was attributed supernatural virtues from witchcraft or ancestors. He therefore ensured the sustainability of his subjects, whether through ...


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180.00

Pende Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Pende Mask

The Western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the eastern settled on the banks of the Kasai river downstream of Tshikapa. The influences of the neighbouring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu, were imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity the masks Mbuya , realistic, produced every ten years, take on a festive function, and embody different characters, including the chef, the soothsayer and his wife, the prostitute, the possessed, etc. The masks of initiation and those of power, the minganji, represent the ancestors and occur successively during the same ceremonies, agricultural festivals, initiation rituals and circumcision mukanda, induction of the chief. The Kipoko mask (also known as Mukishi wa Mutsue or Mbundju) is a ...


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160.00

Kuba mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Kuba mask

Belgian African art collection.
Called Ishyeenmaal, Ishendemale or even Pwoom itok, this African Kuba mask recalls the old hairstyle of Kuba warriors since worn by the chiefs. Projecting conical eyes may refer to the chameleon. The forehead evokes the characteristic hairstyles of Kuba women. The mask has a dark patina. Abrasions from use.
The most prolific group of African art from Western Kasai, the Kuba, or lightning people, developed their art around the royal person. This prestigious culture was made famous by its masks, including the large royal masks, very elaborate objects of power used as currency between groups. Also famous are their Ndop royal statuettes and the "velvets of Kasai". Over twenty types of masks are used, with meanings and functions that vary from group ...


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Kuba figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kuba figure

Incarnation of the king in Kuba African art sculpture. Character riding a lion. The object could symbolize, on the part of the sovereign or a dignitary, the subjugation of the spirits of nature and the mastery of danger. Velvety grayish brown patina.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige items created for members of the higher ranks of their society. The extremely organized and hierarchical Kuba society placed at its center a king or nyim inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group. This was considered to be of divine origin. At the same time head of the kingdom and of the bushoong chiefdom, "nyim", supernatural capacities resulting from witchcraft or ancestors were attributed to him. He therefore ensured the sustainability of his subjects, whether through ...


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280.00

Bushoong mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bushoong mask

Enthronement and Funeral Rites in African Art
More than twenty types of African masks are used among the Kuba, with meanings and functions that vary from group to group. Ritual ceremonies were an opportunity to exhibit decorative arts and masks, in order to honor the spirit of the deceased or to honor the king.
Associated with dances that took place in the royal enclosure, this exemplary is known as Nady Amwaash (Ngaady Un Mwash) and plays Woot's wife/sister, a character said to have been introduced in order to give more prominence to the role of women. The mask was accessorized with an ornament attached to the perforations of the upper contours of the face. Geometric patterns are painted. The blind eyes are separated by a ribbon of raffia sewn with beads symbolizing wealth and ...


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390.00

Kuba figure
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kuba figure

The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the high ranks of their society. The extremely organized and hierarchical Kuba society placed a king or nyim at its center, inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group. The Kuba and Kongo groups also made use of figurative sculptures associating mythical characters and animals or clan emblems.
Glossy brown patina. Erosions.
Among the Kuba clans, the Ngeende produced an abundance of prestige carvings, sometimes intended for neighboring groups. According to tradition, the Ngeende, who are said to be descended from the mythical ancestor Woot, came from the north of the Sankuru River. After being defeated by a Bushoong king, they joined the Kuba kingdom in the 16th century. They produced a ...


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Shoowa velvet panel from Kasai
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Kuba velvet

The African art and the refinement of Kuba weaving.
Produced in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, subgroup Kuba, these fabrics forming true paintings of primitive art, are made of a raffia textile base on which threads are cut short, forming a velvet effect accentuated by contrasts in tone. The geometrical patterns formed represent the ethnic group's body scarifications or the decorations of sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases, they were used as currency, or followed their owners to the grave, covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the technique of velvet weaving to Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the Kuba ...


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120.00

Kuba figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kuba figure

Embodiment of the king in the sculpture of African art Kuba. Of divine origin for his subjects, the king is represented sitting cross-legged on the royal platform, unable to touch the ground. Both head of the kingdom and of the bushoong chieftaincy, "nyim", supernatural abilities derived from sorcery or the ancestors were attributed to him. He was therefore responsible for the survival of his subjects, whether it was through the harvests, the rain or the birth of children. However, these magical attributes were not hereditary. Brown satin patina.
During the last days of the king's life, the memorial statue was placed at his bedside so that it would capture his vital energy as the object would outlive him. According to Cornet (1982), these statues were intended for ...


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240.00

Kuba mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Kuba mask

The African primitive arts among "the people of lightning."
The voluminous royal mask Bwoom, also named Bongo among the Ngeende, represents the pygmy, the common man nicknamed Twa. Supposedly blind, a beaded ribbon masks his eyes. Animal skin and raffia cloth are stretched over the hollowed-out top of the head. According to Joseph Cornet, this mask was introduced during the reign of a Kuba king, the Nyim, who became insane after having the offspring of his predecessor murdered. Abraded matte patina. The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the Bushoong who are still ruled by a king today. More than twenty types of tribal masks are used among the Kuba or "people of lightning," with meanings and functions that vary from group to group. Ritual ceremonies were an ...


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Lele Mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Lele Mask

In the category of masks with a relatively flat structure, this Lele mask presents details carved into an elongated face, such as orbits surrounded by grooves and metal bands, a narrow nose and a small tubular mouth. The headdress, in slight relief, is engraved with intertwined lines. Beautiful smooth and lustrous patina, locally encrusted with ochre.
The Lele , neighbors of the Tschokwe and the Pende , live in the west of the Kuba kingdom and share common cultural characteristics with the Bushoong of Kuba country. Both groups adorn their prestige objects with similar motifs. Their society, headed by a " nymi" king, includes three classes, that of the Tundu or war chiefs, the Batshwa ("those who reject the Tundu authority"), and the Wongo called after the neighboring ethnic ...


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Ndop statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ndop statue

Embodiment of the king in African Kuba art sculpture. Of divine origin for his subjects, the king is represented sitting cross-legged on the royal platform, unable to touch the ground. As head of the kingdom and of the Bushoong chieftaincy, "nyim", he was attributed with supernatural abilities resulting from sorcery or the ancestors. He was therefore responsible for the survival of his subjects, whether it was through the harvests, the rain or the birth of children. However, these magical attributes were not hereditary. Black satin patina. Abrasions.
During the last days of the king's life, the memorial statue was placed at his bedside so that it would capture his vital energy as the object would outlive him. According to Cornet (1982), these statues were intended for ...


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Etoffe Kuba Ntcak Nuseha Bushoong
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African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Textile Cuba

Prestigious fabrics among Kuba.
African art objects. Produced in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, mainly, subgroup Kuba, these fabrics forming true paintings of primitive art, consist of a textile base in raffia. The geometrical patterns formed represent the body scarification of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases, they took on the value of money, or they also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who is said to have introduced the technique of weaving to Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the Kuba to the art of forging. It was the men who ...

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Etoffe Ntcak Nuseha Bushoong Kuba
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African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Pagne Kuba

Prestigious fabrics among Kuba.
African art objects. Produced in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, mainly, subgroup Kuba, these fabrics forming true paintings of primitive art, consist of a textile base in raffia. The geometrical patterns formed represent the body scarification of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases, they took on the value of money, or they also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who is said to have introduced the technique of weaving to Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the Kuba to the art of forging. It was the men who ...

Showa velvet panel from Kasai
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African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Kuba velvet

The African art and the refinement of Kuba weaving.
Produced in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, subgroup Kuba, these fabrics forming true paintings of primitive art, are made of a raffia textile base on which threads are cut short, forming a velvet effect accentuated by contrasts in tone. The geometrical patterns formed represent the ethnic group's body scarifications or the decorations of sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases, they were used as currency, or followed their owners to the grave, covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the technique of velvet weaving to Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the Kuba ...

Kuba double headrest
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African art > Head rest > Kuba neck support

Within the Figurative sculpture of the Kuba, the prestigious objects held by members of the kuba royal family and the peripheral groups, Bushoong and Dengese, are always decorated with engraved motifs, parallel lines, intersecting, and checkerboards. The same geometric patterns, however, adorn objects for undidiidedul use, such as this headrest. Dark satin patina.
The Kuba Kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the main tribe Bushoong which is still ruled by a king, and whose capital was Nshyeeng or Mushenge.More than twenty types of tribal masks are used in the Kuba or Lightning People, with meanings and functions that vary from group to group. Ritual ceremonies were an opportunity to display decorative arts and masks, in order to honor the spirit of the deceased or to honor ...


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Kuba Bushoong Nibita mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Kuba mask

Short ringed horns point to the top of this Bushoong mask, a Kuba subgroup. It has half-closed eyelids, a triangular nose with a raised rib, and a protruding toothed mouth. Alternating diamond-shaped friezes are found on the surface. The cut of the headdress also illustrates the Kuba headdresses that are partially shaved at the temples.  A specificity: the motifs in relief representing horns, which frame the face. This mask is associated with initiation ceremonies. 
Satin patina.
The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the Bushoong who are still ruled by a king today. It is the most prolific group in western Kasai. In southern Kuba country, at the confluence of the Kasai and Lulua rivers, live the Biombo , whose traditional masked ceremonies bear ...


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Kuba statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kuba statue

Embodiment of the king in African Kuba art sculpture. Of divine origin for his subjects, the king is represented sitting cross-legged on the royal platform, unable to touch the ground. This statue considered magical was carved from termite-resistant wood. Symbols ibol associated with his reign, usually identify him. As both head of the kingdom and the Bushoong chieftaincy, "nyim", supernatural abilities derived from sorcery or the ancestors were attributed to him. He was therefore responsible for the survival of his subjects, whether it was through the harvests, the rain or the birth of children. These magical attributes were not hereditary. The meditative physiognomy is remarkably modeled, as are the careful details. Bright patina. Abrasions.
During the last days ...


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Etoffe Nshak, Ncak, Bushoong Kuba
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Pagne Kuba

Prestigious fabrics among Kuba African art objects Produced in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, mainly, sub-group Kuba, these fabrics forming real paintings of primitive art, are made of a textile base in raffia. The geometrical patterns formed represent the body scarifications of the ethnic group or take up the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases, they took on the value of money, or they also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who is said to have introduced the technique of weaving to Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the Kuba to the art of forging. It was the men who ...


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