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African art - Yoruba:

The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name Nago. They are patrilineal and practice excision and circumcision. Yoruba society is highly organized and has several associations with varying roles. While the male egbe society reinforces social norms, the aro federates the farmers. The gelede is more esoteric and religious. The notables meet in a society called esusu. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose after the disappearance of the Ifé civilization and still form the basis of the Yoruba political structure. The Oyo created two cults centered on the Egungun and Sango societies, which are still active and worship their multiple gods, the Orisa, through ceremonies using masks, statuettes, scepters and divination media. Source: "Yoruba" B. Lawal


Yoruba altar figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Yoruba

The female figure depicted sitting on a throne whose feet are parallel to the legs of the character, forms an incarnation of one of the many orisa of the Yoruba, equivalent to the Christian Saints. The miniature figures that surround him would be minor followers or deities. Crusty patina, mate. Lack on one of the braids of the hairstyle.
The Yoruba society is very organized and has several associations whose roles vary. While the egbe society is strengthening social norms, the aro unites farmers. The gelede has more esoteric and religious aims. The notables come together in a society called susu. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the disappearance of the civilization Ifé and are still the basis of the political structure of the Yoruba. The Oyos created two cults ...


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210.00

Epa Ekiti Yoruba Mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Yoruba Mask

The Ekiti of the northeastern part of the Yoruba region use polychrome heaumes masks associated with the Epa cult, illustrating the prosperity of the community.
They appear at funerals or rites of passage.
The base of the janiform mask, named ikoko, is surmounted by a tray, and then a second with serrated edges, on which various figures are erected. The release of these masks, which will have been painted by their owners, takes place every two years. Despite the weight of the masks, the dancers perform spectacular acrobatic demonstrations. These ceremonies are also supposed to increase fertility.
Polychrome crusty patina, abrasions. The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name Nago. ...


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Couple of statuettes Ere ibedji Yoruba
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ibedji statues

Featuring numerous protective adornments and accessories, these doll statuettes are (statues), the incarnation of twins, feature a conical hairstyle made of braids, tinged with indigo. The strings of currants symbolize values of wealth and fertility.
SPatine lustrous mahogany.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash it and feed it regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man also sometimes had ibeji for his wife in the hope of pregnancy. Supporting the twin's soul, ibeji influences the life of the family, becoming a source of benefit to his parents, ...

Statuettes Ere Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ibeji dolls

Ibeji statuettes, embodiment of the missing child in Yoruba African art.
Wide almond-shaped eyes, deep scarification on the faces, braids combined into a crest and identical physiognomies that illustrate the aesthetic traditions in Yoruba African art. Solidly encamped on circular supports, these twins wear pearl and cowrie shell ornaments and large metal rings, these elements being associated with the sacred. Chocolate patina, matte inlays.
In the language of the people Yoruba , ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. These African statuettes named ibeji are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of them; she can wash and feed them regularly. If she dies, the ...


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Ere Ibeji Yoruba figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba twins

These golden-brown sculptures, embodying twins, are accessorized with their "abiku" protective ornaments made of metal, shells and beads. Their characteristics link them to the egba style. Cracks of desiccation. Traces of indigo. In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, it is the remaining twin who takes over.
Sometimes a man would also have ibeji carved for his wife to induce pregnancy. Supporting the soul of the twin, the ibeji influences the life of the family, becoming a source of benefit to its parents, who continue to offer ...


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350.00

Yoruba Ere ibeji figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba figure

Adorned with its magical protective accessories, the "abiku", colored beads and cowries, this statuette-doll "ere" (statue), incarnation of a twin, was sculpted on the advice of the "babalawo". Patina shaded with browns.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. Sometimes a man would also have ibeji carved for his wife to induce pregnancy. As a carrier of the twin's soul, the ibeji influences the life of the family, becoming a source of blessings to its parents, who continue to offer prayers and ...


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240.00

Ibeji Yoruba beeldje
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba beeldje

The Ibeji, surrogate images in African art .
Traditionally carved from iroko, whose roots and leaves are also used for ritual purposes, this "ere" (statue) figure of a twin offers large eyes set with a brass pupil. Two-tone satin patina. In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, it is the remaining twin who takes over.
Sometimes a man would also have ibeji carved for his wife to induce pregnancy. Supporting the soul of the twin, the ibeji influences the life of the family, becoming a source of benefit to its parents, who ...


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180.00

Yoruba Ere Ibeji beeldje
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba beeldje

The Ibeji, surrogate images in African art
Standing on a circular base, this female effigy has large globular eyes inlaid with metal pupils, illustrating the aesthetic traditions of African Yoruba art. The fetishist has endowed her with talismanic jewelry meant to strengthen her power.
Grained two-tone platinum.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, it is the remaining twin who takes over.
It also happened that a man would have ibeji carved for his wife to induce pregnancy, the object deveant support of ...


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180.00

Yoruba maternity figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba figure

This sculpture of African tribal art is supposed to facilitate communication with the sacred, and reminds the divinity of its duties towards men. It symbolizes the protection of the people and fertility. Wearing a high crest, she also has the deep keloids of the Yoruba nobles on her face. The bulging eyes, fleshy lips, are also distinctive markers of Yoruba tribal statuary. Her finery, necklace and bracelets, reflect her social rank.
Grainy polychrome patina. The Yoruba practiced the slave trade with the Europeans and in particular the Portuguese before being completely subjugated to the British following a long period of internal struggles between the different kings or obas in place. The main Yoruba cults are the Gélédé , Epa , Ogboni , and the Esu cult, through which a ...


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240.00

Statuette Ere Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ibeji Yoruba

Wearing a headdress of braids, this male statuette, perched on a circular base, has a thick wooden torque and necklaces of various beads. The shiny patina is mahogany colored. Indigo pigments on the headdress. Carved according to the indications of the Ifa transmitted to the diviner, the babalawo, the Ibedji statuettes played the role of substitute for the death of the child. The statues are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of them; she anoints them with oil and feeds them regularly. If she disappears, the remaining twin takes over.
Considered as more than a physical representation of a loved one, linked to the cult of Shango, the ibedji statues are believed to influence the life and prosperity of the family, and the ...

Couple d  Ere Ibeji Yoruba Igbomina
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ibeji Twins

The ibeji in African art.

In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin.
This ibeji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over.
Considered as much more than a physical representation of a loved one, the ibeji influences the life of the family, that is why the family continues to pray to him and to dedicate cults and libations to him.
These pieces are among the most famous art objects of the Yoruba ethnic group. In fact, the occurrence of twinning in this ethnic group is stronger than anywhere else in Black Africa. This ...

Female figure Yoruba
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Yoruba

This sculpture of African tribal art represents by its attitude an image of fertility. Facilitating communication with the sacred, it reminds the deity of his duties to men. Through the child she carries behind her back she symbolizes the protection of her people and fertility. Wearing braids arranged in crests, it also sports the three deep keloids of the Yoruba nobles on each cheek. The globular eyes, fleshy lips, are also distinctive markers of the tribal statuary Yoruba.
A lack is noted on one shoulder, polychrome crusty patina.
The Yoruba traded slaves with the Europeans and especially the Portuguese before being completely subjugated to the English following a long period of infighting between the various kings or oba in place. The main Yoruba cults are the Gelede, ...


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Osé Sango Yoruba Scepter
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Osé Sango Yoruba Scepter

Ex-collection of Italian-African art

- Figure of adept of the god Sango, carried with the left hand during the ritual dances, it is topped with the double ax representing the axes of stone that the god would precipitate on the ground during the storms. The physiognomy is characteristic of Yoruba art, distinguished by the large almond-shaped eyes and the scarification of the cheeks, which represent, through their headdress, the god of thunder and youth Shango, or Sango. The mythical ancestor of the kings of Oyo, he was also the protector of the twins, whose occurrence was very frequent in the region. The Yoruba society is very organized and has several associations whose roles vary. The men's society egbe strengthens the social norms, the aro federates the farmers. The freeze ...


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Yoruba rider figure
African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Yoruba rider

It is in a carved statuette intended to appear on a Yoruba altar that is embodied here a deified ancestor, or one of the multiple gods, orisa, comparable to Christian saints. The latter animate the pantheon of the Yoruba, either the divine messenger Esù or Elégba . The equine, rare in the region, was an attribute of prestige that was reserved for the nobility and the rulers. This sculpture has certain constant elements and characteristics such as a mount with different proportions from the rider. The horse perched on a pedestal is indeed smaller in size. The character with a typically Yoruba face has triple incisions on his face, smokes a pipe and carries a spear. Shaded patina. Residues of kaolin. The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central ...


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180.00

Couple d  Ibeji Yoruba
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba figures

The Ibeji, substitute images in African art.
Traditionally carved from iroko, whose roots and leaves are also used for ritual purposes, these "ere" (statues) figures of twins take the form of a cube topped by a head. The pieces are linked by cowrie shell chains, constituting, in the same way as metal and pearls, the "abiku", protective ornaments. In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, it is the remaining twin who takes over.
Sometimes a man would also have ibeji carved for his wife to induce pregnancy. As a carrier of ...


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Yoruba polychrome maternity figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Yoruba

This sculpture of African tribal art was destined to be enthroned on an altar. Facilitating communication with the sacred, it reminds the divinity of its duties towards men. The child she holds on her lap symbolizes protection and fertility. Wearing a high crest, she sports the keloids of the Yoruba nobles. The bulging eyes, fleshy lips, are also distinctive markers of Yoruba tribal statuary. Misses on the base. Scabby patina locally flaked. Desiccation cracks. The Yoruba practiced the slave trade with the Europeans and in particular the Portuguese before being completely subjugated to the British following a long period of infighting between the various kings or oba in power. The main Yoruba cults are the Gélédé , Epa , Ogboni , and the Esu cult, through which a very wide ...


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280.00

Pair of Ibeji Yoruba statuettes
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba twins

The Ibeji, surrogate images in African art .
Traditionally carved from iroko, whose roots and leaves are also used for ritual purposes, these "ere" (statues) figures of twins take the form of a cube topped by a head. The pieces are linked by cowrie shell chains, constituting, in the same way as metal and pearls, the "abiku", protective ornaments. In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, it is the remaining twin who takes over.
Sometimes a man would also have ibeji carved for his wife to induce pregnancy. Supporting the ...


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Gelede Yoruba Crest Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Masque Gelede

Gelede in African art. Gelede mask showing a face topped with a double sagittal crest. In Nigeria, also in Benin, this African mask worn at the top of the head is used for the Gelede society's celebratory dances, and for the funerals of its followers. These masks occur in pairs, each with a specific name. Grainy patina, cracks and erosion from use. Gelede country in Nigeria pays homage to mothers, especially the older ones, whose powers are said to be comparable to those of the Yoruba gods, or orisa, and ancestors, osi and which can be used for the benefit but also for the misfortune of society. In the latter case these women are named aje. Masked ceremonies, through performances using masks, costumes, and dances, are meant to exhort mothers to use their extraordinary qualities ...


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250.00

Masque Yoruba Ekiti Epa
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Yorouba Mask

Ex-collection of British African art.
The Ekiti of the northeastern part of the yoruba region use polychrome heaume masks illustrating the prosperity of the community. The base of the mask, named ikoko, is surmounted by a maternity figure associated with one of the multiple gods orisa of the yoruba pantheon. These masks, painted by their owners, are released every two years. Despite the weight of the masks, the dancers perform spectacular acrobatic demonstrations. These ceremonies are also supposed to increase fertility. Crusty polychrome patina.
The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy the southwestern part of Nigeria and the central and southeastern part of Benin under the name of Nago. They are patrilineal and practice excision and circumcision. The kingdoms of ...


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450.00

Gelede crest mask
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African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Masque articulated

Ex-collection French African art.
This Bright Yellow Painted African Mask is shaped like a crest with raffia twigs. It was worn with a contours costume eroded at the base. The Gelede cult has become a contemporary heritage, based on ancestral traditions: the 'href'U'0022https://ich.unesco.org/en/RL/the-heritage-oral-gelede-00002"-Unesco has enrolled it in the PCI (Immaterial Cultural Heritage of humanity) in 2008 .
Regarding the ceremonies of the 'a href'"https://ich.unesco.org/en/RL/le-patrimoine-oral-gelede-00002"- Gelede , practiced mainly in the Western Yoruba kingdoms, masks are built on the same principle: a face (of the type mask-heaum) and a scene that develops on the top of the mask. These are used as part of masquerades dedicated to the "Mother Supreme " Iya ...


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Yoruba Medicine Pot
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Pot Yoruba

This pot of remedies, a basket covered with clay coating, closed by an anthropomorphic-patterned lid, was linked to the Ifa cult created by the Oyos of Nigeria and in connection with the egungun and Sango societies.
Used by the priest of Ifa, a sculpture relating to deities or orishas rises above the pot. Cauris, metal, and seed packets exacerbate the potency of the ingredients placed in the container.
Soruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name Nago. They are patrilineal, practice excision and circumcision. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the disappearance of the civilization Ifé and are still the basis of the political structure of the Yoruba. The Oyo created two cults centered ...


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340.00





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