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African art - Bamileke:

The Bamileke settled in the Grassland region of Cameroon, where the Bamoun also live. The Bamileke left Egypt in the 9th century and arrived in present-day Cameroon around 1150 AD. It was in the 14th century that the Bamileke people divided into two, the Bamoun in the Noun plain and the Bamileke in the Bafoussam region. The Bamileke chieftaincy is headed by a king called Fon or Fo, surrounded by a court of notables. Numerous secret societies participate in political and economic life by organising ritual cults.


Bamoun statuette
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bamoun statuette

Colors and chiefdoms in African art.
This statuette representing a male ancestor was first carved in wood and then covered with a rabane canvas inlaid with imported multicolored pearls. The physiognomy displays a distinctive expressiveness of African tribal art from the Grassland regions. Among the Bamiléké as in other ethnic groups, art objects testified to the place of their owner in society. Thus, the materials and shapes of objects varied according to social status. Located in the border region of Nigeria, the North-West province of Cameroon, Grassland  is made up of several ethnic groups: Tikar, Anyang, Widekum, Chamba, Bamoun and Bamileke . Several centralized chiefdoms, or kingdoms, based on customary associations, secret societies, are organized around the Fon who would ...


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280.00  224.00

Juju Hat
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Juju Hat

Collection of French African art
During the elephant dance ceremony, called tso, members of the Kuosi society, also known as Kwosi, sported these impressive headdresses. These headdresses were part of a multi-colored costume that included a large beaded mask with large circular ears, mbap mteng, a cloth cloth, ndop, decorated with monkey fur, and a leopard belt. These dances were usually performed during festive ceremonies and funerals. Initially made with parrot feathers, these hats today use wild guinea fowl feathers, the rarity of which results in a high cost.
The feathers are attached to wooden strips covered with fabric, arranged around a circular frame consolidated by a wicker fiber basket. Kosi society, which was originally composed of valiant warriors, evolved into ...


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150.00

Double Bamileke Ritual Bell
African art > Tam Tam, Djembe, musical instruments > Double Bamileke Ritual Bell

French African art collection.
Arms, jewellery, coins, metal objects are inseparable from traditional African art. Metallurgy is intimately associated with the founding myths of many African cultures, such as blacksmiths turned kings (Zaire), the anvil hammer being the symbol of power among the Luba. Cult accessories, the metal alloy gongs, some highly decorated, take on a wide variety of shapes. This double gong, in its simplicity, was a sacred instrument and the emblem of one of the many male societies of the peoples of Grassland, the Kwifoyn, whose headquarters adjoined the royal palace. The tinkling of wooden rods on hollow metal announced the beginning of ceremonies: communication with the supernatural world, ancestors, deities, could be established. Also prestigious objects, ...


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280.00

Juju Hat
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African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Juju Hat

Ex-collection of French African art
These imposing headdresses were traditionally worn by members of the Kuosi society, also known as Kwosi, during the elephant dance, tso. These headdresses were matched with a multi-colored costume including a large beaded mask with large circular ears, mbap mteng, a cloth cloth, ndop, decorated with monkey fur, and a leopard belt. The dances generally took place during festive ceremonies and funerals.
Initially made up of valiant warriors, Kosi society evolved into an association of wealthy notables acting in the name of royalty with the aim of regulating the social order. Headdresses were once made from parrot feathers, but today they use wild guinea fowl feathers, the rarity of which carries a high cost. The feathers are attached to ...


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150.00  120.00

Bamileke statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bamileke statue

Color and chieftaincy in African tribal art from the Grassland regions.
This ancestor statuette was carved in wood and then covered with a rabane cloth inlaid with imported multicolored beads. An ancient barter currency and symbol of wealth, beads are widely used in the royal art of the Grassland chieftainships.
Among the Bamiléké as in other ethnic groups, art objects testified to their owner's place in society. Thus, the materials and forms of the objects varied according to social status. The king Bamiléké , also called fon, guarantor of the fertility of the soil and the protection of his subjects, was not considered mortal. Because of this, his funeral was a joyous celebration, with the fon simply physically retiring but still watching over his people from his ...


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240.00  192.00

Juju Hat
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Juju Hat

Collection of French African art
The magnificent Bamileke headdresses in African art represent prestigious adornments worn by notables, and this particular example is decorated with bright red feathers. These impressive headdresses were traditionally worn by members of the Kuosi society, also known as Kwosi, during the elephant dance, tso. These headdresses were worn in conjunction with a multi-colored costume including a large beaded mask with large circular ears, mbap mteng, a cloth cloth, ndop, decorated with monkey fur, and a leopard belt. The dances generally took place during festive ceremonies and funerals.
Originally composed of valiant warriors, Kosi society evolved into an association of wealthy notables acting in the name of royalty with the aim of regulating the ...


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150.00

Bamileke Statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bamileke Statue

Colors and chiefdoms in African art.
This sculpted figure ("N'Kétuok") of a male royal ancestor was carved from wood then wrapped in rabane cloth inlaid with imported glass beads.
Among the Bamiléké as in other ethnic groups, art objects testified to the place of their owner in society. Thus, the materials and shapes of objects varied according to social status. King Bamiléké, also called fon, guarantor of soil fertility and the protection of his subjects, was not considered mortal. As a result, his funeral was a joyous celebration, the fon merely physically retiring but still watching over his people from his new home. Located in the border region of Nigeria, the North-West province of Cameroon, Grassland  is made up of several ethnic groups: Tikar, Anyang, Widekum, ...


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380.00  304.00

Bamileke Horn
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Bamileke Horn

Among the Bamiléké as in other ethnic groups, objects of African art testified to the place of their owner in society. The materials and shapes of objects varied according to social status. This palm wine cup was used by notables to conclude agreements during ritual ceremonies.
Located in the border region of Nigeria, the North-West province of Cameroon, Grassland is made up of several ethnic groups: Tikar, Anyang, Widekum, Chamba, Bamoun and Bamileke. Several centralized chiefdoms, or kingdoms, based on customary associations and secret societies, were organized around the Fon, which would have broad powers.


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180.00  144.00

Bamileke Statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bamileke Statue

Colors and chiefdoms in African art.
This sculpted figure ("N'Kétuok") representing a female ancestor with curvaceous shapes was carved in wood and then wrapped in a rabane cloth encrusted with imported glass beads. Some pearls are unstuck. br /> Among the Bamiléké as in other ethnic groups, works of art bear witness to the place of their owner in society. Thus, the materials and shapes of objects varied according to social status. King Bamileke, also called fon, guarantor of the fertility of the soil and the protection of his subjects, was not considered mortal. As such, his funeral was a joyful celebration, the fon merely physically retiring but still watching over his people from his new home. Located in the border region of Nigeria, the North West province of Cameroon, the ...


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280.00  224.00

Bamileke headdress
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Bamileke headdress

Sumptuous Bamileke headdresses in African art.
Prestigious African headdress, worn by notables, this example offers a trim of bright yellow feathers.
It was on the occasion of the elephant dance, tso ,that members of the Kuosi , Kwosi , society wore these impressive headdresses. They were worn over a multicolored costume consisting of a large beaded mask with large circular ears, mbap mteng ,a cloth fabric, ndop , decorated with monkey fur and a leopard belt. These dances were performed during festive ceremonies and funerals. The hats were once made from parrot feathers, now from wild guinea fowl, whose scarcity meant high cost. The feathers are attached to wooden strips covered with fabric, placed around a circular frame consolidated by a basket of wicker fiber. A ...


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Temporarily unavailable

Bamileke headdress
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Bamileke headdress

Sumptuous Bamileke headdresses in African art.
Prestigious African headdress, worn by notables, this example offers a trim of bright yellow feathers.
It was on the occasion of the elephant dance, tso ,that members of the Kuosi , Kwosi , society wore these impressive headdresses. They were worn over a multicolored costume consisting of a large beaded mask with large circular ears, mbap mteng ,a cloth fabric, ndop , decorated with monkey fur and a leopard belt. These dances were performed during festive ceremonies and funerals. The hats were once made from parrot feathers, now from wild guinea fowl, whose scarcity meant high cost. The feathers are attached to wooden strips covered with fabric, placed around a circular frame consolidated by a basket of wicker fiber. A ...


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Temporarily unavailable

statue Bamileke
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > statue Bamileke

Ex French private collection of African art.

The Bamiléké, a sub-group of a larger tribe also made up of the Bamoun and Tikar, excelled in the creation of multicolored beaded statues, a sign of prosperity and wealth, giving the royal object the brilliance that distinguishes it from common objects.

A basic structure is carved in wood and then covered with a lattice of beads whose colors correspond to the different chieftaincies.

Among the Bamileke, as in other ethnic groups, art objects testified to the position of their owners in the hierarchy of society. Thus, the materials and shapes of the objects varied according to social status. King Bamileke, also known as the Fon, who was the guarantor of the fertility of the soil and the protection ...


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6750.00  5400.00

Large bamileke beaded statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Large bamileke beaded statue

Ex private French collection of African art.

This imposing and exceptional beaded statue reaches 1m35. The Bamiléké, a subgroup of a larger people also made up of the Bamoun and Tikar, excelled in making multicolored beaded statues, a sign of prosperity and wealth, giving the royal object the brilliance that distinguishes it from the common objects.

A basic structure is carved from wood and then covered with a beaded lattice whose colors correspond to the different chiefdoms.

Among the Bamilékés as in other ethnic groups, the art objects attested to the position of their owner in the hierarchy of society. Thus, the materials and shapes of objects varied according to social status. King Bamiléké, also known as fon, guarantor of soil fertility and the ...


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9150.00  7320.00





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