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African art - Ewe:




Venavi Ewe Statuette
African art > _1 > Venavi Ewe Statuette

The Ewe consider the birth of twins Venavi (or Venovi) as a good and fortunate omen.

The twins must be treated equally and equitably.For example, both will be fed and washed at the same time and will wear the same clothes, If one of the twins dies, the parents buy a statuette to replace the deceased child, they usually buy it from a sculptor on the market and go to a wizard to The Venavi statuette will be of the same sex as the child it represents and replaces but projects itself into the future that the child will not have known by wearing adult features. small pieces of clothing and pearls testify to family belonging, here the piece is carved in a light wood and has a nice worn patina.The Venavi are the Togolese counterpart of Ibedji yor uba, Nigeria, because their ...


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350.00

Ewe ritual sculpture
African art > African Statues > Ewe figure

African art and tribal worship vodun ewe and fon populations.
Clipped in clay materials in which amulets in the form of seashells clump together, the straight busts of three statuettes follow one another in a wooden canoe. At the front, a small vase, receptacle of a dried fruit, is adorned with a metal ring. The fetishes are coated with kaolin and adorned with pearl necklaces. In Togo, African fetishes are part of rituals beneficial or evil according to the intentions of their owner. The fetishists, following the ritual of divination using palm nuts, make them to order to offer protective and medicinal virtues but also offer versions ready to use more traditional. These practices, which are still in use today, are sometimes decried and considered as animist and over by the time of ...


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450.00

Statuette Ewe Venovi
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African art > African Dolls > Ewe Doll

A Togolese version of the Ibedji fetish statuettes of The Yoruba of Nigeria, the fetish carved according to traditional conventions is simply enclosed by a textile held by a string. The object was ritually coated with indigo forming a thick film. Desication cracks. The Ewe consider the birth of twins called Venavi (or Venovi) as a happy omen. They must be treated equally and fairly. For example, both will be fed and washed at the same time and will wear the same clothes until puberty. If one of the twins dies, the parents obtain a statuette to replace the deceased child and turn to a fetishist to activate its magical virtues.
She will be of the same sex as the child she represents and replaces but plans into the future that the child will not have known by sporting adult traits. ...


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Couple of twins Venovi Ewe
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African art > African Dolls > Couple Ewe

A Togolese version of the Ibedji fetish statuettes of The Yoruba of Nigeria, the figures with stocky bodies rest on large rounded feet whose blackening indicates shoes. Glossy yellow ochre patina. Desication cracks. The Ewe , living in the coastal region west of the Volta and south of Togo, consider the birth of twins called Venavi (or Venovi) as a happy omen. They must be treated equally and fairly. For example, both will be fed and washed at the same time and will wear the same clothes until puberty. If one of the twins dies, the parents obtain a statuette to replace the deceased child and turn to a fetishist to activate its magical virtues.
She will be of the same sex as the child she represents and replaces but plans into the future that the child will not have known by sporting ...


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Female figure Ewe Venovi
African art > African Statues > Ewe Doll

A figure of the missing twin, this naked female statuette features a clear honey patina encrusted with white clay residue. The wood is cracked. The sculpture is atoped with very thin pearl necklaces, forming a sex cache at the pubis. One can note the patternofing of the large ears and the graceful assemblage of the braids.


The Ewe, often confused with the Minas, are the largest ethnic group in Togo. They are also found as minorities in Ghana, Benin, Côte d'Ivoire and Nigeria. Although little historical information is available about them, it seems that their location in their present location is the result of invasions and conflicts that erupted during the 17th century. The Ewe consider the birth of twins called Venavi (or Venovi) as a happy omen. They must be treated ...


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240.00

Fetish statuette Ewe Venovi
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African art > African fetish > Ewe Fetish

A Togolese version of the Ibedji fetish statuettes of Nigeria's Yoruba, the fetish carved according to traditional conventions is simply swaddled in animal skin now amulets in the form of hooked metal elements. Fertility-symbolizing cauris accessorize the room. The object was ritually coated with indigo and white clay forming a thick granular film. The Ewe consider the birth of twins called Venavi (or Venovi) as a happy omen. They must be treated equally and fairly. For example, both will be fed and washed at the same time and will wear the same clothes until puberty. If one of the twins dies, the parents obtain a statuette to replace the deceased child and turn to a fetishist to activate its magical virtues.
She will be of the same sex as the child she represents and replaces but ...

Ewe fetish statuette
objet vendu
African art > African Statues > Statue Ewe

In Togo, fetishes are part of beneficial or evil rituals according to the intentions of their owner. Fetishists make them to order to offer protective and medicinal virtues but also offer more conventional ready-to-use versions.
These practices are still in use today are sometimes decried and considered animistic and overgone in the age of Christianization and Islamization. Nevertheless, people tend to maintain animist practices despite their conversion to the great monotheistic religions, both beliefs influencing each other.

The Ewe, often confused with the Minas, are the most important ethnic group in Togo. They are also found as minorities in Ghana, Benin, Côte d'Ivoire and Nigeria. Although little historical information is available about them, it seems that their ...


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Statuette Ewe Venovi
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African art > African Statues > Twin Venavi

A Togolese version of Nigeria's Ibedji Yoruba, the statuette carved from light wood features rounded volumes and an ovoid face with protruding eyes. The sculptor's talent is revealed here by the realistic appearance of a child in spite of woman's breasts. A desication crack divides the bust, the feet are missing. Honey glossy patina.Ex. collection of the painter 'a target''blank' href''http://wiki.ibb.town/Karl-Heinz-Engstfeld' Karl Heinz Engstfeld and Ruth Engstfeld-Schremper, a greal artist.
The Ewe consider the birth of twins called Venavi (or Venovi) as a happy omen. They must be treated equally and fairly. For example, both will be fed and washed at the same time and will wear the same clothes until puberty.
If one of the twins dies, the parents obtain a statuette to ...


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Sold

Ewe Fetish
objet vendu
African art > African fetish > Ewe fetish

In Togo, fetishes are part of beneficial or evil rituals according to the intentions of their owner. The fetishists make them on order to offer protective and medicinal virtues but also offer ready-to-use versions.
These practices still in use at the present time are sometimes decried and regarded as animistic and are no longer used in the era of Christianization and Islamisation. Nevertheless, people tend to maintain animist practices despite their conversion to the great monotheistic religions, the two beliefs influencing each other.
The Ewe, often confused with the Minas, are the largest ethnic group in Togo. They are also found as minorities in Ghana, Benin, Ivory Coast and Nigeria. Although there is little historical information about them, it seems that their ...


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Ewe voodoo basket
African art > Usual african items > Ewe voodoo basket

Ex collection Belgian African art.

The basket has in its center a small altar for Mami Wata who is an ewe deity, mother goddess of the waters. We can find larger and more colorful representations reminiscent of mermaids in our culture. In the terracotta basket, around the central stage, a multitude of offerings are visible and libations accompany this tangle of materials and strings.

The Ewe, often confused with the Minas, are the most important ethnic group in Togo. They are also found as minorities in Ghana, Benin, Côte d'Ivoire and Nigeria.
Although little historical information is available about them, it seems that their location in their present location is the result of invasions and conflicts that erupted during the 17th century.

The Ewe ...


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290.00





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