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African art - Kongo:




Maternity figure Pfemba Kongo
African art > African Statues > Congo figure

Ex-collection Italian African tribal art.
>Tribal sculpture Kongo depicting a woman sitting cross-legged, supporting a child. She embodies the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure. The Yombe adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, with diamond patterns related to proverbs glorifying work and social unity, such as those that dot her bust. The mouth shows traditionally filed teeth and the gaze indicates the ancestor's ability to perceive the beyond, to discern hidden things. This type of statuette also adorned the top of the canes of prestige, mwala. Golden brown satin patina. Cracks and abrasions. Belonging to the group Kongo , the Yombe are established on the West African coast, in the southwest of the Republic of Congo and Angola. Their statuary includes ...


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390.00

Kongo Yombe polychrome mask
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African art > African mask > Yombe Mask

Ex-collection British African art.

This African mask was the prerogative of the nganga, priest-devin. His mediumistic abilities, which the Kongo thought they were promoting by taking hallucinogenic substances, are revealed by the glassy look on black pupils. This type of mask was named ngobudi in reference to something frightening, terrorizing. These mediating masks, also present in initiatory processes, were used by fetishists during healing rituals. At the same time, they were also used to identify individuals who, through their actions, could disturb the harmony of the community. In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads of the borders between the current DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the ...

Statuette Congo
African art > African fetish > Statuette Congo

Coll. Belgian African art br-This small anthropomorphic sculpture takes in miniature the canons of the statuary kongo. These figures form the vital embodiment of a spirit or ancestor, intermediate according to the Kongo religion between men and the god Nzambi. Very slight desication crack on the base. Light brown patina.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the group Kôngo , led by King ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory, copper and slave trade. Similarly, beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary with a codified gesture in relation to their worldview. The sorcerers nganga, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God called Nzambi by the ...


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240.00

Kongo settler statuette
African art > African Statues > Statuette Congo

Wearing a cap and a uniform, this colonist character adopts an attitude of "attention to you". Patina of different ochre browns. Missing under one foot.
In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads of the borders between the current DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the Portuguese came into contact with the Kongo and converted their king to Christianity. Although monarchical, the Kongo political system had a democratic aspect because the king was actually placed at the head of the kingdom following an election held by a council of tribal governors. The king, also known as ntotela, controlled the appointment of court and provincial officials. The nganga, both healers and healers, were responsible for religious ...


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180.00

Female figure Kongo Yombe Phemba
African art > African Statues > Phemba figure

The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombé were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rites, particularly through nkondo nkisi.
carved fetishes. This finely detailed female figure, wearing a dignitary's headdress, symbol of the mythical ancestor probably associated with fertility cults, is represented kneeling in an attitude of respect or supplication. Scarifications are scattered on her bust. These cuts, made with needles, knives and razors, were then coated with coal or ashes to accelerate healing and form prominent patterns. Abrasions. Matt patina.
In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads of the borders between the current DRC, Angola and Gabon. ...


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150.00

Kongo headrest
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African art > Head rest > Kongo neck press

Prestigious sculpture of the Kongo, this piece of furniture is formed of a figure of a Caryatid couple incarnating the ancestors of the clan, whose back bears diamond-shaped scarification. The child on the woman's lap would evoke the matrilineal transmission of power. The Yombe decorated their textiles, mats and loincloths with lozenges in relation to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The mouth reveals traditionally filed teeth, the eyes are whitened, underlining the ancestors' ability to discern occult things. Satin orange-brown patina. Abrasions and cracks.
Clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the West African coast, in the southwest of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternity wards.
In the ...


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Statue Kongo Nkisi Nkondi zoomorph
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African art > African Statues > Statue of Congo

African art Kongo and its spiritual receptacles
This zoomorphic figure borrows the traits of a chimpanzee and has a protective function, in Kongo tribal culture, against witchcraft. It is referred to as the U-022nkisi" object because the cylindrical receptacle on its abdomen is packed with magic ingredients "bilongo" (organic and plant matter). It is blocked by a mirror on which colored pigments and a resin have been applied. The animal is shown with hands clasped around a fruit, arms resting on the cavity of the bilongo. It is probably missing in the eye the pupils and shards of glass constituting the famous Kongo look indicating an extralucid ability, a vision of the afterlife. Cracked base. Satin patina on which libations have left dull and grainy deposits. In the 13th century, ...

Kongo Statue
African art > African Statues > Kongo Statue

Ex Belgian art collection.

This particular monoxyle piece is composed of a character whose feet are derived from a circular base keeping him in balance. At the back of the room is a large board to which the character seems tied by ties around the neck and ankles. The character is endowed with impressive and expressive facial features, in particular his fleshy open mouth revealing thick teeth. This statue could represent a convict at a judicial ceremony. In the thirteenth century, the Kongo people, led by his king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads between the current DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the Portuguese came into contact with the Kongo and converted their king to Christianity. Although monarchical, the Kongo political system presented a ...


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450.00

Maternity figure Kongo Pfemba
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African art > African Statues > Statue of Congo

African ritual objects have various appearances, such as this tribal sculpture of the Kongo , where a female effigy is about to breastfeed her child. She embodies the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure, as evidenced by the angular scarifications of the bust. The Yombe adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, of this type of pattern of orange motifs in relation to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The open mouth exhibits traditionally lined teeth, while the glazed gaze emphasizes the ancestor's ability to perceive the afterlife, to discern hidden things. This type of statuette also adorned the top of the prestige canes, mwala . Satin patina with warm reflections. Cracks.
Appding the Kongo group, the Yombe established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west ...

Kongo/Vili Nkisi fetish statuette
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African art > African Statues > Vili Fetish

The statuette with a bulbous abdomen containing a magic charge could be included in the category of therapeutic fetishes. The amalgam or bilongo introduced consisted of various ingredients from the natural environment including red clay, red wood powder tukula, white clay pembe... , but possibly human fragments such as teeth, nails, hair. This fetish of conspiracy was supposed to influence the health, prosperity, enemies of its holder. Among the Kongo, the specialist named nganga , took charge of the rituals by activating a spiritual force with a nkondi (pl. nkissi). The term nkisi was then used to refer to the terms 'sacred' or 'divine'.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo were the Kôngo group, led by king ntotela. Their kingdom ...

Kongo Yombe Mask
African art > African mask > Kongo Mask

This African mask was the prerogative of the nganga, priest-devin. Its mediumnic capacities, which the Kongo thought to favour thanks to the taking of hallucinogenic substances, are revealed by the look at the hollowed pupils. This type of mask was called ngobudi in reference to something frightening, terrorizing. These mediating masks, also present in initiatory processes, were used by fetishists during healing rituals. At the same time, they were also used to identify individuals who, through their actions, could disturb the harmony of the community. In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads of the borders between the current DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the Portuguese came into contact with the Kongo and ...


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380.00

Maternity figure Yombe Pfemba
African art > African Statues > Statue Yombe

Tribal sculpture of the Kongo , this female effigy seated in a tailor embodies the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure, evidenced by the orange scarifications of the back. The child on his lap embodies the matrilineal transmission of power. The Yombe adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, with diamonds in relation to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The mouth reveals teeth traditionally lined, the eyes are glazed, underlining the ability of the ancestor to discern occult things. Reddish varnished patina.
Clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternity.
Shach the Kongo, nganga was in charge of the rituals by activating a ...


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180.00

Statue of Congo Nkondi Nkisi
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African art > African Statues > Statue of Congo

This anthropomorphic sculpture accessorized with different elements added by the nganga is endowed with a magical ventral charge (bilongo). The glazed eyes symbolize foresight. Miss. Crusty patina.
These sculptures, anthropomorphic or zoomorphic, have long been classified as vengeful spirits, but their function is much more ambivalent. It is when the nganga completes the sculptor's achievement by pushing the nails into the nkonde that he acquires his magical charge. Its action is not a secret, its mission is on the contrary public. Once the evils and their culprit are determined, the nganga activates the strength of the nkonde by planting a nail or an iron blade, witnesses of the demand and especially of the agreement reached between the nganga and its client... often seen as ...

Yombe Drum Statue
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African art > African Statues > Statue Yombe

This figure seated in a suit, holding his sex with both hands, is surmounted by a drum adorned with a face carved in relief. Wide open, glazed eyes are recurrent in Kongo statuary. They are associated with psychic abilities. The mouths reveal traditionally lined teeth. The drum is stretched with animal skin nailed to the contours highlighted by a raffia braid. The crusty, dark surface has localized red and burgundy pigments adjacent to residues dotted with white clay. Misses on the back. This object evoking virility could be associated with the rites of circumcision and the music that accompanied it. However more than one function were usually assigned to Yombe sculptures.
In the 13th century, the people Kongo , led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads of ...


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Fétiche Kongo Nkondi Nkisi
African art > African fetish > Statue of Congo

Kongo African tribal art sculptures are illustrated by different expressive postures. The gesture opposite reflects a warlike and aggressive attitude, confirmed by the presence of multiple nails and blades with apotropaic but also offensive aim. The figure's physiognomy reinforces the threatening expression. The elements bilongo conferring additional powers to this statue are placed in the abdominal cavity which is obstructed by a mirror. Satin patina, abrasions and erosions of the base mainly.

Among the Kongo, the nganga performed rituals by activating a spiritual force with a nkondi (pl. nkissi). The term nkisi was then used to refer to the notions of "sacred" or "divine". The most influential category of "minkisi kongo" consisted of instruments designed to help ...


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Maternity figure Kongo Yombé Pfemba
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African art > African Statues > Statue Pfemba

African ritual objects have various appearances, such as this tribal sculpture of the Kongo , where a seated female effigy breastfeeds a child. She embodies the ancestor of the clan, a mediator figure, as evidenced by the losangic scarifications of the bust. The Yombe adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, with this type of losangic motif pattern in relation to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The open mouth shows off traditionally lined teeth, and wide-eyed, underline the grandfather's ability to perceive the afterlife, to discern hidden things. This type of statuette also adorned the top of the prestige canes, mwala . Satin patina with warm highlights. Fissures.Belonging to the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the west coast of Africa, in the southwestern ...

African Colon Kongo
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African art > African Statues > Colon

Wearing a colonial helmet, dressed in a suit with a clearly indicated fold of trousers, and wearing thick ankle boots, this character of 'colon' is represented in an assured attitude. An impression of vigour is rendered thanks to the narrowness of the waist contrasting with the extended shoulder span of the extended arms. The patina is matte, sandy, with residual kaolin inlays. Long desication crack in the back.
In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads of the borders between present-day DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the Portuguese came into contact with the Kongo and converted their king to Christianity. Although monarchical, the Kongo political system had a democratic aspect because the king was actually ...


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Kongo loom
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African art > Usual african items > Kongo Chicken

Collection Belgian African art.
Imprinted with realism, the sculpted figures of the kongo clans translate the will to capture supernatural forces or to symbolize the relationship between the earthly world and the spiritual powers to which individuals are directed. The figurative motif at the top of the object is a kneeling couple, naked and devoid of body scarification and jewelry. The physiognomies are characteristic of kongo, distinguished by a wide-open gaze pierced by a pupil. The presence of this couple also reminds us of their interdependence in the art of weaving, with the man doing the weaving and the woman the embroidery. Thread remains on the bobbin. Lustrous mahogany brown patina. The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the ...


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Fugure Kongo Nkisi Nkondi
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African art > African Statues > African statue Kongo Nkondi

Among the Kongo, nganga took care of rituals by activating a spiritual force with a nkondi (pl. nkissi). The term nkisi was then used to refer to the terms of 'sacred' or 'divine'. The most influential category of 'minkisi kongo' consisted of instruments to help regional leaders enforce the law. A metal object was nailed to a wooden figure as soon as a decision was made, each nail evoking a particular case: litigants, divorce, conflicts between communities... The nkondi wanted to ensure that the agreement to resolve the conflict was properly implemented, and that individuals feared the consequences of their behaviour. Its appearance thus personified the force residing there. From the second half of the 20th century, minkondi minkisi were strategically placed along the coasts of the Loango ...


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Kongo Yombe Cup with Pfemba pattern
African art > African Jar > Kongo Cup

Ex-collection Belgian African art.
This ritual container forms a prestigious object reserved for dignitaries. It is supported by a pfemba maternity figure, and its lid adorned with a male statuette, sculpted in round-bump. The cariatid, a figure of woman seated in a suit, named phemba or pfemba, symbol of the mythical ancestor, is probably associated with fertility cults. The child on his lap would embody the matrilineal transmission of power. The mouth reveals traditionally lined teeth, while the gaze emphasizes the ancestor's ability to discern occult things. Diamond scarifications cover the back of the character. These gashes, made with needles, knives and razors, were then coated with charcoal or ash to accelerate healing and form salient patterns. Golden light brown satin ...

Maternity figure Kongo Yombe Phemba
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African art > African Statues > Statue of Congo

Ex-collection Swiss African art.
The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombé were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom, from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious laughs through carved fetishes nkondo nkisi.
This figure of woman, wearing a dignitary's headdress, symbol of the mythical ancestor presumably associated with fertility cults, surrounds himself with a group of miniatures represented in various positions. The two figures on his shoulders feature an abdominal cavity in which a magical charge, bilongo, or relics have been introduced. The woman is seated on a seat supported by caryatids, which a janiform dog, koso , mediator between the living and the dead, also supports. Diamond scarifications cover the character's back. These cuts, made using ...





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