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African art - Kuba:




Etoffe Ncak nsueha Bushoong
African art > African Textile > Etoffe Ncak

Prestigious fabrics among the objects of African art Kuba
Products in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, mainly, subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a textile base in raffia. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the weaving technique to the Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the Kuba to the art of forging. It was the men who softened the fibers of young ...


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280.00

Masque Kuba Bushoong Isheen mwalu
African art > African mask > Masque Cuba

The spirits of nature, the ngesh , were supposed to be incarnated in the Kuba masks during the dances. The dancers' footprints were then erased so as not to injure the women venturing into the dance zone. The mask appeared during the initiation ceremonies, sometimes at the funerals of notables. Sculpted interpretation of the type of warrior mask Ishyeen imaalu (Pwoom itok), belonging to the society babende, adopts the exorbitant conical pupils, surrounded by perforations for vision, associated with the chameleon. It also offers highlights in the form of gold metal sheets, arranged on the mouth, on the frontal protrusion, on the cheeks, and in diamond on the temples. Black and Burgundy Pigments, Localized Abrasions . More than twenty types of tribal masks are used in the Kuba or " ...


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380.00

Masque Kuba Ishyeen imaalu
objet vendu
African art > African mask > Masque Cuba

Ex-collection French tribal art.
The rites of induction and funeral in African artThis mask embodying the man of the people, carved in dense wood, and intended, according to Cornet, for initiation ceremonies of young people, does not fall into the category of royal African masks. Torday and Joyce report that the Ngongo of the secret society babende used this mask in the company of the bundu and gore moashi . Called Ishyeenmaal , Ishendemale or Pwoom itok it sports conical pupils in projection, blind, evoking, according to some sources, the chameleon. The shaved, hydrocephalus forehead evokes the characteristic hairstyles of kuba women. An alternation of black and white checkerboards and areas of contrasting colors, slightly abrased, adorn the surface of the mask.
More than ...


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Large cut Kuba Lele cephalomorph
African art > Usual african items > Coupe Cuba

Among the prestigious objects, this palm wine cup whose handles are made up of the braids of the hairstyle of the carved effigy also has an anthropomorphic posterior handle. The flared base of the object is formed from the neck. The sculpted face has similarities with the features of large royal masks, Kuba. Checkerboard and diamond engravings complete the ornamentation. Patine mate abrasée.br-The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the high ranks of their society. Several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined motifs, including cups, drinking horns and cups. The Lele are established to the west of the Kuba kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers.The intercultural exchanges between the Bushoongs of Kuba ...


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130.00

Kasai Shoowa woven panel
African art > African Textile > Velours Cuba

The African art and refinement of the weaving Kuba Products in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, Kuba subgroup, these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a raffia textile base on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the technique of velvet weaving to the Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the ...


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120.00

Kasai Shoowa Velvet
African art > African Textile > Textile Cuba

Ex-collection Belgian tribal art.
African art and the refinement of Kuba weaving Produced in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, Kuba subgroup, these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a raffia textile base on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the technique of velvet weaving to the Kuba country in the 17th century. ...


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120.00

Kete Kuba Nyita Mask, Ngita
African art > African mask > Masque Cuba

Songye, Kete and Kuba influences mingle on this African hem mask associated with funeral rites. The horns refer to the braids that the notables wore in some tribes of Zaire, including the Kuba. The projection mouth, the oblique parallel stripes, the metal applications, are part of the peculiarities of the Songye Kifwebe masks ("boismasks"). A graphic made up of contrasting geometric patterns, combined with a mnemonic coded system, adorns the surface of the mask. Localized abrasions and dessication cracks are apparent. Restorations on the horns. The Kete, established between the Luba and Songye, mingled with the Kuba and Tschokwe and derive their livelihood from hunting, net fishing, and agriculture. Their matrilineal society worships nature spirits named mungitchi. Believing in ...


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390.00

Kasai Kuba Shoowa Velvet
objet vendu
African art > African Textile > Textile Cuba

Collection of French African tribal art.
African art and the refinement of KubaProducts weaving in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a raffia textile base on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the technique of velvet weaving to the Kuba country in the 17th ...


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Masque Kuba Mulwalwa Binji
objet vendu
African art > African mask > Masque Cuba

African arts at "the lightning people".
The mask Mulwalwa is used in male initiation rites in the southern Kuba region and embodies a spirit of nature, a ngesh controlling fertility and fertility in the eyes of the Kuba. A similar copy is listed at the Museum of Ethnology in Berlin. A protruding forehead housing exorbitant, conical pupils forms the specificity of this tribal mask. The latter evoke those of a chameleon and the power of the ngesh . An opening is the mouth, and the whole is crowned with a volume associated with a container of palm wine upside down. A symbol of inebriation, he warns of the potential danger of approaching it. Punctures were made around the edges of the room to attach the raffia adornment. Different geometric patterns, painted in contrasting tones, have ...


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Kuba/ Kété heaume mask
objet vendu
African art > African mask > Masque Cuba

"The people of the lightning and African tribal art
Despite the presence of criteria reminiscent of the great Royal Mask Kuba, this African mask is equipped with horns that would identify it as a variant of ngulungu masks (antelope). He appeared at the end of the male initiation rites to celebrate the return of young people to the community. Polychrome linear patterns pierce under a blackish patina, the mask having been visibly repainted for a new ritual. An embroidered cauris stripe borders the base of the object. Mate patina, irregular surface. Lack on the end of a horn. The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the Bushoong which are still ruled today by a king. The most prolific group of West Kasai African art, the Kuba, or lightning people, living in the southern part ...


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Kasai Kuba Shoowa Velvet
African art > African Textile > Textile Cuba

Collection of French African tribal art.
African art and the refinement of KubaProducts weaving in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a raffia textile base on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the technique of velvet weaving to the Kuba country in the 17th ...


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120.00

Coupe figurative Cuba
objet vendu
African art > Usual african items > Coupe Cuba

This cephalomorphic cut is made up of a scarred face evoking traditional body scarifications. An extended arm of one hand makes up the handle. The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the high ranks of their society. The Lee live to the west of the Kuba kingdom and share common cultural characteristics with the Bushoongs of the Kuba country. Several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined motifs, including cups, drinking horns and cups. Particularly sain-sainmedium brown patina. The highly organized and hierarchical kuba society placed a king or nyim in its centre inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group. This was considered to be of divine origin. Both head of the kingdom and the chiefdom bushoong , he was attributed ...


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Etoffe Ncak nsueha Bushoong
African art > African Textile > Pagne Kuba

Ex-collection French tribal art.
Prestigious fabrics among the objects of African art KubaProduce in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, mainly, subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a textile base in raffia. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the weaving technique to the Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the Kuba to the art of forging. It was the men who ...


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280.00

Kasai Kuba Shoowa Velvet
objet vendu
African art > African Textile > Textile Cuba

The African art and refinement of the weaving KubaProducts in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a raffia textile base on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the technique of velvet weaving to the Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the ...


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Kasai Kuba Shoowa Velvet
objet vendu
African art > African Textile > Textile Cuba

The African art and refinement of the weaving KubaProducts in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a raffia textile base on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the technique of velvet weaving to the Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the ...


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Kasai Kuba Shoowa Velvet
objet vendu
African art > African Textile > Textile Cuba

The African art and refinement of the Weaving KubaProducts in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a raffia textile base on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the technique of velvet weaving to the Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the ...


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Kasai Kuba Shoowa Velvet
objet vendu
African art > African Textile > Textile Cuba

The African art and refinement of the weaving KubaProducts in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a raffia textile base on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the technique of velvet weaving to the Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the ...


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Etoffe Ncak nsueha Bushoong
objet vendu
African art > African Textile > Pagne Kuba

Ex-collection French tribal art.
Prestigious fabrics among the objects of African art KubaProduce in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, mainly, subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a textile base in raffia. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the weaving technique to the Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the Kuba to the art of forging. It was the men who ...

Kasai Kuba Shoowa Velvet
objet vendu
African art > African Textile > Textile Cuba

The African art and refinement of the weaving KubaProducts in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a raffia textile base on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the technique of velvet weaving to the Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the ...


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Vase Cuba
African art > Usual african items > Kuba cup

Plenty of decorative sculptures in African art kuba
Supported by a cove and two female cariatid figures established on a circular base, the cut is engraved with geometric decorative motifs borrowed from the scarifications, also taken up on the textiles in raphia shoowa. The frieze imbolo , composed of intertwined lines, garnishes the edges of the cup. Various forms of cups were carved, the adornment of which sought to glorify the qualities of their owners. Matte patina abraded.
The highly organized and hierarchical Kuba society placed a king or nyim in its centre inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group.
This was considered to be of divine origin. Both head of the kingdom and of the bushoong chiefdom, he was attributed supernatural virtues from witchcraft or ancestors. ...


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490.00

Nshak Etoffe, Ncak, Nsueha Bushoong
objet vendu
African art > African Textile > Velours Cuba

Prestigious fabrics among the objects of African art Kuba
Products in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, mainly, subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a textile base in raffia. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the weaving technique to the Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the Kuba to the art of forging. It was the men who softened the fibers of young ...





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