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African art - Kuba:




Kasai Shoowa Velvet
objet vendu
African art > African Textile > Textile Cuba

Belgian African tribal art collection.
African art and the refinement of Kuba weaving.
Products to Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, a subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real paintings of first art, consist of a textile base in raffia on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by the contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the body scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases they took the value of money, or they also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the velvet weaving technique to Kuba ...


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Kasai Shoowa Velvet
objet vendu
African art > African Textile > Textile Cuba

Belgian African tribal art collection.
African art and the refinement of Kuba weaving.
Products to Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, a subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real paintings of first art, consist of a textile base in raffia on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by the contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the body scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases they took the value of money, or they also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the velvet weaving technique to Kuba ...


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Kasai Shoowa Velvet
African art > African Textile > Textile Cuba

Belgian African tribal art collection.
African art and the refinement of Kuba weaving.
Products to Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, a subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real paintings of first art, consist of a textile base in raffia on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by the contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the body scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases they took the value of money, or they also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the velvet weaving technique to Kuba ...


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120.00

Nshak Etoffe, Ncak Bushoong
objet vendu
African art > African Textile > Etoffe Nshak

Prestigious fabrics among the objects of African art KubaProduce d'in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, mainly, subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real first art paintings, consist of a textile base in raffia. The geometric patterns formed represent the bodily scarifications of the ethnic group or take over the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. They in many cases took value of money, or also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the weaving technique to the Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the Kuba to the art of forging. It was the men who softened the fibers of young ...

Kasai Shoowa Velvet
African art > African Textile > Textile Cuba

Belgian African tribal art collection.
African art and the refinement of Kuba weaving.
Products to Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, a subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real paintings of first art, consist of a textile base in raffia on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by the contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the body scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases they took the value of money, or they also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the velvet weaving technique to Kuba ...


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120.00

Etoffe Nshak, Ncak Bushoong
African art > African Textile > Pagne Nshak

Prestigious fabrics among The African Art Objects Kuba.
Products in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, mainly, Subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real paintings of first art, are made of a textile base in raffia. The geometric patterns formed represent the body scarifications of the ethnic group or take the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases they took the value of money, or they also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the weaving technique to Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the Kuba to the art of forging. It was the men who softened the fibers of ...


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280.00

anthropomorphic Cuba Bushoong cup
African art > Usual african items > Cuba cup

Among the prestigious objects held by members of the Kuba royal family and peripheral groups, such as Bushoong and Dengese, this stunning palm wine cup, remarkably made, features a head drawn on curved legs. The face recalls the morphology of the large royal Kuba masks with a flared hairstyle behind shaved temples. Checkerboard engravings complete the ornamentation. Dark satin patina.
The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the main tribe Bushoong which is still ruled by a king, and whose capital was Nshyeeng or Mushenge. More than twenty types of tribal masks are used in the Kuba or people of lightning, with meanings and functions that vary from group to group. Ritual ceremonies were an opportunity to display decorative arts and masks, in order to honor the spirit of ...


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240.00

Large cut Kuba Lele cephalomorph
objet vendu
African art > Usual african items > Coupe Cuba

Among the prestigious objects, this palm wine cup whose handles are made up of the braids of the hairstyle of the carved effigy also has an anthropomorphic posterior handle. The flared base of the object is formed from the neck. The sculpted face has similarities with the features of large royal masks, Kuba. Checkerboard and diamond engravings complete the ornamentation. Patine mate abrasée.br-The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the high ranks of their society. Several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined motifs, including cups, drinking horns and cups. The Lele are established to the west of the Kuba kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers.The intercultural exchanges between the Bushoongs of Kuba ...

anthropomorphic Cuba Lele cup
African art > Usual african items > Cuba cup

Among the prestigious objects held by members of the kuba royal family, this type of palm wine cup with a handle is built on a base of legs. The sculpture features the hairstyle in the shape of ram horns on either side of the face, which also refers to the fact that only the nyim (king) and his entourage could own sheep. The face recalls the morphology of the great royal Kuba masks. Checkerboard engravings complete the ornamentation. Dark satin patina.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestigious objects created for members of the high ranks of their society. Several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined motifs, including cuts, drinking horns and cups. The Lele s established in the west of the Kuba Kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele ...


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180.00

Peace Knife Ikula kuba
African art > Usual african items > Kuba Knife

Male accessory, the Ikula knife (peace knife) is not a weapon but a symbol of social status. This symbol of authority was very little sharpened. The Kuba blacksmiths were able to draw inspiration from the knives of Benin, whose shape is similar, introduced by the Dutch. It was following a royal decree that wooden knives appeared, the king forbidding iron on full moon nights. The handle is made of metal, the shared blade of a raised rib is streaked with parallel grooves highlighting the shape of the object. The wooden handle is artistically adorned with traditional ethnic motifs that abraded usage.brSever tribes make up the Kuba group, established between the Sankuru and Kasai rivers: Bushoong,Ngeendé, Binji,Wongo,Kété, etc. Each of them has produced a variety of sculptures, statues, ...


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250.00

Kuba Shoowa Velvet from Kasai
African art > African Textile > Velours Cuba

The African art and refinement of Kuba weaving, produced in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, a subgroup Kuba, these fabrics forming real paintings of first art, consist of a textile base in raphia on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by the contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the body scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases they took the value of money, or they also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the velvet weaving technique to Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously ...


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110.00

Kuba Ikul Knife
objet vendu
African art > Usual african items > Ikul Knife

The Ikula knife (peace knife) is not a weapon but a symbol of social status. This symbol of authority was very little sharpened. The Kuba blacksmiths were able to draw inspiration from the knives of Benin, whose shape is similar, introduced by the Dutch. It was following a royal decree that wooden knives appeared, the king forbidding iron on full moon nights. The blade is open with geometric patterns reminiscent of the polychrome checkerboards adorning the masks of the ethnic group. The handle is made of wood, its decorative engravings are abraded, giving an elegant grey patina.
Severy tribes make up the Kuba group, established between the Sankuru and Kasai rivers: Bushoong, Ngeendé, Binji, Wongo, Kété, etc. Each of them has produced a variety of sculptures, statues, prestigious ...


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Kasai Kuba Shoowa woven panel
African art > African Textile > Textile Cuba

The African art and refinement of Kuba
Produced weaving in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real paintings of first art, consist of a textile base in raffhia on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by the contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the body scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases they took the value of money, or they also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the velvet weaving technique to Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously ...


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120.00

Kasai Shoowa Velvet Panel
African art > African Textile > Velours Cuba

Belgian African tribal art collection.
African art and the refinement of Kuba weaving.
Products to Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, a subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real paintings of first art, consist of a textile base in raffia on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by the contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the body scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases they took the value of money, or they also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the velvet weaving technique to Kuba ...


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120.00

Masque Bushoong Cuba Isheen imaalu
African art > African mask > Masque Cuba

Belgian African art collection.
The spirits of nature, the ngesh , were supposed to be incarnated in the Kuba masks during the dances. The dancers' footprints were then erased so as not to 'injure' women venturing into the dance area. The mask appeared during the initiation ceremonies, sometimes at the funerals of notables. This warrior mask, not belonging to the royal masks, named Ishyeen imaalu and also Pwoom itok , belonged to the company babende. It features exorbited conical pupils highlighted by horn-shaped eyebrows that refer to warriors' hairstyles. Natural pigments, matte, harmoniously juxtaposed, numerous abrasions of use, break on the upper outline and native internal restorations.
The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the main tribe Bushoong which is ...


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280.00

Kuba dignitary hairstyle
African art > Headdress Hat > Hair Kuba

African art Kuba.
-Coiffe consisting of raffia textile with a rigid circular frame. symbolizing wealth and fertility.
The Kuba and the tribes established between the Sankuru and Kasai rivers, including the Bushoong and Dengese also from the Mongo group, are renowned for the refinement of the prestigious objects created for members of the high ranks of their society. Several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic ceremonial objects with refined motifs, including cuts, drinking horns and cups. The Kuba, whose name means Lightning also produced African tools and weapons, including jet knives, which eventually became transaction values, and heavy war swords, Ilwoon. The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the Bushoong which are still ruled by a king today. It is the most ...


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280.00

Effigy Ndop Bushoong
African art > African Statues > Statuette Ndop

Incarnation of the king in African art Kuba
These sculptures reproducing in a reduced version the large effigies of Ndop kings were intended to promote births. Locally chipped black skate. Low desication cracks.
Suring origin for his subjects, the king with the visor hairstyle shody is depicted sitting in a suit on the royal stage, unable to touch the ground. This statue considered magical was carved from termite-resistant wood. The symbol ibol associated with his reign, allowing him to be identified, is here a scepter surmounted by a bird figure. As leader of both the kingdom and the bushoong chiefdom, 'nyim', supernatural abilities from witchcraft or ancestors were attributed to him. He therefore ensured the peregity of his subjects, whether through the harvests, the rain or ...


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290.00

Statuette Cuba
African art > African Statues > Statuette Cuba

A small version akin to statues of Ndop rulers, it features a notable kneeling of the kuba court, wife or ancestor of royal blood. The scarified motifs, inscribed in relief on his face, recall the drawings adorning some of the kuba masks associated with the mythology of the group. These masks occur during dances accompanying funeral ceremonies for deceased insiders. Piece acquired in a gallery by the owner in 1980.
Patine lustrous caramel. One of the feet is missing. Orifice on the back for a ritual purpose?
Severy tribes make up the Kuba, whose name means clair, established between the Sankuru and Kasai rivers: Bushoong, Ngeendé, Binji, Wongo, Kété, etc. Each of them has produced a variety of sculptures associated with royalty, statues, prestigious objects, masks, frequently ...


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380.00

Kasai s Shoowa woven panel
African art > African Textile > Textile Cuba

Belgian African tribal art collection.
African art and the refinement of Kuba weaving.
Products to Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, a subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real paintings of first art, consist of a textile base in raffia on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by the contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the body scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases they took the value of money, or they also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the velvet weaving technique to Kuba ...


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120.00

The The Cuban Bushoong
objet vendu
African art > African Statues > Statue Ndop

Incarnation of the king in African art Kuba
Suring divine origin for his subjects, the king with the visor hairstyle shody is depicted sitting in a suit on the royal stage, unable to touch the ground. This statue considered magical was carved from termite-resistant wood. Symbols ibol associated with his reign, allowing him to be identified, surround him, in this case a game, the lywl . Small effigies are usually slave figures. As leader of both the kingdom and the bushoong chiefdom, "nyim", supernatural abilities from witchcraft or ancestors were attributed to him. He therefore ensured the perreanity of his subjects, whether through the harvests, the rain or the birth of the children. These magical attributes, however, were not hereditary.
In the last days of the king's life, ...


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Kuba Shoowa Velvet from Kasai
objet vendu
African art > African Textile > Textile Cuba

Belgian African tribal art collection.
African art and the refinement of Kuba weaving.
Products to Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, a subgroup Kuba , these fabrics forming real paintings of first art, consist of a textile base in raffia on which threads are cut to the brim, forming a velvet effect accentuated by the contrasts of tone. The geometric patterns formed represent the body scarifications of the ethnic group or the decorations of the sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases they took the value of money, or they also followed their owners into the grave by covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the velvet weaving technique to Kuba ...





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