This weekend: free shipping in all Europe Shengen - Country list

...
Search option




Discover our exceptionnal items

African art - Markha:




Marka/Bambara mask of N tomo
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Masque Bamana

Ex-collection of French African art.

This African Bambara mask is surmounted by a female figure. Parallel horns encrusted with cowries, whose even number would indicate that it is a female mask, also rise to the top. The oblong face, highlighted with fine scarification patterns, is asserted by an imposing bushy nose that dominates prominent lips. The brown patina gives this piece a matte and velvety appearance.
One finds the Bambara , Bamana , in central and southern Mali. This name means "unbeliever" and was given to them by the Muslims. They belong to the large group Mande , like the Soninke and Malinke. Animists, they also believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala, who has 266 sacred attributes. One, for each day of the 9 lunar months ...


View details

180.00

Large Markha mask of the N tomo
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Markha Mask

Ex-collection of French African art.

This African mask of the Marka people has a tubular face rising from a large forehead with stylized excrescences, interlocking animal figures and small parallel horns. Specificity of the sculptures marka, the metal in the form of engraved strips and long rods framing the nose, is associated with wood. Matte light brown patina, velvety . Slightly oxidized metal.
In African art, the Marka , Maraka in Bamana, Warka , or Sarakolé, are Muslim city-dwellers of Soninke origin, established in the south of Niger, scattered since the end of the empire of Ghana in Mali, Mauritania and Senegal. They now speak Bamana and have adopted many of the Bambara traditions, such as the Ntomo and Kore, initiation societies that used masks in their ...


View details

350.00

Markha mask of the N tomo
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Markha Mask

A narrow face with a long rectangular nose dominating a reduced, protruding mouth, housed in the tip of the chin. These features, underlined with inlaid brass leaves, form the specificity of the sculptures marka. Slightly mottled matt patina.
In African art, the Marka , Maraka in Bamana, Warka, or Sarakolé, are Muslim city-dwellers of Soninke origin, established in the south of Niger, scattered since the end of the empire of Ghana in Mali, Mauritania and Senegal. They now speak Bamana and have adopted many of the Bambara traditions, such as the Ntomo and Kore, initiation societies that used masks in their ceremonies. The sculptors of Bambara and Marka African art are part of the Numuw, which are not ethnically bound and are free to settle wherever they wish. ...


View details

250.00

Masque Markha, Warka
Sold item
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Markha Mask

A narrow face with a rectangular nose surmounting a thin protruding mouth, a tapered jaw, this sculpture inlaid with brass leaves is a specificity of marka sculptures. Abraded matte patina.
In African art, the Marka , Maraka in Bamana, Warka, or Sarakolé, are Muslim city-dwellers of Soninke origin, established in the south of Niger, scattered since the end of the empire of Ghana in Mali, Mauritania and Senegal. They now speak Bamana and have adopted many of the Bambara traditions, such as the Ntomo and Kore, initiation societies that used masks in their ceremonies. The sculptors of Bambara and Marka African art are part of the Numuw, which are not ethnically bound and are free to settle wherever they wish.


View details

Sold

Masque Markha, Warka
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Marka Mask

For example, coll. tribal art belge.br> This anthropo-zoomorphic mask with a narrow jaw has a rectangular nose surmounting protruding lips. A crenellating crest caps the face. Metal veneers usually adorn these masks, in this case parallel incisions adorn the surface.
Grainy brown inpatine on a light abraded wood, desication cracks. Height on a base: 77 cm.
In African art, the Marka , Maraka en Bamana, Warka, or Sarakolé, are Muslim city dwellers of Soninke origin, settled in southern Niger, scattered since the end of the Ghana Empire in Mali, Mauritania and Senegal. They now speak bamana and have adopted much of the Bambara traditions, such as Ntomo and Koré , initiation societies that used masks during their ceremonies. The sculptors of African art Bambara and Marka are part ...


View details

Make offer

490.00

Markha mask of Ntomo
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Markha Mask

This mask with a slender jaw has a rectangular nasal ridge surmounting a narrow prominent mouth. Specificity of the sculptures marka, metal in the form of sheets highlighting the volumes of the face, is embellished with parallel strokes and punctuated with dotted lines. Speckled and matte patina, velvety. Slightly oxidized metal.
br>In African art, the Marka , Maraka en Bamana, Warka, or Sarakolé, are Muslim city dwellers of Soninke origin, settled in southern Niger, scattered since the end of the Ghana Empire in Mali, Mauritania and Senegal. They now speak bamana and have adopted much of the Bambara traditions, such as Ntomo and Koré , initiation societies that used masks during their ceremonies. The sculptors of African art Bambara and Marka are part of the Numuw , who are not ...


View details

280.00

Masque facial Markha
Sold item
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Markha Mask

A narrow face where the nasal ridge overcomes a thin protruding mouth, a pointed jaw, this sculpture marked with brass leaves is a specificity of the sculptures marka. Slightly speckled matte patina.
In African art, the Marka , Maraka en Bamana, Warka, or Sarakolé, are Muslim city dwellers of Soninke origin, settled in southern Niger, scattered since the end of the Ghana Empire in Mali, Mauritania and Senegal. They now speak bamana and have adopted much of the Bambara traditions, such as Ntomo and Koré , initiation societies that used masks during their ceremonies. The sculptors of African art Bambara and Marka are part of the Numuw , who are not related to an ethnic group and are free to establish themselves wherever they want.


View details

Sold

Markha, Warka mask
Sold item
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Markha Mask

This African mask with a face has a pointed jaw. The nasal ridge, rectangular, dominates a small protruding mouth. The ears and crest are embellished with beads attached to cotton fiber pompoms. The side stair motifs feature the braids of traditional hairstyles. Metal sheets, incised with parallel strokes and hammered with dotted lines, the specificity of the sculptures marka, follow the volumes of the face.
Spotted and dull, velvety. Oxidized metal.
In African art, the Marka , Maraka en Bamana, Warka, or Sarakolé, are Muslim city dwellers of Soninke origin, settled in southern Niger, scattered since the end of the Ghana Empire in Mali, Mauritania and Senegal. They now speak bamana and have adopted much of the Bambara traditions, such as Ntomo and Koré , initiation societies ...


View details

Sold

Markha Crest Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Markha Mask

From the dome that forms the base of the object rises a ringed neck with a long emaciated face plated with brass slats. Bringing together animal and human details, this mask recalls both the mask N'tomo and the crest Ci Wara relating to the antelope. The top rises in a curved tip lined with pom poms. Zoomorphic ears are also embellished with pom poms and cauris. Skate mate, velvety. Greyed brown patina.

Markha are organized into structured and hierarchical mask societies as is found in many other ethnic groups. They have an initiation language, a means of communication in the hands of insiders. The Markha, also known as Warka , inhabit the northern Bambara territory and have, therefore, been influenced by them especially in the design of their masks. The Markha, like the ...


View details

350.00

Markha Bambara polychrome hem mask
Sold item
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bamanat Mask

The dome that forms the base of the mask is topped by a long emaciated face whose ringed neck ends in the posterior part. Bringing together animal and human details, this mask recalls the Ci Wara cimiers promoting fertility. It has a curved flat horn. Multicolored geometric patterns and graphic symbols are painted on this mask, likely in relation to the sixteen signs used in geomancia in the Bambaras. The zigzag lines would represent the movements of the sun, with certain angles showing the cardinal points, with each additional element participating in the reading of these signs. Polychrome patina, desication cracks, polychromy abrasions.

Markha are organized into structured and hierarchical mask societies. They have an initiation language, a means of communication in the ...

Masque facial Markha, Warka
Sold item
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Markha Mask

According to S. Diakonoff, this African mask with pompom buckles would be used in the association of the N'tomo, which includes uncircumcised youth. It is often topped with horns symbolizing the degree of the nature of knowledge. The forehead is extended in height of a crested hairstyle flanked by tiered side mats. A nose with a straight edge dominates a narrow mouth with open lips. Brass sheets engraved and hammered in the repulsed, characteristic of the marka sculptures, cover part of the mask. Oxidized and speckled patina.
br-The Marka, Maraka en Bamana, or Warka , are Muslim city dwellers of Soninke origin, based in southern Niger. They now speak bamana and have adopted much of the Bambara traditions, such as Ntomo and Koré , initiation societies that used masks during their ...

Mask helmet janiforme Markha
Sold item
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Mask helmet janiforme Markha

The Markha in African art.

These two longiform brass-plated faces meet at the top in a single ridge topped with multicolored pompoms. On either side of the crest, strips of red cloth, held by openwork strips of tin, cover the helmet. Typical of the marka and bambara sculpture, the noble rectilinear nose, organ of the senses and sociability, is enhanced by metal strips. A small mouth ajar lips projecting on the chin. Metal and wood are speckled by oxidation, giving a beautiful patina to this heavy piece. The Markha are organized into structured, hierarchical mask societies as found in many other ethnic groups. They have an initiatory language, a means of communication in the hands of the initiates. The Markha, also called Warka, live in the north of Bambara territory and have ...

Markha Bambara polychrome hem mask
Sold item
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Markha Mask

The anterior face of the dome that forms the base of the mask has breast-like growths, topped with a long emaciated face whose ringed neck ends in the posterior part. Bringing together animal and human details, this mask recalls the Ci Wara cimiers promoting fertility. It has a crenellated horn at the top. Multicolored geometric patterns and graphic symbols are painted on this mask, likely in relation to the sixteen signs used in geomancia in the Bambaras. The zigzag lines would represent the movements of the sun, with certain angles showing the cardinal points, with each additional element participating in the reading of these signs. Polychrome patina, crack on one ear.
Markha are organized into structured and hierarchical mask societies. They have an initiation language, a means ...

Do you want to hide sold items ? if yes, click HERE
Masque facial Markha, Warka
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Markha Mask

In African art, the Marka , Maraka in Bamana, Warka, or Sarakolé, are Muslim city dwellers of Soninke origin, settled in southern Niger, scattered since the end of the Ghana empire in Mali, Mauritania and Senegal. They now speak bamana and have adopted much of the Bambara traditions, such as Ntomo and Koré , initiation societies that used masks during their ceremonies. The sculptors of African art Bambara and Marka are among the Numuw , who are not related to an ethnic group and are free to establish themselves wherever they wish. This mask with a narrow jaw has an imposing nasal edge surmounting protruding lips. A stylized crest covers the face. Replacing the metal classically adorning these masks, geometric incisions were finely engraved on the wood.
ne brown oiled on a light ...


View details

240.00

Petit masque Markha, Warka
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Markha Mask

The small mask, on the other hand, was used by the association of the N'tomo grouping uncircumcised youth. Carved from dense wood, it is framed by elements depicting the braids on either side of a stylized crest. The nose, the central point of the face between the heavy lowered eyelids, is also the organ of sociability. Dark, oily skate, abraded locally on a light wood.
The Marka , Maraka en Bamana, or Warka , are Muslim city dwellers of Soninke origin, established in southern Niger, north of the Bambara territory and have, therefore, been influenced by the latter especially in the design of their masks. In addition to the points of similarity between Markha and Bambara art, they also have in common institutions. They now speak bamana but have an initiation language, a means of ...


View details

180.00

Markha Mask, Maraka
Sold item
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Markha Mask

African mask with a matte patina abraded, plated with sheets of oxidized metal. A long, narrow, emaciated face supported by a ringed neck rises from the back of a spherical base. Bringing together animal details, antelope, and humans, this African mask recalls ci Wara crests. The head is topped by a high, flattened horn, similar to a headdress. Horizontal ears, tapered, are equipped with buckle and beaded buckles and cotton stamps, absent on the second ear. Cracks in desications.
The Markha are organized into societies of structured masks and hierarchical as found in many other ethnic groups. They have an initiation language, a means of communication in the hands of the initiates. The Markha , also known as Warka, live in the northern bambara territory and have, therefore, been ...


View details

Sold

Masque facial Markha
Sold item
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Masque Warka

According to S. Diakonoff, this African mask is used in the N'tomo association of uncircumcised young people. It is often topped with horns symbolizing "the degree of the nature of knowledge. "The forehead is extended to the height of a crest hairstyle flanked by tiered side mats. A long rectangular nose dominates a narrow mouth to the open lips. Brass leaves engraved with the repulsed, characteristic of Marka sculptures, cover part of the mask. Oxyand and speckled skates.br-The Marka, Maraka en Bamana, or Warka , are Muslim city dwellers of Soninke origin, established in southern Niger. They now speak bamana and have adopted much of the Bambara traditions, such as Ntomo and Koré , initiation societies that used masks during their ceremonies. The sculptors of African art Bambara and Marka ...


View details

Sold

Masque facial Markha
Sold item
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Markha Mask

In African art, the Marka , Maraka en Bamana, Warka, or Sarakolé, are Muslim city dwellers of Soninke origin, established in southern Niger, scattered since the end of Ghana's empire in Mali, Mauritania and Senegal. They now speak bamana and have adopted much of the Bambara traditions, such as Ntomo and Koré , initiation societies that used masks during their ceremonies. Sculptors of African art Bambara and Marka are part of the Numuw , who are not linked to an ethnic group and are free to settle wherethey wish.
This mask with a long jaw has a rectangular nasal ridge overlooking a narrow, prominent mouth. The ears and crest are embellished with beads adorned with cotton fiber pompoms. The side patterns on the stairs feature the braids of traditional hairstyles. Metal sheets, incised ...


View details

Sold

Masque facial Markha
Sold item
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Markha Mask

In African art, the Marka, Maraka en Bamana, Warka, or Sarakolé, are Muslim city dwellers of Soninke origin, established in southern Niger, scattered since the end of Ghana's empire in Mali, Mauritania and Senegal. They now speak bamana and have adopted much of the Bambara traditions, such as Ntomo and Koré , initiation societies that used masks during their ceremonies. Sculptors of African art Bambara and Marka are part of the Numuw , who are not linked to an ethnic group and are free to settle wherethey wish.
This long-faced mask has a straight nasal ridge overlooking a narrow, prominent mouth. A spiked chin extends the jaw. Ears and summit crest are embellished with pearls adorned with cotton fiber pompoms. Metal sheets, incised with parallel lines and punctuated with dotted ...


View details

Sold

Markha Crest Mask
Sold item
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Masque Warka

Beautiful very old piece, Baraldi collection. The detail of the face here is remarkable, by the drawing of the aquilin nose and the metal hemmed eyes. From the dome that forms the base of the object rises a ringed neck and then a long emaciated face plated with brass slats. Bringing together animal and human details, this mask recalls both the mask N'tomo and the crest Ci Wara relating to the antelope. The top rises in crenellated flat horn with cabochons and copper diamonds. The ears, horizontal, are embellished with pompoms and cauris. Patine mate, velvety. The metal tops acquired a particularly satin touch over time and ritual anointings.
The Markha are organized into societies of structured masks and hierarchical as found in many other ethnic groups. They have an initiation ...


View details

Sold

Masque Markha, Warka
Sold item
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Markha Mask

Symbols of fertility and fertility in the African art of Markha
The anterior face of the dome constituting the base of the object has growths indicating breasts. A narrow, emaciated face, lined with chiseled metal sheets, rests on the mask cap. Its long ringed neck forms a nascent vault of the posterior. Bringing together animal details, antelope, and humans, this African mask recalls Ci Wara masks. In the crest, a high flat horn curves backwards. Horizontal ears, tapered, are perforated and equipped with cotton buckles and pompoms. Cracks in desications. The Markha are organized into societies of structured masks and hierarchical as found in many other ethnic groups. They have an initiation language, a means of communication in the hands of the initiates. The Markha , also known ...


View details

Sold





Previously viewed items
African art  -  Brussels - Paris - London

© 2021 - Digital Consult SPRL

Essentiel Galerie SPRL
73 Rue de Tournai - 7333 Tertre - Belgique
+32 (0)65.529.100