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African art - Yoruba:

The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name of Nago. They are patrilineal, practice excision and circumcision.


Cavalier Yoruba Sango
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African art > African Statues > Statue Yoruba

Representations of horsemen are very common in The African Yoruba Art, and for good reason, it is the central theme of history called "The Death and The Cavalier of The King".
This fiction tells the funeral of the late King of Oyo, a former African state founded in the 15th century, neighbor of the kingdom of Dahomey, and the tradition that his rider, Elesin, must commit suicide within thirty days of the death of the king in order to follow Yoruba religious dogma. The death of the rider is indeed intended to guarantee the king a safe drive to his new home.
Elesin, a simple man enjoying life, is given a mission he does not want and ends up disappointing the Yoruba people who place high expectations in him.

It was this myth that inspired the sculptor to make this ...


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Coupe Agere Ifa Yoruba
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African art > African Rider > Yoruba Cup

In the Yoruba pantheon, Orunmila is the deity of the which is consulted in case of problems through the divination ifà via the soothsayer babalawo (iyanifà for a woman). Intended to stand on the altar of the god, this sculpture consists of a cup that contained the sacred palm nuts and a rider figure. The character would embody Esu or Elegba , divine messenger who unites orisa to men. Cracks on the pot.
Centrée on the veneration of her gods, or orisà, the religion yoruba relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages ( aroko). They are designed by sculptors at the request of followers, soothsayers and their clients. These spirits are supposed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the disappearance of the civilization Ifé ...


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Female figure Yoruba
African art > African Statues > Statue Yoruba

This sculpture of African tribal art represents by its attitude an image of fertility. Facilitating communication with the sacred, it reminds the deity of his duties to men. Through the child she carries behind her back she symbolizes the protection of her people and fertility. Wearing braids arranged in crests, it also sports the three deep keloids of the Yoruba nobles on each cheek. The globular eyes, fleshy lips, are also distinctive markers of the tribal statuary Yoruba.
A lack is noted on one shoulder, polychrome crusty patina.
The Yoruba traded slaves with the Europeans and especially the Portuguese before being completely subjugated to the English following a long period of infighting between the various kings or oba in place. The main Yoruba cults are the Gelede, ...


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400.00

Sceptres Shango
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African art > Sceptre > Sceptres Shango

J.Putteners Private Collection.

The Oshe of the yoruba are used in ritual dances. These are carried in the left hand by the dancers. These figures represent the god of thunder and youth Shango, or Sango. The latter is the mythical ancestor of the kings of Oyo.
Sango was also the protector of the twins, whose occurrence was very common in the region.
Tha is a deity feared for its unpredictability. It is revered because it brings beneficial rains to crops. It is also attributed to him that women's fertility is attributed.

A kneeling figure forms the top of each of these royal insignia, one with a ritual offering cup, the second wearing a loincloth and holding a yam, a symbol of abundant harvests. Both sport the distinctive jugular scarifications of the ...


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Statue Shango Yoruba
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African art > African Statues > Statue Yoruba

African art Shango
This effigy of tribal art, a follower of the god Shango , judging by the double headdress and the ornaments it is adorned with, sits in order to make offerings. The emblem of the god of lightning and social justice, Shango , is a set of stone axes that he is supposed to throw from the sky during storms. The deities of the rivers are also represented by stones and by the water of the rivers associated with them. This stylized headdress representing stone axes signals the connection between the male sky and the female earth, while the child behind its back symbolizes lineage. Dark matte patina, protrusions whose luster reveals a light golden brown. The company yoruba is very organized and has several associations whose roles vary. While egbe men's society reinforces ...


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Yoruba Ere Ibeji commemorative statuettes
African art > African Statues > Statuettes Ibeji

The Ibeji, substitute images in African art. Traditionally carved in iroko, whose roots and leaves are also used for ritual purposes, these "ere" figures (statues) of twins are in the form of a cube topped by a head. The pieces are connected by cowries, constituting, just like metal and pearls, the "abiku", protective ornaments.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over.

Plateau de divination Opon Ifa Yoruba
African art > Usual african items > Plateau Yoruba

Supports of the ritualist named babalawo (or Babalao, or Babaal-wo, pronounced Baba-a-l'wo), priest of Ifa, in the Yoruba language, these trays exist in three forms, including the circular ( opon ribiti) such as this copy which was used in Abomey. They are intended for ifa, a system of divination that represents the teachings of the orisha Orunmila, orisha of Wisdom. The babalawo claim to be securing the future through their communication with Orunmila. In Yoruba thought in Nigeria and in Benin, orishas form a variety of divine spirits controlling natural forces. They are found mainly in Yoruba cosmogony but more widely in East West Africa in the diasporas of Central and South America. The center of the tray, aarin opon , forms a picture in which the dust of wood allows the soothsayer to ...

Gelede mask
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African art > African mask > Gelede mask

Gelede in African art. Gelede mask adorned with a bird, harvested in situ by the late Jacques Anquetil , a theatre man who became 'a href'https://www.youtube.com/watch?v-U11uL7JBpEQ' master weaver initiated by the Dogon, president of the French Crafts. In Nigeria, also in Benin, this African mask worn at the top of the head is used for Gelede's rejoicing dances, and for the funeral of its followers. These masks occur in pairs, each with a specific name. A single scarification adorns the cheeks here. Similar copies with no tether holes in the case of Yoruba, Rivallain and Iroko, ed. Hazan. Patine mate, beautiful preservation of the original painting. Desication cracks.
The Gelede country in Nigeria pays tribute to the mothers, especially the oldest of them, whose powers would ...


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Ere Ibeji Yoruba fetish couple
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African art > African fetish > Yoruba Fetishes

Ex-collection Italian African art.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. It also happened that a man would have ibeji carved for his wife to induce pregnancy. Supporting the soul of the twin, the ibeji influenced the life of the family, becoming a source of benefits for his parents, who continued to pray to him and to dedicate cults and libations to him. This is a variant of the Ibeji Era with a cubic body into which a magical charge was introduced. Necklaces of cowries, symbols of fertility and ...

Statuette Ere Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African Dolls > Statuette Ibeji

Wearing braids in conical buns, this female statuette depicted perched on a circular base, features a thick metal torque, wide rings on the wrists. Crusty libation residues clustered on the surface. Indigo pigments remain on the headdress. Sculpted according to the Ifa indications transmitted to the soothsayer, the babalawo , the Ibedji statuettes played the role of substitute for the death of the child.
The statues are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of it; they anoint them with oil and feed them regularly. If it disappears it is the remaining twin who takes over.
Puted as much more than a physical representation of a loved one, linked to the cult of Shango, the ibedji statues are supposed to influence the life and ...

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Pearl head in terracotta
African art > African Terracotta > Beaded head

Made in the Cameroonian Grasslands using the traditional decorative technique using multicolored glass beads, this head reproduces the famous effigies of sovereigns. Meticulously applied to a terracotta surface, the beads accentuate the features and the royal headdress with strongly contrasting colours, while padouk powder lifts the inside of the ears and mouth.
In African art, the artistic current of which these sculptures are part is named after the ancient religious capital of Nigeria, Ifè, one of the many city-states established by the Yoruba.This civilization succeeded the Nok civilization. This city-state of Ilé-Ifé, whose rise culminated from the 12th to the 15th century, had an artistic tradition of royal portraits imbued with realism, funerary effigies in bronze but also in ...


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150.00

Osé Sango Yoruba Scepter
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African art > Usual african items > Osé Sango Yoruba Scepter

Ex-collection of Italian-African art

- Figure of adept of the god Sango, carried with the left hand during the ritual dances, it is topped with the double ax representing the axes of stone that the god would precipitate on the ground during the storms. The physiognomy is characteristic of Yoruba art, distinguished by the large almond-shaped eyes and the scarification of the cheeks, which represent, through their headdress, the god of thunder and youth Shango, or Sango. The mythical ancestor of the kings of Oyo, he was also the protector of the twins, whose occurrence was very frequent in the region. The Yoruba society is very organized and has several associations whose roles vary. The men's society egbe strengthens the social norms, the aro federates the farmers. The freeze ...


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Masque facial Yoruba
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African art > African mask > Yoruba Mask

Mask with a rounded pattern, broad luscious lips and stretched almond eyes pierced with a pupil. From the spherical skull, to the clear forehead, rises a frontal crest with a tip cut from parallel bands. Wealth and therefore prestige are reflected here, in African thought, through the treatment of the chin in bulging volumes suggesting the abundance of flesh. Underneath is a grooved collar. Locally chipped grainy skate.
The Yoruba society is very organized and has several associations whose roles vary. While men's society egbe reinforces social norms, the aro unites farmers. The gelede has more esoteric and religious aims. The notables come together in a society called esusu. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the demise of the Ifé civilization and are still ...


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Couple of twins Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African Statues > Ibedji Yoruba

Here, the "abiku", adornments with a protective purpose, can be found here in each of the characters carved into coloured pearl necklaces, cauris chains, and metal bells. These statuette-dolls "ere" (statues), evoking twins, feature a hairstyle formed of braids gathered in a sagittal crest.
Satric glossy surface.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man sometimes had ibeji for his wife to sculpt in order to arouse pregnancy. Supporting the soul of the twin, the ibeji influences the life of the ...

Altar with rider Yoruba
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African art > African Statues > Statue Yoruba

Glorifying an ancient deified king, a rider figure surrounded by servants forms the central subject of the scene established on a circular plateau supported by four feet. This sculpture is associated with the cult sango symbolized by a double axis. The equine, rare in the region, was an attribute of prestige that was reserved for the nobility and the sovereigns. At the top an arch connecting the heads is carved from an iguana or crocodile surrounded by snakes. Focused on the veneration of his gods, or orisà, the religion yoruba relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). They are designed by sculptors at the request of followers, soothsayers and their clients. These spirits are supposed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare. Grainy dark patina with revealed ...


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Yoruba Polychrome Maternity
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African art > African Maternity > Yoruba Polychrome Maternity

This female tribal altar art sculpture features a well-preserved polychromy. She is depicted sitting in a seat on a circular base. Facilitating communication with the sacred, it reminds the deity of its duties to men. Through the child she holds on her lap, she symbolizes the protection of her people and fertility. Wearing a high crest, she also wears the three deep keloids of the Yoruba nobles on each of the cheeks. The globular eyes, fleshy lips, are also distinctive markers of Yoruba tribal statuary. Her attire, necklace and bracelets, reflect her social rank.
Sensitable, a matte, grainy patina covers the wood, which is desiccized due to cracking.
The Yoruba engaged in the slave trade with the Europeans and in particular the Portuguese before being completely subsermissed ...

Yoruba rider statuette
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African art > African Rider > Cavalier Yoruba

This figure of a rider glorifies a deified ancestor. The equine, rare in the region, was also an attribute of prestige that was reserved for the nobility and sovereigns. Focused on the veneration of his gods, or orisà, the religion yoruba relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). They are designed by sculptors at the request of followers, soothsayers and their clients. These spirits are supposed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare.Patine satiny black brown, orange reflections.
Soruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name Nago. They are patrilineal, practice excision and circumcision. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the disappearance of the civilization Ifé and ...


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Couple of statuettes Ere ibedji Yoruba
African art > African Statues > Statues Ibedji

Featuring numerous protective adornments and accessories, these doll statuettes are (statues), the incarnation of twins, feature a conical hairstyle made of braids, tinged with indigo. The strings of currants symbolize values of wealth and fertility.
SPatine lustrous mahogany.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash it and feed it regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man also sometimes had ibeji for his wife in the hope of pregnancy. Supporting the twin's soul, ibeji influences the life of the family, becoming a source of benefit to his parents, ...

Gelede Yoruba Mask-Heaume
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African art > African mask > Yoruba Mask

The Gelede in African art.
In Nigeria, also in Benin, this African mask in the form of a janiform hem is accompanied by its costume in cotton cloth and colorful velvet. It is used for the rejoicing dances of the Gelede society, and on the occasion of the funeral of its followers. Two smaller faces fit sideways on the mask, associated with one of the many gods of the Yoruba pantheon.These masks occur in pairs, each with a specific name. Under the mask, two openings lined with cauris have been arranged in the fabric for the dancer's vision. The Gelede country in Nigeria pays tribute to mothers through a cult of fertility, especially the oldest of them, whose powers would be comparable to those of the Yoruba gods, or orisa, and ancestors, osi and which can be used for profit but also ...


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Couple of statuettes Ibedji Yoruba
African art > African Statues > Yoruba Twins

Here, the "abiku", which is protectively dented, is available in coloured necklaces and a chain made up of cauris that unites the doll statuettes "ere" (statues), evoking twins. Their hairstyle is made up of braids gathered in a conical bun. Hands are placed on the hips. Smooth, sainy surface, residual dark inlays.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man sometimes had ibeji for his wife to sculpt in order to arouse pregnancy. Supporting the soul of the twin, the ibeji influences the life of the ...


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350.00

Gelede Yoruba Mask
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African art > African mask > Gelede Yoruba Mask

The crests in traditional African art. African Masks Gélédé are dedicated to elderly women or mothers who can no longer conceive", and are reputed to have both beneficent virtues, promoting fertility, and other harmful, such as witchcraft. During rigorously organized ceremonies, each dancer embodies the deity or the personage designated by the mask he wears. This "appropriation" is not without danger, so prayers are pronounced and medicines are prepared for masked dancers. Although Gèlèdè and Égun are both Yoruba or Nago masks, they should never meet on the same stage, the same dance floor. There is no hostility or antagonism between them, but it is not good that they cross each other. On a common cultural background, they belong to two different realities. In a gelled ceremony in which ...


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