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African art - Yoruba:

The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name of Nago. They are patrilineal, practice excision and circumcision.


Yoruba Polychrome Maternity
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African art > African Maternity > Yoruba Polychrome Maternity

This female tribal altar art sculpture features a well-preserved polychromy. She is depicted sitting in a seat on a circular base. Facilitating communication with the sacred, it reminds the deity of its duties to men. Through the child she holds on her lap, she symbolizes the protection of her people and fertility. Wearing a high crest, she also wears the three deep keloids of the Yoruba nobles on each of the cheeks. The globular eyes, fleshy lips, are also distinctive markers of Yoruba tribal statuary. Her attire, necklace and bracelets, reflect her social rank.
Sensitable, a matte, grainy patina covers the wood, which is desiccized due to cracking.
The Yoruba engaged in the slave trade with the Europeans and in particular the Portuguese before being completely subsermissed ...

Yoruba rider statuette
African art > African Rider > Cavalier Yoruba

This figure of a rider glorifies a deified ancestor. The equine, rare in the region, was also an attribute of prestige that was reserved for the nobility and sovereigns. Focused on the veneration of his gods, or orisà, the religion yoruba relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). They are designed by sculptors at the request of followers, soothsayers and their clients. These spirits are supposed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare.Patine satiny black brown, orange reflections.
Soruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name Nago. They are patrilineal, practice excision and circumcision. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the disappearance of the civilization Ifé and ...


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240.00

Couple of statuettes Ere ibedji Yoruba
African art > African Statues > Statues Ibedji

Featuring numerous protective adornments and accessories, these doll statuettes are (statues), the incarnation of twins, feature a conical hairstyle made of braids, tinged with indigo. The strings of currants symbolize values of wealth and fertility.
SPatine lustrous mahogany.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash it and feed it regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man also sometimes had ibeji for his wife in the hope of pregnancy. Supporting the twin's soul, ibeji influences the life of the family, becoming a source of benefit to his parents, ...

Gelede Yoruba Mask-Heaume
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African art > African mask > Yoruba Mask

The Gelede in African art.
In Nigeria, also in Benin, this African mask in the form of a janiform hem is accompanied by its costume in cotton cloth and colorful velvet. It is used for the rejoicing dances of the Gelede society, and on the occasion of the funeral of its followers. Two smaller faces fit sideways on the mask, associated with one of the many gods of the Yoruba pantheon.These masks occur in pairs, each with a specific name. Under the mask, two openings lined with cauris have been arranged in the fabric for the dancer's vision. The Gelede country in Nigeria pays tribute to mothers through a cult of fertility, especially the oldest of them, whose powers would be comparable to those of the Yoruba gods, or orisa, and ancestors, osi and which can be used for profit but also ...


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Couple of statuettes Ibedji Yoruba
African art > African Statues > Yoruba Twins

Here, the "abiku", which is protectively dented, is available in coloured necklaces and a chain made up of cauris that unites the doll statuettes "ere" (statues), evoking twins. Their hairstyle is made up of braids gathered in a conical bun. Hands are placed on the hips. Smooth, sainy surface, residual dark inlays.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man sometimes had ibeji for his wife to sculpt in order to arouse pregnancy. Supporting the soul of the twin, the ibeji influences the life of the ...


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350.00

Gelede Yoruba Mask
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African art > African mask > Gelede Yoruba Mask

The crests in traditional African art. African Masks Gélédé are dedicated to elderly women or mothers who can no longer conceive", and are reputed to have both beneficent virtues, promoting fertility, and other harmful, such as witchcraft. During rigorously organized ceremonies, each dancer embodies the deity or the personage designated by the mask he wears. This "appropriation" is not without danger, so prayers are pronounced and medicines are prepared for masked dancers. Although Gèlèdè and Égun are both Yoruba or Nago masks, they should never meet on the same stage, the same dance floor. There is no hostility or antagonism between them, but it is not good that they cross each other. On a common cultural background, they belong to two different realities. In a gelled ceremony in which ...


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Gelede mask
African art > African mask > Gelede mask

Gelede in African art. Gelede mask adorned with a bird, harvested in situ by the late Jacques Anquetil , a theatre man who became 'a href'https://www.youtube.com/watch?v-U11uL7JBpEQ' master weaver initiated by the Dogon, president of the French Crafts. In Nigeria, also in Benin, this African mask worn at the top of the head is used for Gelede's rejoicing dances, and for the funeral of its followers. These masks occur in pairs, each with a specific name. A single scarification adorns the cheeks here. Similar copies with no tether holes in the case of Yoruba, Rivallain and Iroko, ed. Hazan. Patine mate, beautiful preservation of the original painting. Desication cracks.
The Gelede country in Nigeria pays tribute to the mothers, especially the oldest of them, whose powers would ...


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150.00

Yoruba figure
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African art > African bronze > Yoruba figure


In African art, the horse occupies a very important mythical place among the Yoruba, although there are few representations of a man on horseback. On the contrary, it is much more widespread among Dogons.
There are several speculations about the identity of the figure depicted on the equestrian figures found in Benin. It could be a Yoruba warrior, a king of Benin or Oranmiyan, founder of the present dynasty that imported the horses to Benin. In each hand, it has an object. This is a spear and a scepter, the ultimate regal symbols.
Faithful to the aesthetic canons of the ethnic group, this statuette is worked with many details. For the sake of realism, each element is decorated and finely carved.

The Yoruba society is very organized and has several ...


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Yoruba altar figure
African art > African Statues > Statue Yoruba

The female figure depicted sitting on a throne whose feet are parallel to the legs of the character, forms an incarnation of one of the many orisa of the Yoruba, equivalent to the Christian Saints. The miniature figures that surround him would be minor followers or deities. Crusty patina, mate. Lack on one of the braids of the hairstyle.
The Yoruba society is very organized and has several associations whose roles vary. While the egbe society is strengthening social norms, the aro unites farmers. The gelede has more esoteric and religious aims. The notables come together in a society called susu. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the disappearance of the civilization Ifé and are still the basis of the political structure of the Yoruba. The Oyos created two cults ...


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450.00

Couple of twins Ibedji Yoruba
African art > African Statues > Ibedji Yoruba

Here, the "abiku", adornments with a protective purpose, can be found here in each of the characters carved into coloured pearl necklaces, cauris chains, and metal bells. These statuette-dolls "ere" (statues), evoking twins, feature a hairstyle formed of braids gathered in a sagittal crest.
Satric glossy surface.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man sometimes had ibeji for his wife to sculpt in order to arouse pregnancy. Supporting the soul of the twin, the ibeji influences the life of the ...


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300.00

Yoruba Altar
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African art > African Reliquary > Yoruba Altar

Yoruba statuary in African art

Oyo and Ijebu was born following the disappearance of the civilization Ifé and are still the basis of the political structure of the Yoruba. The Oyo created two cults centered on the ever-active Egungun and Sango societies, which worship their gods through ceremonies using masks, statuettes, sceptres and divination supports.

When the masks are not worn, they are placed on altars where they receive libations and prayers.
On a hollow base adorned with the faces of Orunmila god of divination but also perhaps of the divine messenger Esu, a group of characters is carved in round-bump. A pregnant woman sits in a chair in front of a second female figure standing. Four other miniature female figures, wearing ridges, kneel around them. ...


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Yoruba rider figure
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African art > African Rider > Cavalier Yoruba

It is in a sculpted statuette intended to appear on a Yoruba altar that a divinized ancestor, or one of the many gods, orisa, comparable to the Christian saints, who animate the pantheon of Yoruba, the divine messenger Esù or Elegba. The equine, rare in the region, was an attribute of prestige that was reserved for the nobility and the sovereigns.
This sculpture has certain constant elements and characteristics such as a mount of different proportions than the rider. The horse perched on a plinth has a small size. The character with the typical Yoruba facies has triple claw incisions on the face of the cheeks, smokes the pipe and is equipped with a rifle. Patina mate polychrome granular. Kaolin residue.
Soruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central ...


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Statuette Ere Ibedji Yoruba
African art > African Dolls > Statuette Ibeji

Wearing braids in conical buns, this female statuette depicted perched on a circular base, features a thick metal torque, wide rings on the wrists. Crusty libation residues clustered on the surface. Indigo pigments remain on the headdress. Sculpted according to the Ifa indications transmitted to the soothsayer, the babalawo , the Ibedji statuettes played the role of substitute for the death of the child.
The statues are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of it; they anoint them with oil and feed them regularly. If it disappears it is the remaining twin who takes over.
Puted as much more than a physical representation of a loved one, linked to the cult of Shango, the ibedji statues are supposed to influence the life and ...


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290.00

Coupe Agere Ifa Yoruba
African art > African Rider > Yoruba Cup

In the Yoruba pantheon, Orunmila is the deity of the which is consulted in case of problems through the divination ifà via the soothsayer babalawo (iyanifà for a woman). Intended to stand on the altar of the god, this sculpture consists of a cup that contained the sacred palm nuts and a rider figure. The character would embody Esu or Elegba , divine messenger who unites orisa to men. Cracks on the pot.
Centrée on the veneration of her gods, or orisà, the religion yoruba relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages ( aroko). They are designed by sculptors at the request of followers, soothsayers and their clients. These spirits are supposed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the disappearance of the civilization Ifé ...


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480.00

Yoruba Olumèye polychrome cutting carrier
African art > African Statues > Yoruba Cup

The cut carriers in the traditional African art of Nigeria.
The priestess, the cheeks marked with scarifications in three vertical claws, is on one knee and presents a cup for offerings or divination, supported by four Caryatidic figures. The lid is engraved with decorative motifs. The Yoruba religion is based on artistic sculptures with coded messages ( aroko). These spirits are supposed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare.
Patine polychrome mate. Many erosions.
The Yoruba society is very organized and has several associations whose roles vary. While the egbe society is strengthening social norms, the aro unites farmers. The gelede has more esoteric and religious aims. The notables come together in a society called susu . Offering cups, some of which were used ...

Yoruba Nigeria Polychrome Hema Mask
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African art > African mask > Yoruba Mask

In Nigeria, also in Benin, and especially among the Western Yoruba, the heaum masks are accompanied by their colorful cloth costumes for the rejoicing dances of the Gelede society, and on the occasion of the funeral of its followers. Often topped with a stage in the form of a round-bump sculpture, these are birds that form the central theme evoked here. This voluminous copy of Yoruba hem mask is coating with a crusty polychrome patina.
The Gelede country in Nigeria pays tribute to mothers through a cult of fertility, especially the oldest of them, whose powers would be comparable to those of the Yoruba gods, or orisa , and ancestors, osi and who can be used for the benefit of the company. Powerful women named aje are then asked to put their power at the service of the community. ...

Yoruba Cutting Carrier
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African art > African Statues > Yorouba statue

Cutting carriers in nigeria's traditional African art. The statue of priestess of Orunmila, an evocation of motherhood and fertility, sits and supports a cut adorned with faces and topped with a volatile. Faces such as masks usually represent the god of divination, while the bird would also symbolize the occult universe.
Dark saatin patina. Light polychrome residue on the lid. The Yoruba society is very organized and has several associations whose roles vary. While men's society egbe reinforces social norms, the aro unites farmers. The gelede has more esoteric and religious aims. The notables come together in a society called usu . Offering cups, some of which were used to preserve kola nuts or other gifts for visitors, were once placed in the royal palaces of the Ekiti and Igbomina ...


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Statuette Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African Statues > Statue Ibedji

Ex-collection Belgian African art.
With a arrangement of braids arranged in crest, this female statuette was sculpted in a summary, almost abrupt way for the abdomen. The shimmering necklace that adorns his neck is made up of dazzling glass beads. Its particularly lustrous surface has acquired a velvety softness. Orange residues of vegetable powder remain on the base, and indigo has been spread over the face and headdress. Desication cracks appear on the object. Coming from the vast collection of African tribal art of Mr. Guy Mercier, now deceased, consultant for the Solvay group, which undertook it at the beginning of the 20th century. While radiating in West and Central Africa as part of his work, and collecting in-situ works, the majority of his collection nevertheless comes from ...


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Statuette Ere Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African Statues > Statuette Ibedji

Wearing braids in conical buns, this statuette depicted naked on a circular base, features a thick metal torque and crusty libation residue crystallized on the surface.
Sculpted according to ifa indications transmitted to the soothsayer, the babalawo , the Ibedji statuettes played the role of substitute for the death of the child.
The statues are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of it; they anoint them with oil and feed them regularly. If it disappears it is the remaining twin who takes over.
Puted as much more than a physical representation of a loved one, linked to the cult of Shango, the ibedji statues are supposed to influence the life and prosperity of the family, and the family continues to pray to them on ...

Sceptre cavalier Yoruba
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African art > Usual african items > Statue Yoruba

A rider figure, sculpted in a round-bump, overcomes the stick of this ritual scepter. It glorifies a deified ancestor. Equid, rare in the region, was also an attribute of prestige reserved for the nobility and rulers. The mount has different proportions than the rider. The horse perched on a pedestal has a small size. Focused on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, the religion yoruba relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). They are designed by sculptors at the request of followers, soothsayers and their customers. These spirits are supposed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare. Crusty skate. Use of burgundy red pigments. The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and south-eastern region of Benin under the name Nago. They are ...


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Couple of statuettes Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African Statues > Statuettes Ibedji

Here, the protective adornments of the " are available in multiple rows of coloured necklaces and leather amulet bags for these statuette-dolls "ere" (statues), embodying twins. Based on spherical bases, the characters are depicted wearing a sagittal crest made of braided hair gathered in a shell. Hands are placed on the hips. Smooth, sainy surface, residual red bark powder inlays.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man sometimes had ibeji for his wife to sculpt in order to arouse pregnancy. ...





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