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African art - Yoruba:

The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name of Nago. They are patrilineal, practice excision and circumcision.


Couple of twins Ibedji Yoruba
African art > African Statues > Ibedji Yoruba

Here, the "abiku", adornments with a protective purpose, can be found here in each of the characters carved into coloured pearl necklaces, cauris chains, and metal bells. These statuette-dolls "ere" (statues), evoking twins, feature a hairstyle formed of braids gathered in a sagittal crest.
Satric glossy surface.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man sometimes had ibeji for his wife to sculpt in order to arouse pregnancy. Supporting the soul of the twin, the ibeji influences the life of the ...


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300.00

Gelede Yoruba Crest Mask
African art > African mask > Yorouba Mask

The Gelede country in Nigeria pays tribute to mothers, especially the oldest of them, whose powers would be comparable to those of the Yoruba gods, or orisa, and ancestors, osi and which can be used for the benefit but also for the misfortune of society. In the latter case these women are named aje . Masked ceremonies, through performances using masks, costumes and dances, are supposed to urge mothers to use their extraordinary qualities for a peaceful and constructive purpose, for the good of society. A summary sculpture of a human bust, wrapped in a snake, rises in the crest of this polychrome mask. The latter displays the specifics of the Yoruba style: large globular eyes and claw scarifications. Abraded epolychrome skate.
During rigorously organized ceremonies, each dancer ...


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150.00

Couple of twins Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African Statues > Ibedji Yoruba

African art and gemini
This couple from Ibedji, sculpted by the "babalawo", sports braided headdresses raised in shells. Naked and perched on circular pedestals, the statuettes feature quolifichets composed of different beads. A chain of cauris connects the effigies, symbolizing the richness and fécondité.br Patine chocolate .

In the language of the Yoruba people, ibedji means twin: ibi for and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin.
This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If it disappears, the remaining twin takes over.
Considered as much more than a physical representation of a loved one, the ibedji influences the life of the ...

Polychrome Yoruba Table / Tabouret
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African art > African Chair > Yoruba Seat

Equestrian sculptures, symbols of authority in African art
Focused on the veneration of its gods, or oristo, the Yoruba religion relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko) including many statues. They are designed by sculptors at the request of followers, soothsayers and their customers. These spirits are supposed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare.
This sitting, or table, is supported by cariatisoid figures, a horseman's sculpture in the center, surrounded by subjects: Metaphor of the speed of communication between the soothsayer and the god of divination, or a purely symbolic and decorative figure, the sculpted motifs were generally read only by the followers, depending on the context of ritual use.
Indigenous restorations using copper staples ...

Coupe de divination Agere Ifa en bronze
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African art > African Statues > Bronze Yoruba

Ex-English African art collection.
Within the Yoruba pantheon, Orunmila is the deity "orisa" that is consulted in case of problems through divination ifà . Intended to sit on the altar of the god, this bronze sculpture consists of a cup containing sacred palm nuts and a seated anthropomorphic figure pulling two strings, another element also used by the soothsayer babalawo (iyanifà for a woman), in divination processes, when they are not " chains opele ". The character could reflect the incarnation of Esu or Elegba, a divine messenger who unites the orisa with men. Focused on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, the religion yoruba relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages ( aroko). They are designed by sculptors at the request of followers, soothsayers and their customers. ...

Statuette Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African Statues > Statuette Yoruba

Ibeji statuettes, the incarnation of the missing child in African art Yoruba.De large globular almond eyes, deep scarifications on the face, braids gushing from the top crest generally illustrate the aesthetic traditions of African Yoruba art. Solidly camped on a flat stand, this feminine effigy, depicted nude, sports beaded belts. Brilliant chocolate patina, residual red ochre inlays, traces of indigo on the headdress.
In the language of the people Yoruba , ibeji means twin: ibi for and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. These African statuettes named ibeji are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who has to take care of them; it can wash and feed them regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. Considered much ...


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Couple of statuettes Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African Statues > Statues Ibedji

Ibeji Statuettes, incarnation of the missing child in African art Yoruba, large, globular almond eyes, deep scarifications on faces, braids arranged into conical buns and identical faces that illustrate the aesthetic traditions in African Yoruba art. Solidly camped on circular supports these naked twins are draped with numerous necklaces of multicolored glass beads, these elements associated with the sacred constitute the "abiku", adornments with the apotropaic function of these effigies " ereU 0022 (statues) of twins. . Chocolate patina, satin, traces of indigo on the headdresses and use of red ochre.
In the language of the people Yoruba , ibeji means twin: ibi for and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. These African statuettes named ibeji are then ...

Couple of twins Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African Statues > Couple Ibedji

Gemini in African art Yoruba.
The statuettes are distinguished here by their braided crest hairstyles, their pearl necklaces, and their clothing. Symbol of wealth and fertility, the rosaries of cauris knotted on their wrists. Lilibation residues mattify the smooth surface. Sculpted according to ifa indications transmitted to the soothsayer, the babalawo , the Ibedji statuettes played the role of substitute for the death of the child.
The statues are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of it; it anoints them with oil and feeds them regularly, also offering them sacrifices. If it disappears it is the remaining twin who takes over.
Considered as much more than a physical representation of a loved one, the ibedji statues, ...

Statuette Ere Ibedji Yoruba
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African art > African Dolls > Statuette Yoruba

Sculpted according to the indications of the Ifa transmitted to the soothsayer, the babalawo, the Ibedji statuettes played the role of substitute for the death of the child. The statuettes are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of it; it anoints them with oil and feeds them regularly. If it disappears it is the remaining twin who takes over. Considered much more than a physical representation of a loved one. The ibedji statues influence the life of the family, which is why the family continues to pray to them and to worship them and to give them cults and libations. This feminine statuette is draped in a woven cotton garment on which are regularly embroidered cauris symbolizing wealth and fertility. These ibedji statues are among the ...

Yoruba Zoomorphic Offering Cup
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African art > African Jar > Yoruba Cup

Votive offering cups for the god of divination Orunmila usually contained kola nuts or other special presents. It comes in the form of a gallinace, a sacrificial victim of use for the gods, also symbolizing the occult universe, divination. The Yoruba also visualize the world in the form of a gourd whose upper, masculine part would form the sky, and the lower part, feminine, the earth. The matte polychromy that emphasizes its geometric patterns is divided between browns, burgundy and beige kaolin. The Yoruba society is very organized and has several associations whose roles vary. While men's society egbe reinforces social norms, the aro unites farmers. The gelede has more esoteric and religious aims. The notables come together in a society called esusu. Offering cups, some of which were ...

Yoruba Altar Figure
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African art > African Statues > Statue Yoruba

Focused on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, the Yoruba religion relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). This altar allowing communication with the afterlife depicts as a maternal figure one of the many female goddesses, the goddess of the earth Onié ("owner of the House"), guarantor of longevity, peace, and resources , and linked to the powerful Ogboni company in Yoruba Egba and Ijebu. It could also symbolize Orunmila , goddess of divination. With one hand she holds a scepter, a mirror linked to the Ifa divination, leaning on a miniature subject, in the other she supports a figure of cutting carrier linked to the Ifa divination, symbolically installed at the top of her head. The Yoruba visualize the world as a sphere in two parts, the superior associated with the ...


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Yoruba dignitary seat
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African art > African Chair > Throne Yoruba

Prestige of furniture, seats and stools in African art
This sitting featuring cariatid figures and bird sculptures associated with divination ifa has a recurring iconography in the statuary of the Yoruba people. Indeed, centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà , the Yoruba religion relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko), often read by the only initiates of secret societies. Six caryatids support the seat of their raised arms, four support the armrests, while human figures are depicted leaning on the rear studs of the seat. A polychromy distinguishes this piece of tribal art, the red pigments symbolizing blood and fire, here associated with green. Glossy dark brown patina, kaolin pigments, indigenous restorations (metal staples on the tray and arms)


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Statuette Ibeji  Yoruba
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African art > African Statues > Yoruba doll

Ibeji statuettes, incarnation of the missing child in African art Yoruba.
Large globular almond eyes, deep scarifications on the face, braids gushing out into conical buns generally illustrate the aesthetic traditions of African Yoruba art. Solidly camped on a flat stand, this feminine effigy, depicted nude, features pearl necklaces and brass buckles encrusted in the wood. Brilliant chocolate skate, traces of indigo on the headdress.
In the language of the people Yoruba , ibeji means twin: ibi for and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. These African statuettes named ibeji are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who has to take care of them; it can wash and feed them regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. ...


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Yoruba Altar Figure
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African art > African Statues > Yoruba Maternity

This figure of motherhood, symbolizing a mother of twins and the embodiment of an orisa, mother of the living, personifies the goddess of the Earth, guarantor of the abundance of resources, fertility and prosperous health. A ritual statue to be placed on an altar, it was revered by members of the powerful Ogboni Society, or Osugbo, in charge of justice. Different twin figures, in an amazing variety of postures, surround the main breastfeeding subject. The latter features a back covered with geometric patterns referring to traditional scarifications and tattoos, and a braided hairstyle in which complementary miniatures are placed.
Granuous polychrome patina.
Yoruba live in Nigeria, Benin and Togo. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born in the 15th century following the demise ...


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Tête Ifé Oni
African art > African bronze > Bronze head

In African art, the artistic current of which these sculptures belong is named after the ancient religious capital of Nigeria, Ifè, one of the many city-states established by the Yoruba.This civilization succeeded the Nok civilization. This city-state of Ilé-Ifé, whose growth culminated from the 12th to the 15th century, had an artistic tradition of realistic royal portraits, bronze and terracotta funerary effigies. The parallel folds drawn on the neck would evoke the folds of flesh of the prosperous notables, and the hollowed-out parts that accompany it were to be used to secure the king's beaded veil. The parallel lines of the face are traditional scarifications. The holes around the mouth likely symbolized a beard created by the insertion of hair or beads.
The bronze heads were ...


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650.00

Gelede crest mask
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African art > African mask > Gelede Mask

The Gelede in African art.
In Nigeria, also in Benin, this African mask in the form of a janiform hem is accompanied by its costume in cotton cloth and colorful velvet. It is used for the rejoicing dances of the Gelede society, and on the occasion of the funeral of its followers. These masks occur in pairs, each with a specific name. A scene composed of musicians and acrobats rests on a round-bump, circular pattern, depicting a snake, and reptiles are carved on the walls of the hem. Desication cracks, strong erosion of the base of the part. Skate mate.
Gelede Country in Nigeria pays tribute to mothers, especially the oldest of them, whose powers would be comparable to those of the Yoruba gods, or orisa , and ancestors, osi and who can be used for profit but also for the ...


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Couple of statuettes Ibedji Yoruba
African art > African Statues > Yoruba Twins

Here, the "abiku", which is protectively dented, is available in coloured necklaces and a chain made up of cauris that unites the doll statuettes "ere" (statues), evoking twins. Their hairstyle is made up of braids gathered in a conical bun. Hands are placed on the hips. Smooth, sainy surface, residual dark inlays.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man sometimes had ibeji for his wife to sculpt in order to arouse pregnancy. Supporting the soul of the twin, the ibeji influences the life of the ...


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350.00

Babalawo Yoruba Fetish
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African art > African Rider > Babalawo Yoruba Fetish

The use of colored beads in African art.

This beaded statue represents a Babalawo (or Babalao, or Babaaláwo, pronounced Baba-a-láwo), priest of Ifa, in the Yoruba language. Ifa is a divination system that represents the teachings of Orisha Orunmila, orisha of Wisdom. The babalawo claim to make sure of the future through their communication with Orunmila. Orishas are the divine spirits that control natural forces. They are mainly found in the Yoruba cosmogony but more widely in West Africa is in the diasporas of Central and South America. The character is represented here on his mount and classically covered with fine polychrome pearls.


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Figure of Portuguese warrior Benin
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African art > African bronze > Bronze Benin

This statue of a Portuguese soldier, made according to the process of cast iron with lost wax, has a fire. Richly dressed, he wears a traditional tunic, a hip dagger, a helmet, and ankle bracelets.
The Portuguese arrived in 15th century Benin, endowed with a military arsenal that aroused great interest among kings. The power of firearms was then naturally associated with the occult defense against invisible enemies. In the 16th century, Europeans played a major role at the Oba court: they imported corals and glass beads, shackles also highly coveted by the king and his courtiers.
At the same time, their soldiers participated in Benin's military campaigns, notably against the kingdom of Idah. The character's firewall thus attests to the presence of cannons, an unavoidable and ...

Olumèye Yoruba Cutting Carrier
African art > African Statues > Statue Yoruba

Cutting carriers in nigeria's traditional African art.
The priestess wearing a high crest, the cheeks marked with scarifications in three vertical claws "kpélé", is on her knees, her body leaning forward, her breasts stretched over a cup whose lid is adorned with a bird symbolizing the occult universe, divination. The Yoruba visualize the world in the form of a gourd whose upper, masculine part would form the sky, and the lower part, feminine, the earth.
Patine honey , indigo.br-Inlays The Yoruba society is very organized and has several associations whose roles vary. While men's society egbe reinforces social norms, the aro unites farmers. The gelede has more esoteric and religious aims. The notables come together in a society called usu . Offering cups, some of which were ...


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480.00

Statuette Ere Ibeji Yoruba
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African art > African Statues > Statuette Ibeji

The Ibeji , surrogate images in African art
Wide globular eyes, crescent tops, claw scarifications on the face, illustrate the constants of the aesthetic traditions of African Yoruba art. In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over.
There were also times when a man had ibeji for his wife to sculpt pregnancy, the object of fertility support. Supporting the soul of the twin, the ibeji influences the life of the family, becoming a source of blessings towards his parents, the latter continuing to pray to him ...


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