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African art items:


We offer you a large selection of unique pieces of African art. Coming from private collections or purchased directly “in situ”, these works are the subject of a special study to determine their provenance as well as their conditions of acquisition. We make it a point of honor to offer our customers quality works of African art, old or contemporary, acquired within the framework of an ethical market. It is the history of these pieces that we invite you to discover through our gallery and websites.

Songye Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Songye Mask

African art Songye
The African initiation masks of the Songye.
In the south of the Democratic Republic of Congo, this type of feminine mask "kalyanga" which offers a finely ridged surface accentuating its volumes, is still worn today with a long costume and a long fiber beard natural, during masked rituals. Matt patina, erosions and desiccation cracks.
Three variants of this type ofKifwebe mask( pl. Bifwebe) or "chasing out death" (Roberts) are distinguished: the masculine (kilume) generally with a high crest, the feminine (kikashi) with a very low or even absent crest, and finally the largest embodying power (kia ndoshi). The Songye came from the Shaba region of the DRC and settled along the Lualaba River. They are governed by the yakitengé and by local chiefs. ...


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150.00

Yaka Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Yaka Mask

This northern Yaka mask, which has a handle, is capped with a basket cap, which is draped in a textile where colorful decorative motifs partially flake. The face is cemented with a red ochre border including the ears and nostrils. The parallel lines drawn on the cheeks are the tears of the initiates. The Zombo also used similar masks sculpted by the Yaka. Insiders could wear these single-platform masks that appeared in pairs. Height on a base: 59 cm.
Locally abraded polychrome
As initiation songs accompanied the appearance of the African Yaka mask, which incorporates the category of high-ranking masks thanks to its tiered headdress. Their design aroused the creativity of the sculptors whom the chefs rewarded for their talent. Hierarchical and authoritarian, composed of ...


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280.00

Gelede Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Gelede Mask

Collection d' Afrikaanse kunst van de kunstenaar A. Plaza Garcès. Gelede mask depicting a hatted face framed by flat elements. Multicolored highlights enliven the sculpture. In Nigeria, also in Benin, this African mask worn on the top of the head is used for the joyful dances of the Gelede society, and on the occasion of the funerals of its followers. These masks occur in pairs, each given a specific name. Grainy patina of use, locally abraded. Desiccation cracks and lack.
The Gelede country in Nigeria pays homage to mothers, especially the oldest among them, whose powers are said to be comparable to those of the Yoruba gods, or orisa, and the ancestors, osi< /i> and which can be used for the benefit but also for the misfortune of society. In the latter case these women are ...


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290.00

Moba Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Moba Statue

French collection of tribal art These Tchicheri, or cicilg, present themselves to us either in reduced forms intended for the family altar, or in the form of personal talisman, the yendu tchicheri. Only the sons of diviners were authorized to sculpt this protective effigy. In West Africa, the tchitcheri sakab (pl. of Tchicherik) embody a founding ancestor of the clan. This crude-looking sculpted figure, devoid of features and now eroded and furrowed, was initially planted in the earth.
The mediating object is supposed to increase the magical power of the family or community altar. Light patina, dark drips.

Lit. : "The soul of Africa", S. Diakonoff.; “Africa” Ed. Prestel; “The Ewa and Yves Develon African Collection” Musée des Confluences.


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380.00

Yoruba Headdress
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Yoruba Headdress

Collection of tribal art by the painter Amadeo Plaza Garcés.
Named Adenla or Adé, this ancient crown of a Yoruba sovereign or oba was worn during festive ceremonies, rites or funerals. The chief held a variety of headdresses of this type intended for various occasions. The cotton, stretched over a metal frame, is embroidered with thousands of multicolored glass beads. The birds adorning this copy symbolize the spiritual powers (ase) granted to the king and with which he can bestow his subjects.


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250.00

Fanti doll
African art > African Dolls > Fanti doll

Collection of African art by the painter A. Plaza Garcès African art Fanti, Fante, is best known for its fertility dolls which are carried by pregnant women, who must not lay their eyes on a malformed being or object, for fear that their children will resemble them. On the other hand, looking at these dolls, expressions of idealized beauty, they are supposed to promote the beauty of their future children. These dolls sculpted by the Fante, an Akan population from the coastal regions of Ghana, the former Gold Coast, have a slightly different appearance from those of the Ashanti. However, their function is more or less similar. The head here adopts a rectangular shape. We find the ringed neck surmounting a tubular body devoid of limbs. Glossy brown patina, desication crack.


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150.00

Baga statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Baga statuette

French collection of French African art.
Rare fetish statuette associated with the large snake mask of the Baga groups. Abraded patina of use. Slight drying cracks.
The initiatory African mask, serpentiform, used mainly by the Bulongic (village of Kifinda), Baga subgroup of the Guinean coast, can measure up to 2.50 m. These masks were divided into two groups with the names Mosolo kombo and Sangaran, each with specific functions. Their design took shape in an esoteric context, at night in the heart of the forest. Privileges of initiated men, embodying a spiritual entity, Baga Sangaran masks were only present at circumcision, every 24 years according to ethnologist Denise Paulme. During certain dances the mask was placed on the head, held in balance by a bamboo structure and by ...


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120.00

Gelede mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Gelede mask

Collection of African art by the painter A. Plaza Garcès. Gelede crest mask depicting a face with faint features surmounted by a kneeling subject. The mask is painted with colored pigments. In Nigeria, also in Benin, this African mask worn on the top of the head is used for the joyful dances of the Gelede society, and on the occasion of the funerals of its followers. These masks occur in pairs, each given a specific name. Brilliant patina of use, erosions and breakage.
The Gelede country in Nigeria pays homage to mothers, especially the oldest among them, whose powers are said to be comparable to those of the Yoruba gods, or orisa, and the ancestors, osi< /i> and which can be used for the benefit but also for the misfortune of society. In the latter case these women are ...


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290.00

Guro mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Guro mask

Mask represented topped with an amulet like those that women inserted in their hair. It was used with Zamble and Zaouli, but is no longer used today. ("Guro", ed. 5Continents, pl.13) Numerous erosions.
Among the Mande group in the south, in central Côte d'Ivoire, on the banks of the Bandama, the Gouro are organized into lineages, and are the western neighbors of the Baoulé who have borrowed several features of their African tribal art creations. Animists, they have used since the 1950s a family of masks associated with the Zaouli dance. Indeed like the African Goli masks of the Baule, the set of Guro masks, relating to the genies of nature, comes in two zoomorphic masks followed by a third anthropomorphic one, which is considered the wife of the zamblé mask, the Gu. Priest ...


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280.00

Tschokwe Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Tschokwe Mask

Among the many African masks akishi (sing: mukishi, indicating power) of African tribal art Chokwe, the powerful male counterpart of the Mwana Pwo mask is the cihongo . These masks are danced by itinerant professionals. The characteristic motifs on the forehead, and sometimes on the cheekbones, are part of the chokwe aesthetic canons but also served as public markers of ethnic identity. This recurrent cruciform frontal pattern would also have a cosmogonic significance. Always worn by dancers of royal blood, this mask embodying a spirit symbolizes power and wealth. He also intervened, at times, on occasion judgments. Semi-saturated brown patina, small shards. Height on a base: 30 cm.
The masks of the Chokwe, Luda, Luvale/Lwena, Luchazi and Mbunda clans are named in Zambia as ...


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120.00

Lega Figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lega Figure

Tribal statuette Sakimatwematwe (Multi-headed) belonging to an initiate of the Bwami, among the many others used throughout the initiations, linked to a Lega proverb. Equipped with two or more heads, this statuette would always illustrate the need for a global vision of events, and therefore the prudence, wisdom and impartiality that should result from it. (Biebuyck 1973).
Abraded velvety patina, grainy residues of kaolin. Losses and desication cracks.
During the initiation rites of the Bwami, among the Lega, the teacher guided the aspirant to a place where masks and statuettes were displayed, and it was through careful observation that the future initiate had to guess the more or less complex meaning. of these metaphors, the latter largely referring to proverbs and sayings. ...


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120.00

Sao Bronze
African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Sao Bronze

Miniature in bronze alloy depicting a rider on his mount, the latter representing an exceptional attribute of prestige in the arid regions of the Sahel. This talisman constitutes, for the Sao, a protection against madness. The rider symbolizes the genius who possesses the madman, the horse representing the victim.
Between the 12th and 14th centuries, the Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established on hills in the border regions of Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria, in order to repel invaders. Subjected to successive attacks from their neighbors in Kanem and then to hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the North-West of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to the Kotokos. The Kotoko still attribute today to the copper ...


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40.00

Sao Bronze
African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Sao Bronze

Used as an amulet credited with apotropaic virtues, this bronze sculpture constitutes, for the Sao, a talisman supposed to protect them from madness. It is therefore worn permanently. The genius who possesses the madman is represented by the rider, the horse, a rare attribute of prestige in these regions of the Sahel, representing the victim.
The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the 12th and 14th centuries in a geographical area extending over the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. Subjected to successive attacks from their neighbors in Kanem and then to hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the North-West of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. . ...


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40.00

Statue Senoufo
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Senoufo

Belgian collection of African art The sculpted figures of the Senufo are associated with the male members of the Poro or the female followers of the Tyekpa. The Poro uses these statues in pairs, outside in a wooden hut where funerals take place. Some are fetishes of the yasungo altars on which sacrifices are made. Shaded brown patina. Erosions and cracks from desiccation.
The Senufos, the name given to them by the French colonists, are mainly composed of farmers who have dispersed between Mali, Ivory Coast, and Burkina Faso. The Poro association initiates young boys from the age of seven in a succession of three cycles lasting seven years. When one of the members of the Poro dies, the statues called pombibele were exhibited. The deble statues, used by diviners, represent bush ...


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180.00

Terracotta Head
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Terracotta Head

French collection of African tribal art.
Terracotta head inspired by Ifé commemorative portraits. Grainy black patina. Abrasions and cracks. In African art, the artistic movement to which this type of African works belongs is named after the ancient religious capital of Nigeria, Ifè, one of the many city-states established by the Yoruba. This civilization succeeded the Nok civilization. This city-state of Ilé-Ifé, whose growth peaked from the 12th to the 15th century, had an artistic tradition of royal portraits imbued with realism, funerary effigies in bronze but also in terracotta. The parallel folds drawn on the neck would evoke the folds of flesh of prosperous notables, and the hollowed out parts would have been used to secure the king's beaded veil.


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240.00

Pende Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Pende Mask

Collection of BelgianAfrican art, the name will be communicated to the buyer.
This African initiation mask, Mbuya, comes from the Pende of the West, where the Yaka influence is notable through the slightly upturned nose, and the line of the eyebrows recalls the features of the neighboring Chokwe. This mask symbolizes the masculine and feminine qualities of the leader. The Western Pende are established on the banks of the Kwilu, while the Eastern Pende reside on the banks of the Kasai downstream of Tshikapa. Their tribal sculpture is marked by the influence of neighboring ethnic groups such as Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu.
Within this cultural diversity, the Mbuya masks, realistic and produced every ten years, have a festive function. They embody different ...


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280.00

Pende Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Pende Mask

African Pende Mbangu “disease” masks, also called Bwala-Bwala, exaggerate the symptoms of disorders such as epilepsy or facial paralysis, often attributed to witchcraft practices. These comical masks are worn by dancers who wear hats decorated with guinea fowl, coucal or turaco feathers, sometimes even lumbandu, a crown of leaves. Often decorated with a hump on the back, these masks accentuate the disabled appearance of the character. Originating from the upper Kwango region, Pende masks are distinguished by their angled noses, their distorted mouths, as well as their areas of contrasting colors, with a distinctive semi-matte patina.
The Western Pende live along the banks of the Kwilu, while the Easterners settled on the banks of the Kasai downstream of Tshikapa. Their rich ...


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280.00

Bembe Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bembe Bronze

Belgian African art collection.
African statuette embodying an ancestor. The subject, with a protective aim, bears the keloid patterns testifying to the successive stages of the initiation to which he was subjected. Khaki patina rubbed with pink ocher for a ritual purpose.
Established on the plateaus of the People's Republic of Congo ex.Brazzaville, and not to be confused with the Bembe group of northern Lake Tanganinyika, the small Bwende group was influenced by Téké rites and culture, but especially by that of the Kongo. The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembe, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by king ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same ...


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250.00

Lega Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lega Statue

Ex. Belgian collection.
African artlega and initiation materials.
African tribal sculpture Sakimatwematwe (Multi-heads) belonging to an initiate of Bwami, among the many others used throughout the initiations. The teacher guided the aspirant to a place where masks and statuettes were exhibited, and it was through careful observation that the future initiate had to guess the more or less complex meaning of these metaphors, the latter referring largely to proverbs. and sayings. Matte light patina, abrasions and drying cracks. A tuft of feathers was generally inserted at the top.
Relating to a Lega proverb, with two or more heads, this statuette would always illustrate the need for a global vision of events, and therefore the prudence, wisdom and impartiality that ...


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180.00

Mende Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Mende Statue

Mende Statue probably relating to bundu ritual initiations. Localized abrasions, minor drying cracks, black oiled patina.
The Mende, Vaï and Gola cultures of Sierra Leone, Liberia and the west coast of Guinea are known for their helmet masks, including those of the Sandé female initiation society which prepares young people girls at the wedding. Mende masks are made by men and worn by women. The Bassa group of Liberia is established in the coastal region, more particularly around Grand-Bassa.


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180.00

Kuba cup
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kuba cup

Among the prestigious objects, this palm wine cup with its stylized handles. The sculpted face recalls the features of the great royal Kuba masks. Glossy surface inlaid with kaolin residues. Cracks of desiccation.
The Kuba are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for the high ranks of their society. Indeed, several Kuba groups produced anthropomorphic objects with refined designs, including cups, drinking horns and goblets. The Lele settled in the western part of the Kuba kingdom, at the confluence of the Kasai and Bashilele rivers. Intercultural exchanges between the Bushoong of the Kuba territory and the Lele made the attribution of certain objects delicate, as both groups use the same iconography, composed of faces with elaborate hairstyles and ...


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95.00





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