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African art items:


We offer you a large selection of unique pieces of African art. Coming from private collections or purchased directly “in situ”, these works are the subject of a special study to determine their provenance as well as their conditions of acquisition. We make it a point of honor to offer our customers quality works of African art, old or contemporary, acquired within the framework of an ethical market. It is the history of these pieces that we invite you to discover through our gallery and websites.

Statue Metoko
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Metoko

The Metoko in African tribal art.
This small statuette with collected volumes is camped on large digitized feet, the hips surrounded by a raffia bond evoking a loincloth. A nasal ridge joining the top of the forehead, eye lozenges, a small mouth drawn in the wood.  Numerous scarifications, written in alternating parallel lines, reveal the character's status, which would play a worthy old man who has been a victim of witchcraft, kakungu. In the hollow of these furrows kaolin pigments have become embedded, giving a light beige patina to the object.
Katungu cult statue belonging to the Metoko and Lengola, peoples of the primary forest dedicated to the worship of a single God, rare monotheism in Africa. Their company, Bukota, welcoming both men and women, is the equivalent of the ...


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95.00

Kongo Statue
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Kongo Statue

French collection of African art. African sculpture depicting subjects very skilled in acrobatics. The Vili produced a variety of sculptures for individual use nkisi, to which multiple virtues were attributed, and anecdotal statues such as this example symbolizing an ancestor of the clan.
Glossy patina, matte blackened areas, restorations. The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, led by king ntotela . Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary with codified gestures in relation to their vision of the world. Present along the Gabonese coast, the Vili broke away from the Kongo kingdom ...


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380.00

Tikar Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Tikar Bronze

French collection of African art.

Symbolizing the joyful exuberance of Tikar, this bronze sculpture mixing various subjects in ever more surprising postures. Black patina, erosions.
The chiefs of the Cameroonian Grasslands, the Fon, reputed to hold treasures of works of art, including bracelets, necklaces, statues, bells, valued the founders and sculptors in the service of the kingdom. These productions, without which the chef lost his prestige, aimed to magnify the role of the fon. The technique used was lost wax casting, the decorations varying according to the status of the recipient to whom the king wished to grant a reward. The Bamoun sometimes bought works from the Tikar, who were also gifted in metalworking. From 1920 the founders no longer worked exclusively for ...


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480.00

Bangwa Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bangwa Statue

In African art , commemorative sculptures of titled kings, queens, princesses and servants, as well as parents of twins, the Bangwa form the reputation of this small kingdom within the large Bamileke people in western Cameroon.
We observe the influence of the Bamileke on the Bangwa statuary without the use of pearls. The body posture is classical, lower and upper limbs flexed.
Commanded by the leaders they embody, the Bangwa statues refer to fertility but also to power and combativeness. They are positioned in pairs on either side of the induction chairs during notable meetings.
Thick brown cracked patina. Minor shards.


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490.00

Comb Kwere
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Comb Kwere

French African art collection.
Prestigious African comb with a traditional doll motif. Light brown satin smooth patina. The Zaramo and the tribes around them designed dolls generally associated with fertility, but to which other virtues would be attributed. Its primary role is played during the period of confinement of the young initiate Zaramo. The novice will behave towards the object as with a child, and will dance with it during the closing ceremonies of the initiation. In case the young woman does not conceive, she will adopt the "child". Among the Zaramo, this carved motif is repeated on the top of canes, decorates ritual objects, such as combs, hairpins, and even appears on burial posts.


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95.00

Statuettes Dan
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statuettes Dan

French collection of African art .



These anthopomorphic figures, set on large digital feet, offer a stocky anatomy. Their faces recall the masks dan by the protrusion of the wide lips. Granular residues remain, following the rites that benefited the subjects. Matt black patina.
Gifts of women, food, festive ceremonies and honorable status once rewarded the dan sculptors to whom this talent was bestowed during a dream. The latter was the means of communication of Du, the invisible spiritual power, with men. The statuary, rare, held a prestigious role with its holder. They are mainly effigies of wives, lü mä human beings made of wood. They are not spirit incarnations or effigies of ancestors, but prestige figures representing living people, often ...


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350.00

Toma mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Toma mask

French collection of African art This African mask of the bakrogui type, topped with small horns, is presented without eyes and in a modest version. The surface is coated with crusty residue, mainly on the forehead.
Only members of the Poro were allowed to contemplate the bakrogui mask associated with the ancestors.
Height on base: 39 cm.
The Toma of Guinea, called Loma in Liberia, live in the heart of the forest, at altitude. They are renowned for their landaï mask-boards intended to animate the initiation rites of the poro association which structures their society, and which represent spirits of the bush. As soon as the landaï mask appeared, the initiates went to the forest to stay there for a month during which they would be taught. At the end of this journey, ...


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290.00

Kuba neck support
African art > Head rest > Kuba neck support

The African sculptures held by members of the Kuba royal family and peripheral groups, Bushoong and Dengese, bear refined decorative motifs, parallel lines, intersecting, checkerboards. Objects of daily use are also embellished with them, such as this double headrest whose caryatic figures refer to the animal totems of the clan and to the ancestors. Glossy dark brown patina, mahogany reflections. Desication cracks (plateau).
The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the main tribe Bushoong which is still ruled by a king today. More than twenty types of tribal masks are used among the Kuba or "lightning people", with meanings and functions that vary from group to group. Ritual ceremonies were an opportunity to exhibit decorative arts and masks, in order to honor the ...


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170.00

Yaka Neck support
African art > Head rest > Yaka Neck support

Among the ritual charms of matrilineal leaders and heads of families, this type of neck support named musaw or m-baambu, makes part of African tribal art objects related to prestige. These dignitaries, who kept them in their bedrooms, sought to preserve their sophisticated headdresses.
Some of these sculptures had magical charges inserted into discreet cavities.
Satin honey patina, small accidents.
Hierarchical and authoritarian, made up of formidable warriors, Yaka society was governed by lineage leaders with the right to life and death over their subjects. Hunting and the prestige that results from it are nowadays an opportunity for the Yaka to invoke the ancestors and to resort to rituals using charms linked to the "khosi" institution. The youth initiation society is ...


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170.00

Chokwe Neck support
African art > Head rest > Chokwe Neck support

African headrest, an element of African furniture which, in addition to being used in a ritual context, preserves the voluminous traditional headdresses of its owners. This neckrest stands out thanks to its animal motif, its smooth and shiny patina, and the insertion of upholstery nails. The Chokwe and their neighbors in Angola produced various seats and headrests with zoomorphic designs for dignitaries. Desiccation cracks.

Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwé were then subject to the Lunda empire from which they inherited a new hierarchical system and the sacredness of power. However, the Chokwé never fully adopted these new social and political contributions. Three centuries later, they ended up seizing the capital of the Lunda, ...


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170.00

Songye Fetish
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Songye Fetish

Belgian collection of African art
This piece features the distinctive graphic characteristics of the Songye, characterized by angular shapes. Traditionally, the magical power of banksishi (or Nkishi) is reinforced by the addition of accessories such as talismans, metallic elements, seeds, shells, like the loincloth present here, and sometimes by small leather bags. The absence of the usual horn at the top, which often symbolizes magical charge, indicates that this piece has been desecrated. Its light golden patina, inlaid with white clay, gives it a particular aesthetic.
These protection fetishes, intended for homes, are among the most popular in Africa, playing the role of mediators between gods and men. The Songyes, in the 16th century, migrated from the Shaba region to ...


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490.00

Figure Buyu
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Figure Buyu

This janiform sculpture with hollowed-out pupils, projected into large bleached cavities, is carried by a base evoking traditional African stools. This object is associated with the worship of the water spirit Kalunga , among the many spirits of nature revered by the Buyu. The Bembe have comparable statuettes. Satiny patina, desication cracks.
Fral flows have mixed Bembe, Lega, Buyu (Buye) or Boyo, Binji and Bangubangu, within the same territories. The Bassikassingo , considered by some to be a sub-clan Buyu , are not of bembe origin although they live on their territory, as Biebuyck's work has traced their history. Organized in lineages, they borrowed the association of the Bwami Lega. The traditions bembé and boyo are relatively similar They venerate the spirits of nature, water ...


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280.00

Dan Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Dan Mask

Thick braided raffia mats here realistically frame a face with fine, protruding features. Semi-matte black patina. Abrasions.
The Dan masks, of various styles, generally occur during very theatrical entertainment festivals where women play a leading role. The so-called "mocking" mask called Déanglé defines an ideal of beauty and benevolence because it is sculpted in honor of the young girls of the village or renowned men. Each mask had a name linked to its function. Also used during circumcision rites, they appear in the company of the gle sö singing masks and the large go ge masks relating to the go society, who exercises justice and maintains social stability.


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240.00

Reliquary figure Fang Byéri
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Reliquary figure Fang Byéri

French African art collection.
Female ancestor effigy with unusual round head. The feet are missing, the posterior stalk eroded. Metal washers with a brass cabochon in the center form the character's hallucinated gaze. The sculptor opted for a geometric mouth, revealing incised teeth. The legs, apart, have massive thighs and disproportionate shins. The peoples known as Fang, or "Pahouins", described as conquering warriors, invaded in successive leaps, from villages to villages, the entire vast region between the Sanaga in Cameroon and the Ogooué in Gabon, between the 18th and the beginning of the 20th century. century. They have never had political unity. Clan cohesion was maintained through religious and judicial associations such as so and ngil . At the bottom of their boxes, in a ...


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250.00

Bamana Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bamana Mask

This African mask of ntomo, an initiatory society of uncircumcised youth widespread in the Niger River region, is, like most Bamana masks, coated with a powder of charred coal. Grainy dark patina.
Erosions and drying cracks.
Established in central and southern Mali, in an area of savannah, the Bambara, "Bamana" or "unbelievers", as the Muslims have named them, belong to the great Mande group, with the Soninke and the Malinke. Mostly farmers, but also herders, they make up the largest ethnic group in Mali. Animists, they believe in the existence of a god Ngala who coexists with another androgynous god called Faro. The groups of Nyamakala artisans, more specifically the blacksmiths named numu, are in charge of the sculpture of ritual objects, endowed with nyama , ...


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160.00

 Dogon pendant
African art > Jewelry, ornament > Dogon pendant

African sculpture of bronze alloy type Dogon, African statuette Dogon depicting a seated ancestor. Khaki patina with golden highlights.

The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, esotericism, myths and legends. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 people living south-west of the Niger Loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest of Ouahigouya). The remains of old steel sites on the Bandiagara plateau, dating from the 15th century, confirm the activity of blacksmiths. The latter form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim They now produce weapons, tools,and also work wood. "Masters of fire", they are also supposed to heal burns (Huib Blom).


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95.00

Lega mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Lega mask

Mask offering an oval face, in which the heart-shaped orbits present an asymmetric look. Residual incrustations of kaolin. Golden patina. This carving indicated the stage that its holder had reached within the Bwami, an apprenticeship society composed of different grades, and which was joined by wives whose spouses had reached the third level, that of the ngandu. Height on base: 29 cm.
Within the Lega, the Bwami society open to men and women,organized social and political life. There were up to seven levels of initiation, each associated with emblems. Following their exodus from Uganda during the seventeenth century, the Lega settled on the west bank of the Lualaba River in the DRC. In ritual ceremonies, Idumu masks were presented to initiates placed on a fence and ...


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190.00

Chokwe Staff
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Chokwe Staff

Les régalia des Tchokwe dans l'art africain
Emblême de pouvoir faisant partie des régalia, marque d'ostentation, ce sceptre représente la puissance politique et symbolique.  Sculpture en ronde-bosse réalisée par un artiste au service du chef, associée au culte thérapeutique de type Hamba, la figure féminine Chokwe ou Lwena incarne l'ancêtre féminin qui est censée garantir les naissances ou la guérison. Le personnage qui illustre également la seconde épouse du chef mythique Chibinda Ilunga arbore une coiffure bombée telle un casque.
Patine brune satinée, résidus de kaolin.
Paisiblement installés en Angola oriental jusqu'au XVIème siècle, les Chokwé ont ensuite été soumis à l'empire lunda dont ils ont hérité un nouveau système hiérarchique et la sacralité du pouvoir. ...


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160.00

Kongo figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kongo figure

Small statuette carved in the Kongo style, associated with the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure. The child would embody the matrilineal transmission of power. These effigies frequently formed the carved pattern atop chiefs' canes. Glossy dark brown patina.
Desication crack. A clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternities. The use of this type of sculpture remains unknown. Among the Kongo , the nganga was responsible for the rituals by activating a spiritual force with an nkondi (pl. nkissi). The term nkisi was then used to designate the notions of "sacred" or "divine". The most influential category of "minkisi kongo" consisted of ...


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160.00

Dogon bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon bronze

Small anecdotal statuette describing a character carrying an ax and a bundle of wood. This statuette with many details is coated with a black patina encrusted with clear deposits.
Dogon blacksmiths form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim. They now produce weapons, tools, and also work with wood. "Masters of fire" associated in the Dogon cosmogony with the primordial beings "Nommo" created by the god Ama, they are also supposed to heal burns. Small metal objects, made using the lost-wax technique, were widespread in the Inner Niger Delta region, with copper reaching it through trans-Saharan trade. Excavations on the Bandiagara plateau have in fact brought to light vestiges of iron and steel sites prior to the 15th century, the date of the arrival of the Dogon. The ...


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99.00

Baoule Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Baoule Statuette

Collection of French African tribal art.
African figure incorrectly named "settler" , which represents, for the Baoulé, an idealized, individual image of the celestial spouse. Its features were carved on the diviner's instructions for his client in an attempt to remedy various problems.

Colored matte patina, abrasions from use, cracks.
Two types of statues are produced by the Baoulé in the ritual context: TheWaka-Sona statues, "being of wood" in Baoulé, evoke an assié oussou, being of the earth. They are part of a type of statue intended to be used as a medium tool by the komien diviners, the latter being selected by the asye usu spirits in order to communicate revelations from the beyond. The second type of statues, made according to the soothsayer's ...


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290.00





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