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African art items:


We offer you a large selection of unique pieces of African art. Coming from private collections or purchased directly “in situ”, these works are the subject of a special study to determine their provenance as well as their conditions of acquisition. We make it a point of honor to offer our customers quality works of African art, old or contemporary, acquired within the framework of an ethical market. It is the history of these pieces that we invite you to discover through our gallery and websites.

Gbandi mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Gbandi mask

The Ngbaka, Ngbandi and Ngombe wear a scarification on the forehead that extends over the bridge of the nose, the particularity of the Ngombe remaining, however, the "v" shaped keloids. This type of mask appeared in pairs during the Ngbandi Gaza initiations. Dark patina, colored highlights. In northwestern Zaire, south of the Ubangi River, on the banks of the Lualaba, live the 120000 Ngombe of Bantu language, led by a chief and a warrior society Elombe . Their neighbors are the Ngbandi and Ngbaka whose statuary has influenced their tribal sculpture, and various banda groups. Their geometric-looking masks are used during the rites of the mani society. In addition, they produce hunting fetishes with protective purposes, and prestige objects decorated with tapestry nails.


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175.00

Mambila Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Mambila Statue

Belgian collection of African art.
The anthropomorphic representation is imposing, with a hunched posture, the head inclined towards the chest, the arms wrapped around a bust flaring towards strong, slightly bent legs. The face, distinctive with its heart shape, is decorated with a multitude of tenons. A crusty patina covers the surface, with a thin film of locally cracked clay, showing desiccation cracks.
Despite their limited number, around thirty thousand, the Mambila (also known as Mambilla, Mambere, Nor, Torbi, Lagubi, Tagbo, Tongbo, Bang, Ble, Juli, Bea) residing in the northwest Cameroon produced a large number of masks and statues recognizable by their heart-shaped faces. Although the Mambila believe in a creator god named Chang or Nama, they worship their ...


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320.00

Luvale mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Luvale mask

This African mask depicting the face of a young woman wearing a hemispherical headdress was worn at the top of the head during the closing ceremonies of the Mukanda initiation. It was supposed to promote hunting, fertility, and harvests.
Slight losses and drying crack.
Abrasive matte patina, crusty residue.
Of Lunda origin, the Lwena (or even Lovale , or Luvale ) emigrated from Angola to Zaire in the 19th century, pushed back by the Chokwe. Some became slave traders, others, the Lovales, found refuge in Zambia and near the Zambezi in Angola. Their society is matrilineal, exogamous and polygamous. The Lwena have become known for their honey-colored sculptures, embodying figures of deceased ancestors and chiefs, and their masks linked to the initiation ...


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140.00

Ashanti Maternity
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Ashanti Maternity

Belgian private collection of African art Jan Putteneers.

Seated female representations from Côte d'Ivoire and Ghana are usually queens. A particularity of this piece is that this woman is carrying her child in her arms.
This one is removable like the stool. The latter with a curved seat is typical of the akan.
seats. The patina is clear and slightly worn in places.
The features of the face are marked with black color giving a realistic look, breathing life into the large black pupils.

The Akan people are subdivided into several famous subgroups spread near the coast in Ivory Coast and Ghana, having become rich through the trade of precious metals and slaves during contacts with Westerners and in particular the Portuguese who were the ...


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580.00

Dogon Altar
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Dogon Altar

Private African art collection.
Harvested in the 1950s by Monsieur Arnaud, accompanying Alain Bilot,
renowned collector of Dogon art during study stays in Mali.

Four figures of ancestors or chiefs of lineage, whose feet disappear in a circular tray symbolizing the axis of the world, support a hollowed out cup. The latter is slightly off-center. The hands of the figures rest on their knees, and two of them wear masks. Scabby deposits bear witness to libatory rites. Rough, crusty surface.
Sculpted for the most part on commission by a family, Dogon statues can ...


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350.00

Songye Fetish
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Songye Fetish

Magical sculpture nkishi (pl. mankishi) whose face is comparable to kifwebe masks. The protruding abdomen is devoid of its bishimba load. For the Songye, the addition of various accessories, metal, gimmicks, etc. reinforced the "power" of the fetish. Dark oiled patina. Very minor erosion.

These protection fetishes intended for homes are among the most popular in Africa. The Nkisi plays the role of mediator between gods and men. Large examples are the collective property of an entire village, while smaller figures belong to an individual or family. In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle on the left bank of the Lualaba. Their society is organized in a patriarchal way. Their history is inseparable from that of the Luba to whom they are related ...


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480.00

Songye fetish
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Songye fetish

British Traditional African Art Collection.
Among the wide range of Songye sculptures, details distinguish this Songye statuette such as the horn inserted into the head at the tip, and the tiny metal crown at the top. The magic power of the bankishi, (sing. Nkishi) is supposed to be reinforced thanks to the addition of accessories, talismans, metallic elements, seeds, shells. The abdominal cavity is filled with a magical charge that can be made up of therapeutic ingredients. Glossy patina, desication cracks.
In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle on the left bank of the Lualaba. Their society is organized in a patriarchal way. Their history is inseparable from that of the Luba to which they are related through common ancestors.
Very ...


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290.00

Juju Hat
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Juju Hat

Collection of French African art
During the elephant dance ceremony, called tso, members of the Kuosi society, also known as Kwosi, sported these impressive headdresses. These headdresses were part of a multi-colored costume that included a large beaded mask with large circular ears, mbap mteng, a cloth cloth, ndop, decorated with monkey fur, and a leopard belt. These dances were usually performed during festive ceremonies and funerals. Initially made with parrot feathers, these hats today use wild guinea fowl feathers, the rarity of which results in a high cost.
The feathers are attached to wooden strips covered with fabric, arranged around a circular frame consolidated by a wicker fiber basket. Kosi society, which was originally composed of valiant warriors, evolved into ...


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150.00

Hemba Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Hemba Statue

Janiform fetish sculpture kabeja, also used among the Luba, and among the Kasongo who call them kakuji. The top is hollowed out in order to receive the bijimba, a load composed of magical elements from the natural, human and plant environment. Each clan had a kabeji sculpture intended for protection and healing. But this type of fetish could also be reserved for individual use. Grainy matte patina, drying cracks.
The Hemba form a subgroup of the Luba ethnic group living in the southeast of DR Congo, east of the Lualaba River, and are especially renowned for their singiti statuary representing chiefs . Formerly under the domination of the Luba, these farmers and hunters practiced ancestor worship by means of effigies long attributed to the Luba. Their society brings together ...


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190.00

Pende Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Pende Mask

Belgian collection of African art
African Pende Mbangu "disease" masks, also known as Bwala-Bwala, exaggerately depict the symptoms of illnesses such as epilepsy or facial paralysis, often attributed to rituals of witchcraft. These comedy masks are worn by dancers wearing hats decorated with guinea fowl, coucal or turaco feathers, or sometimes lumbandu, a crown of leaves. They often have a hump on their back, thus accentuating the disabled appearance of the character. The Pende masks, established in the upper Kwango region, are distinguished by their bent noses and distorted mouths, as well as their contrasting color areas. They have a characteristic semi-matte patina.
The Western Pende live along the banks of the Kwilu, while the Easterners have settled on the banks of the ...


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160.00

Sukuma Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Sukuma Mask

Belgian African art collection.
African mask appearing in Tanzania during the dance ceremonies of the dry season. Geometric lines accentuated by linear scarifications. Reddish matte patina, erosions. Height with base: 39 cm.
The Luo, Kuria, Haya and Ziba, the Kéréwé, Karagwé, Sukuma and Nyamézi are established in the central western and central region of Tanzania. Along the shores of Lakes Tanganyika and Nyasa, and Lake Nyassa, the Ha, Jiji, Bendé, Tongwé, Holoholo, Fipa, Manbwé, Kondé, Kisi and Ngoni produced figurative statues, terracotta sculptures and inset masks of teeth.


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230.00

Sukuma Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Sukuma Mask

African mask associated with dry season dance ceremonies in Tanzania. Linear scarifications divide the face of which the amplitude of the jaw forms a particularity. Thin sticks represent the teeth in the hollowed-out mouth in a rectangle. Remains of a headdress at the top. Velvety gray patina, erosions. Satin patina.
In the southern coastal region of Tanzania, around Dar-es-Salaam, a relatively homogeneous group produced most of the artistic productions. It includes the Swahili, Kaguru, Doé, Kwéré, Luguru, Zaramo, Kami. The second region is made up of a territory covering southern Tanzania to Mozambique, where some Makonde and the Yao, the Ngindo, Mwéra, and Makua live. In the North-East of Tanzania, the Chaga, Paré, Chamba, Zigua, Massaï, Iraqw, Gogo, and Héhé have an artistic ...


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180.00

Kusu figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kusu figure

Unlike the Janiform Kabeja figures, this female statuette of the Lubaisé Kusus, probably linked to fertility rituals, is the incarnation of an ancestor. It was in fact under the Hemba influence in particular that the cult of ancestors was supported by statuary evoking heroes or chiefs, or the mythical ancestor Soba. Greyish black patina, slightly satin-like.
Damaged base.


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190.00

Kusu figure
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Kusu figure

Individual protection figures such as ours, used by the Hemba and the Kusu, were inspired by Songye fetishes. The magic charge, composed of ingredients of various origins, was inserted at the top of the head where an orifice remains.
Irregular satin patina, erosions and gaps at the base. The Kusu established on the left bank of the Lualaba have borrowed the artistic traditions of the Luba and the Hemba and have a caste system similar to that of the Luba.
The Hemba for their part settled in the south-east of Zaire, on the right bank of the Lualaba. Formerly under the domination of the Luba, these farmers and hunters practice ancestor worship by means of effigies long attributed to the Luba. The singiti statues were kept by the fumu mwalo and honored during ceremonies ...


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190.00

Bronze Nigeria
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Bronze Nigeria

Extract from a Belgian African tribal art collection of 17 pieces representing different subjects.

This object comes from northeastern Nigeria near Lake Chad, around Maiduguri, in the state of Borno, which is currently relatively inaccessible because it is controlled by armed Islamist groups. The dominant language is Kanuri.
It is a rare piece, associated with protective spirits, which was buried in the ground in order to preserve crops from animals or thieves. The Damosaka families, a very little known minority ethnic group in the region, had this type of ritual object. We have no information about them. This is a male figure whose hands meet in front of the bust. Very thick grainy patina of verdigris oxidation. Stone-like clumps remain on the coin.


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780.00

Luba sword
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Luba sword

This type of ceremonial weapon also served as currency among many Central African groups. The sculpted motif here is janiform, extended by a handle bearing the imprint of nails, then by a blade with a bulging center. Grainy oxidized patina, abraded oiled patina on the handle.
In Africa, before the colonial period, payments were never made in coins. Transactions were made using cowries, pearls, cattle, kola nuts, but also metals, especially iron. These primitive currencies were used during commercial and social exchanges, for dowries in particular, but could also constitute objects of parade or throwing weapons. In Sierra Leone, goods were valued against iron bars called barriferri. The king generally controlled the production or routing of the kingdom's currency. The variety of ...


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180.00

Sword Sengele
African art > Coins in bronze, black iron and other materials > Sword Sengele

br>Blade with contours curved to a horizontal end, carrying an elegantly worked handle. The center of the blade is covered with a ribbed band. Grainy oxidized patina.
The Mongo group living in northwestern Congo, is famous for its costumes, its weapons, and its metal jewelry and not for its almost non-existent statuary. The Sengele (or Basengele, sing. Musengele), related to the Boma, are a Bantu-speaking Mongo population, established in the south-west of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, west of Lake Mai- Ndombe. In Africa, before the colonial period, transactions were made using cowries, pearls, cattle, kola nuts, but also metals, especially iron. These primitive currencies were used during commercial and social exchanges, for dowries in particular, but could also come ...


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180.00

Senoufo Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Senoufo Statuette

Senoufo decorative sculpture depicting a female subject. This statuette displays the crest and traditional incisions of the group. Smooth oiled patina, slight crack along one ear.
The Senoufo, a name given to them by French settlers, are mainly made up of farmers who have dispersed between Mali, Ivory Coast, and Burkina Faso. Governed by matrilineal traditions, they are made up of clusters of dwellings called katiolo. Each of them has its own Poro association which introduces young boys from the age of seven in a succession of three cycles lasting seven years. Living in a reserved neighborhood, the sénufo sculptor, whose training spanned seven years, began with the creation of everyday objects, then, little by little, produced sculptures larger than more important.


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100.00

Boa container
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Boa container

Vase with a neck showing a human head with large ears. Sets of incised motifs decorate the sides, which show female attributes. Brown slip with reddish glints. Abrasions. Related to the Mangbetu and Zande, the Boa inhabit the savannah in the north of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Their anthropomorphic figures were undoubtedly used as part of rites charged with combating the witchcraft of the ndoki society. They are known for their mask with oversized ears, perforated like the ear pavilions of the Eastern Boa, the "bavobongo ". It gave an impressive appearance to its wearer, accentuated by the contrast of colors. The African art mask kpongadomba of the Boa was ordered by the chief kumu who offered it to the most valiant warrior. It was then kept in the hut of his wife. Some ...


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190.00

Kongo Box
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kongo Box

African statuette enclosing the abdominal cavity into which magical ingredients were introduced. The subject forms the lid of a small box. Matte brown patina, drying crack..
A clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the west African coast, in the southwest of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternity wards. The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, led by king ntotela . Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary with codified gestures in relation to their vision of the world.

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Bini Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bini Mask

This type of African mask, among the Bini, was used during ekpo rites relating to the ancestors. With an unusual appearance, this mask is distinguished by its braided headdress, its slit eyes, its wide nose and a large toothed mouth. He plays a clan dignitary.
Velvety matte patina.
The Bini, or Edo, are established around the town of Benin, in Edo State in south-central Nigeria. Originally, the inhabitants of the Kingdom of Benin, or Benin, an illustrious historical cultural and commercial center, were called the Edo, speaking Edo, although other groups mixed with them. The Igala, Yoruba and Ibo occupied the surrounding territories. The ancestors of the current Edo could be Sudanese who migrated to the region around 800 AD.


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150.00





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