The african art expertise

From african mask to statue or bronze, the first advantage, and the most important, is the certainty to buy on our website authentic and quality african artifact. Every item of our african art gallery is expertised by an expert in african art before going for sale, wich assures you a high quality purchase. Some of our african art collection items have also been aquired by famous museums.

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Our african art gallery

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Last african art items added to our catalog

Kuba jar
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba jar

Belgian African art collection
In the Kuba groups, a wide variety of these sculpted objects with figurative motifs are intended to enhance the prestige of their holder. The character whose head is hollowed out here adopts compacted proportions. Satin patina.
The extremely organized and hierarchical Kuba society placed a king or nyim at its center, inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group. This was considered to be of divine origin. Both head of the kingdom and of the bushoong chiefdom, he was attributed supernatural virtues from witchcraft or ancestors. He therefore ensured the sustainability of his subjects, whether through harvests, rain or the birth of children. These magical attributes were not hereditary, however, the king being elected by a council. Source: Kuba, ed. ...


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170.00

Kuba urn
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba urn

Prestigious Kuba-type vase, engraved with traditional frieze patterns, and carved with miniatures representing masks and turtles. Pretty satin patina. Desication cracks.
The Kuba and the tribes established between the Sankuru and Kasai rivers, including the Bushoong and Dengese also originating from the Mongo group, are renowned for the refinement of prestige objects created for members of the high ranks of their society. Several Kuba groups indeed produced anthropomorphic ceremonial objects with refined designs including cups, drinking horns and goblets. The Kuba kingdom was founded in the 16th century by the Bushoong, who are still ruled by a king today. It is the most prolific group in Western Kasai. Ritual ceremonies remained an opportunity to display decorative arts and ...


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170.00

Kuba cup
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kuba cup

This cephalomorphic cup was intended for palm oil. In the kuba groups, a wide variety of these sculptures with figurative motifs are intended to enhance the prestige of their bearer. The edges are fine and regular.
Velvety patina.


The extremely organized and hierarchical Kuba society placed a king or nyim at its center, inspiring the statuary of the ethnic group.
This was considered to be of divine origin. Both head of the kingdom and of the bushoong chiefdom, he was attributed supernatural virtues from witchcraft or ancestors. He therefore ensured the sustainability of his subjects, whether through harvests, rain or the birth of children. These magical attributes were not hereditary, however, as the king was elected by a council.
Source: Kuba, ed. ...


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170.00

Lobi Rider
African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Lobi Rider

The Lobi have a great diversity of African sculptures in wrought iron, for protective purposes. This is a figure with a very stylized silhouette. Ocher brown grainy patina.
The populations of the same cultural region, grouped together under the name "lobi", form a fifth of the inhabitants of Burkina Faso. Few in number in Ghana, they have also settled in the north of Côte d'Ivoire. It was at the end of the 18th century that the Lobi, coming from North Ghana, established themselves among the indigenous Thuna and Puguli, the Dagara, the Dian, the Gan and the Birifor. The Lobi believe in a Creator God named Thangba Thu, whom they address through the worship of many intermediary spirits, the Thil, these the latter being supposed to protect them, with the help of the diviner, against a ...


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240.00

Dogon Door
African art > Doors, shutters, ladders dogon wood > Dogon Door

Closing systems of the Sudanese regions in African art .
This shutter is made up of an assembly of two vertical boards. Highly stylized anthropomorphic figures enliven the surface. They are related to the rich Dogon cosmogony. These motifs represent previous generations, also mythical ancestors, but the owners of the attic also appear frequently.
Ocher light brown patina.
The shutters blocked the openings of the cereal granary (sorghum or millet) established in height in order to protect rodents. A ladder provided access. The patterns present on the doors in Mali, apart from their decorative value, are intended to deter the intruder, whether human or animal, from entering. The locks and the doors are cut in wood chosen according to the function of the building in ...


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280.00

Bamana Horse
African art > Puppets, dolls > Bamana Horse

Ritual sculpture intervening in the fourth initiatory rank of the Koré society of the Bamana, Bambara, this cane is named, like the horse mask, Kore Duga or the vulture of Kore b>. The name of the mask refers to the satirical and trivial behavior of the dancer-jester who straddles the stick during his performance. It has various objects associated with the knowledge dispensed by the Koré, the last initiatory society of the Bamana.
The handle has a flat and curved seat representing the saddle and is extended by a removable head. Velvety dark patina, erosions.
Lit. : "Horse and rider of black Africa" G. Massa, ed. SEPIA.


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240.00

Bembe figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bembe figure

Janiform sculpted bust associated with the cult of the water spirit Kalunga, among the many nature spirits revered by the Buyu. The Bembe have the same type of figures.
Satin patina of use, traces of kaolin and pink ocher, desiccation cracks.
Migratory flows have mixed Bembe, Lega, Buyu (Buye) or Boyo, Binji and Bangubangu within the same territories. The Bassikassingo, considered by some to be a Buyu sub-clan, are however not of Bembe origin although they live in their territory , the work of Biebuyck having made it possible to retrace their history. Organized in lineages, they borrowed the association of Bwami from the Lega. The bembe and boyo traditions are relatively similar They worship the spirits of nature, water specifically among the Boyo, Buyu , but also the ...


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140.00

Grebo Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Grebo Mask

African art from the banks of the Cavally and its fantastic masks.
Colorful expressionism for this version of the Kru mask combining a flat surface with tubular growths associated with the faculties of clairvoyance, a nasal bridge and a quadrangular mouth. Abraded speckled matte patina.
The Kru are divided into twenty-four sub-groups, including the Grebo, who live in southern Liberia and southwest Côte d'Ivoire. Their leader is the bodio, who lives recluse in a hut, the takae. Their masks with tubular growths would be of oubi origin, and could symbolize the mythical creatures that inhabit the forests on the banks of the Cavally, to which the people address themselves through ritual ceremonies. The interest of cubist painters and modern sculptors for the abstract forms of ...


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290.00

Ashanti Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Ashanti Bronze

The Ashanti , Asante , mastered the art of lost wax casting, the copper metal being sacred, in order to produce ritual and prestigious objects, such as < b> Kuduo made of brass which were intended, in addition to the storage of gold dust, for family and royal domestic worship. This semi-spherical mask intended for hanging is adorned with an abundance of fine decorative motifs. Dark patina with green inlays.
The Ashanti are one of the ethnic groups of Ghana (former "Gold Coast"), of the group of Akans, living in a region covered with forests. Just like other people living in the central and southern part of Ghana, they speak a language of the Twi group. This people considers the woman as the final arbiter of all decisions. Fertility and children are the most common themes ...


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280.00

Baoule statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Baoule statue

Baoulé African art ancestor statue, this Waka-Sona, Waka sran, "being of wood" in Baoulé, embodies aassié oussou, b>being of the earth, genius of nature. It is one of a type of statues intended to be used as a medium tool by the komien, or "komienfoué" soothsayers, the latter being selected by the spirits asye usu in order to communicate revelations from the afterlife or blolo . The second type of statues are the spouses of the afterlife, male, the blolo bian or female, the blolo bia.
In order to give them hold, the braided beards of Baoulé men were coated with shea butter. . Black satin patina. erosions.


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180.00

Ndengese Figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ndengese Figure

People of Central Africa established in Kasai, neighbor of the Kuba, the Ndengese form one of the clans descended from a common ancestor Mongo, some of them originating of the Upper Nile. They produced primitive art statues with absent or truncated lower limbs, covered with graphic symbols, symbolizing the prestige of the chief. The flared hairstyle surmounted by a top appendage is characteristic of the hairstyles acquired by the Totshi chiefs belonging to the ikoho association and evokes particular proverbs. It symbolizes respect, intelligence and maturity. The face seems in meditation. The neck has rings. Lozenge scarifications in relief, in order to differentiate socially and aesthetically, are traced on the bust. The clasped hands highlight the protruding umbilicus. Abraded dark ...


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390.00

Songola Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Songola Mask

Plane mask to be suspended, whose reliefs come down to the edges dividing the face. The gaping mouth gives it a very special character. Grainy white patina, erosions.
Mixed by alliance with the Lega, Ngengele and Zimba, the Songola or Babili , or Goa , are governed by the elders of the lineages. They borrowed from the Luba and Songye the institution Luhuna composed of dignitaries and that of Bwami by their lega wives. The Songola live by hunting and fishing, they devote themselves to sculpture, although the objects associated with the Bwami cult come from the Lega. Among their reduced statuary, the figures of ancestors of the Nsubi society evoke those of the Mbole, other sculptures were kept in baskets as among the Lega. Masks such as ours were used during Nsindi initiation ...


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180.00

Songola mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Songola mask

Coated in contrasting hues, this African mask was intended for the highest ranks of the Nsubi society, the latter also initiating wives. This almost flat mask, where the forehead and the nasal bridge form a slight relief, borrows certain features from the Kumu and Mbole masks. The damaged nose bears a resinous aggregate.
Velvety matte patina.
Height on base: 46 cm.
Mingled by alliance with the Lega, Ngengele and Zimba, the Songola are governed by the elders of the lineages. They borrowed from the Luba and Songye the institution Luhuna composed of dignitaries and that of Bwami by their lega wives. The Songola live by hunting and fishing, they devote themselves to sculpture, although the objects associated with the Bwami cult come from the Lega. Among their reduced ...


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180.00

Ogoni mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Ogoni mask

This face mask named Elu consists of an oval face with thick raised lips of burgundy pigment, topped with an anthropomorphic figure that could symbolize an ancestor.
Abraded matte patina, desiccation cracks.
The Ogoni live along the coasts of Nigeria, near the mouth of the Cross-River, south of the Igbo and west of the Ibibio. Their sculptures vary from village to village, but are mainly famous for some of their masks with articulated jaws revealing sharp teeth. Their masks were usually worn at funerals, festivities accompanying plantings and harvests, but also nowadays to welcome distinguished guests. The acrobatic demonstrations linked to the celebration karikpo , and accompanied by the drum kere karikpo , were also an opportunity to exhibit various zoomorphic masks.


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290.00

Pende club
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Pende club

Ceremonial club-scepter whose shaft bears a pattern sculpted in the image of the "phumbu" chief's mask. The club is dug with a cavity. Orange wood, satin finish, coated with a partially abraded black patina.
Desication cracks.
Height on base: 50 cm.
The Western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the Eastern settled on the banks of the Kasaï downstream from Tshikapa. The influences of neighboring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity, the Mbuya masks, realistic, produced every ten years, take on a festive function, and embody different characters, including the chief, the diviner and his wife, the prostitute, the possessed, etc... The masks of initiation and those of ...


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290.00

Kuba velvet
African art > Textiles, Kuba velvet, Ncak nsueha Bushoong > Kuba velvet

The African art and the refinement of Kuba weaving.
Produced in Zaire by the Shoowa, Bashoowa, subgroup Kuba, these fabrics forming true paintings of primitive art, are made of a raffia textile base on which threads are cut short, forming a velvet effect accentuated by contrasts in tone. The geometrical patterns formed represent the ethnic group's body scarifications or the decorations of sculptures. These refined fabrics were intended to be used at the royal court, as a seat or cover, to enhance its prestige. In many cases, they were used as currency, or followed their owners to the grave, covering the body of the deceased. It was King Shamba Bolongongo who introduced the technique of velvet weaving to Kuba country in the 17th century. He had previously introduced the Kuba ...


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120.00

Rungu mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Rungu mask

Naturalistic mask, pierced with large eyes surrounded by a groove and a wide mouth. The short, pointed nose is incised with a traditional scarification running up to the forehead, while parallel lines are inscribed on the face. The functions of this mask remain unknown.

Beautiful satin patina, mottled, small accidents, desication cracks.
Tribe of the Tabwa group, the Rungu are established in a region between the R.D.C. (Democratic Rep. of Congo), Zambia and Tanzania. Under the influence of the neighboring Lubas and Bemba, the Rungu produced prestigious objects intended for dignitaries, stools, combs, spoons and scepters, frequently adorned with figures of couples or twins. Their king, called mwéné tafuna, lives in Zambia. A women's association, Kamanya, has dolls such ...


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280.00

Bamana mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Bamana mask

Ti-wara masks in African art.
It would be an animal - genius called Ciwara who would have taught the Bambara to cultivate the land. The latter remember the myth through crest masks, of which this example forms a rare abstract version from the Sikasso region, accompanied by stylized female figures. Velvety matte patina, cracks.
Worn at the top of the head and held in place by a basketry hat, these crests accompanied the dancers during the rituals of the tòn, an association dedicated to agricultural work. The masks traversed the field while leaping in order to drive out from this one the nyama, malefic emanations, and to detect any danger, or to flush out the malevolent genies who could ravish the soul of the cultivated plants as well as the life force of their ...


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280.00



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