The african art expertise

From african mask to statue or bronze, the first advantage, and the most important, is the certainty to buy on our website authentic and quality african artifact. Every item of our african art gallery is expertised by an expert in african art before going for sale, wich assures you a high quality purchase. Some of our african art collection items have also been aquired by famous museums.

The african art expertise

From african mask to statue or bronze, the first advantage, and the most important, is the certainty to buy on our website authentic and quality african artifact. Every item of our african art gallery is expertised by an expert in african art before going for sale, wich assures you a high quality purchase. Some of our african art collection items have also been aquired by famous museums.

The price

A quick look at our site will show you that we propose the best prices in the african art. This is possible thanks to the fact that we have been pionneers in selling african art artifacts online, we have optimised our logistic to reduce our operationnal costs. This directly benefits to our clients.

Our african art gallery

Active on internet since 1999, we are also a physical african art gallery, do not hesitate to visit us, from monday to saturday 10AM to 6PM, and sunday only on appointment, at 73 Rue de Tournai 7333 Tertre en Belgique.
You can also reach us by phone +32 (0)65.529.100

You are antique dealer,gallerist or decorator, do not hesitate to contact us.
You want to sell your african art items ? We buy african art collections

Last african art items added to our catalog

Teke Statue
African art > The fetish, this emblematic object of primitive art > Teke Statue

Devoid of its mystical "Bonga" charge, the cavity of this teke-type sculpted figure makes the bust protrude in powerful volume, seeming to bend thick legs. Under the headdress, the face with its clear, bulging gaze offers cubist features. Smooth dark mahogany patina. Lacks, drying crack.
Established between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized into chiefdoms whose leader was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu, had the right of life or death over his family, the importance of which determined his prestige. The chief of the clan, Ngantsié, kept the great protective fetish Tar Mantsié which supervised all the ceremonies. It is the powerful sorcerer, healer and soothsayer who "charged" the individual statuettes with ...


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490.00

Kwele Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Kwele Mask

Kwele Pipibuze mask, Pipibudze, ("the man") symbolizing the light and clairvoyance necessary to fight against the forces of witchcraft. This mask is topped with a horn that comes back in front of the face. This type of mask was not always intended to be worn, but adorned the walls of the huts. Kaolin residue, minor cracks.
Depending on the presence of horns and their arrangement, the masks are called pibibudzé, Ekuku zokou, etc...and are associated with ancestors or forest spirits, "ekuk". A tribe of the Kota group, the Kwélé, Bakwélé, live in the forest on the northern border of the Republic of Congo. They live from hunting, agriculture and metallurgy. Practicing the cult called Bwété borrowed from the Ngwyes, which was accompanied by obligatory initiation rites, they used ...


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340.00

Bura Head
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Bura Head

Belgian collection of African art
The fragmentary Bura sculpture, with its stylized features, is accompanied by gaps, cracks and restorations. It is not accompanied by TL.
The Bura culture, centered in the Niger River valley of Niger and Burkina Faso, is recognized for its Iron Age, spanning from the 3rd century CE until the 13th century. Recently discovered in 1975, it remains relatively unknown despite archaeological excavations beginning in 1983. Artifacts from the Bura culture include terracotta funerary urns, iron arrowheads and brass jewelry. Among their most notable achievements, the Bura produced terracotta equestrian figures.


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150.00

Songye Whistle
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Songye Whistle

Belgian collection of African art

These collector talismans, worn as pendants, were used during collective hunts to warn the team or the dogs and guide the prey towards an objective. The whistling sound could be modulated using the lateral appendage. Specialist hunters used a variety of ritual objects to ensure the success of their hunts.
Beautiful mahogany patina. Height on base: 20 cm.
The Songye came from the Shaba region in the DRC and settled between the Lualaba River and the Sankuru River in the middle of the savannah and forests. They are governed by the yakitengé and by local chiefs. The Bwadi secret society, however, counteracts their power. Their masculine masks, with occult powers, were exhibited during punitive and disciplinary expeditions. Their appearances ...


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120.00

Mbala mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Mbala mask

Among the sacred symbols of authority (Pindi) of the Mbala, this voluminous bakungu-type mask wears an enveloping headdress topped with a high plateau structure. The look with lowered, half-closed eyelids is discreetly veiled in pink ocher. Grainy matte patina, raffia adornment. Minor abrasions and cracks. Erosions at the top of the plateau.
Coming from Angola in the 17th century, the Mbala established themselves in the north-west of Zaire and in the east among the Pelende, the Suku, the Pende, and the Yaka. They are made up of clans led by the maternal uncle. The chief was in charge of the cult of the ancestors, although quite restricted. Following a retreat of a few days, royal insignia and charms were awarded to him, intended to combat the powers opposing hunting, social peace, ...


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390.00

Fang Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Fang Statue

The African art of the Byeri cult consists of anthropomorphic sculptures embodying the ancestor and acting as "guardians". Dark satin patina, scattered grainy residue. Desiccation cracks.
The peoples known as Fang, or "Pahouins", described as conquering warriors, successively invaded from village to village the vast region between Sanaga in Cameroon and Ogooué in Gabon, between the 18th and the beginning of the 20th century. . The boxes containing the relics of illustrious ancestors were guarded by the oldest man in the village, the “esa”. Topped with a statue or head which acted as guardian of the “byeri” boxes, they were stored in a dark corner of the hut, supposed to divert evil influences towards someone else. They were also used during initiation ceremonies for young people ...


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380.00

Lengola Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Lengola Statuette

Traditional African art of the forest tribes. This sculpture is reminiscent of lega masks, but differs by the long nose and the discretion or absence of a mouth. Dark satin patina, kaolin residue.
The Lengola, are established near the Metoko in the center of the Congolese basin between the Lomami and Lualaba rivers, people of the primary forest dedicated to the worship of a single God, a rare monotheism in Africa. Their society, Bukota, welcoming both men and women, is the equivalent of the Bwami association of the Lega. Their sculptures, subject to the influence of neighboring Mbole, Lega and Binja, played a role during initiation, funeral or circumcision ceremonies, and were then placed on the tomb of high-ranking initiates. Each of these figures had a name and a meaning for ...


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240.00

Pende mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Pende mask

This African mask of initiation, Mbuya, emanates from the Pende of the West whose Yaka influence is notable in the slightly upturned nose facture. The wide lowered eyelids indicate the Pende tradition of not staring in public.
This African Pendé mask has a headdress made of cloth and raffia fibers.
Total height on base: 42 cm.
The western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the eastern ones have settled on the banks of the Kasai downstream from Tshikapa. The influences of the neighboring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba, and Salampasu have been imprinted on their extensive tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity the Mbuya masks, realistic, produced every ten years, have a festive function, and embody different characters, including ...


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160.00

Pende Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Pende Mask

The African masks of "illness", Pende Mbangu (deformed mouth) or Bwala-Bwala, illustrate, by their outraged features, the patient in epilepsy crisis or the result of facial paralysis caused by witchcraft rituals. The dancer who wears this comedy mask is wearing a feathered hat made of gifuatu of guinea fowl, coucal or touraco, or of lumbandu, a crown of leaves. It is also often equipped with a bump on the back, exaggerating the handicapped aspect of the character. This mask of the Pende established in the Upper Kwango is distinguished by its bent nose and a deformed mouth. It is divided into areas of contrasting colors. Semi-matt patina.
The Western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the Easterners settled on the banks of the Kasai downstream from Tshikapa. The ...


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160.00

Pende Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Pende Mask

This moralizing mask of the Pende established in Upper Kwango, Pende Mbangu or Bwala-Bwala, illustrates the result of facial paralysis caused by witchcraft rituals. He dances among masks embodying other characters. The dancer who wears this comedy mask wears a feather hat gifuatu of guinea fowl, coucal or turaco, or the lumbandu, a crown of leaves. It is also often fitted with a hump on its back, exaggerating the character's handicapped appearance. Abraded matte patina, erosions.
The western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the eastern people have settled on the banks of the Kasai downstream from Tshikapa. The influences of neighboring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity, the ...


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160.00

Boulou statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Boulou statue

Sculpture with massive volumes, featuring a stocky gorilla whose hands rest on its abdomen.
This animal statue has a heterogeneous semi-granular patina, locally abraded. Misses and desiccation cracks.
The Boulou, an ethnic group of the Fang, live in Cameroon, on the border of Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and Congo, on a vast plateau within the equatorial forest near the Bakwele, whose habits and customs are comparable. Like the Fang of southern Cameroon with their white masks of justice, the Boulou also used the Ngil ritual to counter witchcraft and poisoning. Future initiates, following their integration into the secret society, identify with the Ngi , fierce emblematic gorilla. The Ngil society, which carried out, among other things, executions of witches, was banned ...


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390.00

Kota Reliquary
African art > Reliquaries, statues > Kota Reliquary

French African art collection.
This African sculpture "mbulu-ngulu", plated with metal according to the kota tradition, forms a stylized image of the ancestor, a coat of arms also for the clan, and is generally distinguished by the shape of the headdress , variable depending on the region.
The Kota inhabit the eastern part of Gabon, which is rich in iron ore, and some in the Republic of Congo. The blacksmith, in addition to wood carving, made tools for agricultural work as well as ritual weapons. The sculptures playing the role of "medium" between the living and the dead who watched over the descendants, were associated with the rites at the bwete , comparable to those of the Fang . They surmounted the baskets containing the mortuary remains of the ancestors of high ...


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280.00

Kongo Pipe
African art > African pipes in wood, in bronze > Kongo Pipe

Kongo figurative pipe whose bowl is carved with a face with realistic features. Wicker covers the handle. Semi-matte black patina.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembe, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by King Ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. In the 13th century, the Kongo people, led by their king Ne Kongo, settled in a region at the crossroads of the borders between the current DRC, Angola and Gabon. Two centuries later, the Portuguese came into contact with the Kongo and converted their king to Christianity. This king, also called ntotela, controlled the appointment of court and provincial officials.


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180.00

Baule Chair
African art > Chair, palaver seat, throne, stool > Baule Chair

Seat named ketekle devolved to notables, but accompanying, among the Wé, the dance of young girls during celebrations associated with initiations. The accessory marks the approval of the family ancestor who owned this prestigious object. Very nice patina of use, ocher brown, velvety. Desication cracks, small accidents.


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180.00

Zela Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Zela Statuette

Small statuette for individual use, whose head is pierced with a hole at the top for ritual purposes. A touching asymmetry of the ears is to be noted. Mottled patina of use.
Formerly subject to the Luba, then to the Lundas, the Zela have adopted a large part of their customs and traditions. Established between the Luvua River and Lake Kisalé, they are today organized into four chiefdoms under the supervision of leaders of Luba origin. They venerate a primordial couple frequently represented in statuary, mythical ancestors, and dedicate offerings to the spirits of nature. In addition to their powerful Mbudye society, the Zela also have a women's initiation association called kisungu. ( Luba , Roberts, 5 Continents; "Treasures of Africa" ed. of the Museum of Tervuren; "100 ...


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250.00

Zela Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Zela Statue

Carved from dense wood, this African statue offers numerous details accompanied by inlays of upholstery nails. The hairstyle organized in large parallel shells and the body scarifications are specific to the Zela.
Dark oiled patina, lighter residual incrustations. Erosions and desiccation cracks.
Formerly subject to the Luba, then to the Lundas, the Zela adopted a large part of their uses and traditions. Established between the Luvua River and Lake Kisalé, they are today organized into four chiefdoms under the supervision of leaders of Luba origin. They venerate a primordial couple frequently represented in statuary, mythical ancestors, and make offerings to the spirits of nature. Ref. : “Luba” 5 Continents. Rooberts.


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250.00

Dogon Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Dogon Mask

Old Dogon walu mask, animal linked to the Dogon cosmogony, carved in dense wood. High rectangular depressions have been fitted with cavities for viewing. The filmy patina, locally grainy, is abraded by time. Desication crack.
Alongside Islam, Dogon religious rites are organized around four main cults: the Lébé, relating to fertility, the Wagem, cult of the ancestors under the authority of the patriarch, the Binou invoking the world of spirits, and the Awa mask society regarding funerals. The "dama" is a ceremony dedicated to restoring the order of things following bereavement. It was originally to protect themselves from the "nyama" (soul) of the victim that the Dogon carved a mask in the image of an animal. Guarantor of order, the mask of the Walu charges the spectators too close ...


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450.00

Tabwa figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Tabwa figure

Ex-German African art collection. African statuette with linear scarifications composed of small checkerboards, and a headdress chiseled with rhombuses. The position is frontal, half-bent legs anchored on a circular base, the hands resting on either side of a prominent umbilicus, enhancing the lineage of the ancestor represented. Semi-satin orange-brown patina. Desiccation cracks.
The Tabwa ("scarify" and "write") are an ethnic group found in southeastern DRC, around Lake Tanganyika. Tribes in this region, such as the Tumbwe , worship ancestors mipasi through carvings held by chiefs or sorcerers. Simple cultivators with no centralized power, the Tabwa federated around tribal chiefs after coming under the influence of the Luba. It was mainly during this period that their ...


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180.00



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