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African art - Commander stick:

The batons of command are one of the bases of the tribal herarchy. They are the property of the tribal chief and give him his authority. Often finely carved and always endowed with a patina of use, they are objects that, when plinths, are of the most beautiful effect in an interior.


Kongo Sceptre
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Kongo Sceptre

Kongo-type emblem of royal power in the form of an effigy of a chief in a seated position, extended by a handle incised with fine checkered motifs. Satin black patina.
The Kongos (also known as Bakongos, which is the plural of N'Kongo in Kikongo, live on the Atlantic Ocean coast of Africa from Pointe-Noire, (Republic of Congo) to Luanda (Angola ) in the South and as far as the province of Bandundu (Democratic Republic of Congo). Superbly crafted, the Kongo command scepters constituted, among the jewelry, weapons, recades and statuary, the regalia essential to their status and the power of their reign. The ornaments, pictograms and effigies carved on the sticks evoked proverbs, illustrated the qualities of a chief, told, from section to section, the history of the tribe and ...


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180.00

Kongo Statuette
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Kongo Statuette

The naturalistic sculptures of the Kongo clans.

Anthropomorphic carved pattern stick top. The face offers a subtle and neat modeling highlighting an intense concentrated expression. Fingered hands are joined, the lower part of the body merges into the faceted base. Light golden patina, lustrous. Desication cracks. Height on base: 25 cm.
The Vili , the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembe, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, led by King ntotela . Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary endowed with a codified gesture in relation to their vision of the world. In addition to their weapons and prestigious objects and ...


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150.00

Ewe Scepter
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Ewe Scepter

A prestigious object reserved for chiefs and dignitaries, this badge of power whose end is sculpted with a female figure evokes notions of fertility and abundance. Matte yellow-brown patina, black highlights. Minor abrasions and cracks from use.
The Ewe, often confused with the Minas, are the largest ethnic group in Togo. They are also found as minorities in Ghana, Benin, Ivory Coast and Nigeria. Although we have little historical information about them, it seems that their establishment in their current location is the result of invasions and conflicts that broke out during the 17th century.
The morphology, presenting a musculature indicated by the ringed limbs and a characteristic posture, recalls here that of the lagoon regions. The figure with the powerful neck has a ...


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280.00

Chokwe Staff
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Chokwe Staff

Les régalia des Tchokwe dans l'art africain
Emblême de pouvoir faisant partie des régalia, marque d'ostentation, ce sceptre représente la puissance politique et symbolique.  Sculpture en ronde-bosse réalisée par un artiste au service du chef, associée au culte thérapeutique de type Hamba, la figure féminine Chokwe ou Lwena incarne l'ancêtre féminin qui est censée garantir les naissances ou la guérison. Le personnage qui illustre également la seconde épouse du chef mythique Chibinda Ilunga arbore une coiffure bombée telle un casque.
Patine brune satinée, résidus de kaolin.
Paisiblement installés en Angola oriental jusqu'au XVIème siècle, les Chokwé ont ensuite été soumis à l'empire lunda dont ils ont hérité un nouveau système hiérarchique et la sacralité du pouvoir. ...


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160.00

Kongo Sceptre
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Kongo Sceptre


The Kongos (also known as Bakongos, which is the plural of N'Kongo in Kikongo, live on the Atlantic Ocean coast of Africa Pointe-Noire, (Republic of Congo) until Luanda (Angola) in the South and as far as the province of Bandundu (Democratic Republic of Congo) Superbly crafted, the Kongo command scepters constituted, among the jewels, weapons, recades and statuary, the regalia essential to their status and power. ornaments, pictographs and effigies carved on the sticks evoked proverbs, illustrated the qualities of a chief, told, from section to section, the history of the tribe and insisted on the qualities required to reign. belonging to the royal entourage also benefited from the same coded iconography.
This prestigious emblem comes in the form of an effigy of a chef in a ...


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160.00

Yoruba Sceptre
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Yoruba Sceptre

Brandished in the left hand during ritual dances, this staff sculpted with the figure of a follower of the god Sango is surmounted by a stylized motif associated with the double stone ax that the god would hurl to earth during storms. The physiognomy is characteristic of Yoruba art, illustrated by the large almond-shaped eyes and the cheek scarifications. These sculptures refer to the god of thunder and youth Shango, or Sango. The latter would be the mythical ancestor of the kings of Oyo. He was also the protector of the twins, whose occurrence was very common in the region.
It is a deity feared for its unpredictability, and venerated because it would bring beneficial rains to crops. It is also to her that the fertility of women is attributed.

Abraded black ...


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280.00

Koré Stick
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Koré Stick

Ritual instrument used in the fourth initiatory rank of the Bamana Kore society, Bambara, this cane is named, like the horse mask, Kore Duga or the Kore vulture b>. The name of the mask refers to the satirical behavior of the dancer-jester who straddles the stick during his performance. It has various objects associated with the knowledge dispensed by the Koré, the last initiatory society of the Bamana. The handle has a slightly curved flat seat and is extended by a sculpted head. Black brown patina, erosions and cracks, lack.


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280.00

Kongo Cane
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Kongo Cane

Pommel gebeeldhouwd met een vrouwenfiguur, uitgebreid met een gedeelte in hout en vervolgens metaal.
Glanzend zwarte patina, lichte gebreken en schaafwonden.
Gevestigd op de plateaus van de Volksrepubliek Congo ex. Brazzaville, en niet te verwarren met de Bembe-groep van het noordelijke Tanganinyika-meer, werd de kleine groep Babembé, Béembé, beïnvloed door de Téké-riten en -cultuur, maar vooral door die van de Kongo's. De Béembé, gevestigd in de huidige Republiek Congo, vormden oorspronkelijk het koninkrijk Kongo, met de Vili, Yombé, Bwendé en Woyo. Ze stonden onder de voogdij van koning ntotela, gekozen door de gouverneurs. De handel in ivoor, koper en slaven waren de belangrijkste middelen van deze weinig bekende groep tot de kolonisatie. Het hoofd van het dorp, ...


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150.00

Yoruba Scepter
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Yoruba Scepter

Brandished in the left hand during ritual dances, this stick Osé Sango, or Oshe Shango, presents in detail a figure of a follower of the god Sango. These ceremonial sculptures refer to the god of thunder and youth Shango, or Sango. The latter would be the mythical ancestor of the kings of Oyo. He was also the protector of the twins, whose occurrence was very common in the region.
Divinity feared for its unpredictability, it is venerated to provide crops with beneficial rains. Female fertility is also attributed to him.
Dark satin patina. Erosions (base).
Yoruba society is organized into various associations whose roles vary. If the masculine Egbe society reinforces social norms, the aro federates the farmers. The gelede has more esoteric and religious aims. The notables ...


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380.00

Yoruba Sceptre
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Yoruba Sceptre

Liturgical objects in African art of the Yoruba
Figure of follower of the god Sango, carried in the left hand during ritual tribal dances, this stick is carved with a kneeling female figure. The physiognomy is characteristic of Yoruba art, illustrated by the large almond-shaped eyes and cheek scarifications. These figures are dedicated to the god of thunder and youth Shango, or Sango, according to the Yoruba religion. The latter would be the mythical ancestor of the kings of Oyo. He was also the protector of the twins, whose occurrence was very frequent in the region. It is a divinity feared for its unpredictability, and revered because it would bring beneficial rains to crops. Women's fertility is also attributed to her.
Satin brown patina, abrasions. Height with ...


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160.00

Kongo pestle
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kongo pestle

Old grain pestle whose center is carved with two faces. One of them is represented sticking out his tongue, a gesture with symbolic connotation in rituals against witchcraft. Smooth and glossy honey-coloured patina. Desication cracks.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembe, the Bwende, the Dondo/Kamba, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by King Ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. From comparable beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary endowed with codified gestures in keeping with their vision of the world. Their realistic masks took part in initiation ceremonies and the funerals of notables, and their nailed fetish statues, nkondi, were charged with magical elements ...


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280.00

Dogon Staff
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Dogon Staff

The prestigious domolo crosier worn by Dogon men on their shoulders and sometimes found on altars and in binu sanctuaries recalls the insignia of the yona association. , the Yo domolo , or even Yo dyommodo , which forms the emblem of the "ritual thieves". These hoe-shaped emblems evoke a horse's head, the primordial animal of creation. Ritual patina, residual encrustations. Desication cracks.
The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, their esotericism, their myths and legends. Their population is estimated at around 300,000 souls living in the southwest of the Niger bend in the Mopti region of Mali. The Dogon blacksmiths form an endogamous caste called irim They now produce weapons, tools, and also work with wood.
"Masters of fire", they are also supposed to ...


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260.00

Pende stick
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Pende stick

This stick carved with a pattern like the masks of the group is part of the chief's figurative insignia. Glossy black brown patina. 36 cm on base.
The Western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the Eastern settled on the banks of the Kasaï downstream from Tshikapa. The influences of neighboring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity, the Mbuya masks, realistic, produced every ten years, take on a festive function, and embody different characters, including the chief, the diviner and his wife, the prostitute, the possessed, etc... The masks of initiation and those of power, the minganji, represent the ancestors and occur successively during the same ceremonies, agricultural festivals, ...


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280.00

Hemba Sceptre
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Hemba Sceptre

Hemba African art.
Like the kibangos of the Luba, this command staff, a prestigious object, refers to the history of the ancestor or that of his clan. The sculpted motif forming the pommel, extended by a ringed neck, represents a singiti ancestor. Dark brown satin patina. Desication erosions and cracks.
The Hemba, established in the south-east of Zaire, on the right bank of the Lualaba, were for a long time subjected to the neighboring Luba empire, which had on their culture, their religion and their art a certain influence. Ancestor worship, whose effigies have long been attributed to the Luba, is central to Hemba society. Genealogy is indeed the guarantor of privileges and the distribution of land. All aspects of the community are imbued with the authority of the ancestors. ...


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280.00

Lulua Command Stick
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Sceptre Lulua

Prestigious stick with a cephalomorph handle extended from a ring section forming the neck. Beautiful abrased patina, slight gaps, desictating cracks.
The different types of statues Luluwa, Lulua, or Bena Lulua, with multiple scarifications, glorify local leaders, motherhood, fertility and the female figure. Protruding scarifications appear on the front of the perosnnage. .
Grey granular inpatine whose localized erosions reveal a clear wood. The Lulua, or Béna Lulua from West Africa, settled in the south of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Their caste-based social structure is similar to that of the Luba. They produced few masks, but especially statues of ancestors representing the ideal warrior, mulalenga wa nkashaama, as well as the head of the Leopard Society and ...


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270.00





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