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African art - Stick of command, chieftaincy:

The batons of command are one of the bases of the tribal herarchy. They are the property of the tribal chief and give him his authority. Often finely carved and always endowed with a patina of use, they are objects that, when plinths, are of the most beautiful effect in an interior.


Guro Statue
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Guro Statue

The spectacular elongation of the bust here forms like a stick supported by curved lower limbs. The head, for its part, refers to the masks of the style qualified as guro-bete for lack of reliable information. The central part, cleared up, would indicate a frequent prehension. Satin garnet black patina.
of the Baoulé. Their respective sculptures, by their morphology, bear witness to their close relationship. Priest and diviner share the predominant ritual functions among the Guro. Secret associations worship the geniuses of nature, through the masks in which the spirits are supposed to reside. Their protective spirits called zuzu were worshiped through statues placed on altars. The Bété form a tribe established on the left bank of the Sassandra River in the south-west of the Ivory ...


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390.00  312.00

Luba Scepter
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Luba Scepter

Among the emblems of prestige this type of Luba dignitary scepter. True sources of information on their owners and local history, the scepters display a varied iconography. Embodying the deceased parents bakishi or the bavidye spirits, "Mvidie" intermediaries between god and men, the female figure offers keloid scars in relief specific to the Kongo clans. These make it able to capture the energies including those of deceased kings as dictated by the use. The elected woman then took the title of Mwadi and came to take up her duties within the royal residence. Then becoming the king himself, she could not marry. The Mwadi institution came to an end in 1970. The hands-on-breasts attitude symbolizes the feminine prerogative of the secrets of "bizila" royalty. Dark satin patina.


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380.00  304.00

Scepter
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Scepter

Featuring a deified ancient king, a figure of a horseman sculpted in the round associated with the sango cult forms the pommel of this ceremonial object. The equine, rare in the region, constituted a prestigious attribute which was reserved for the nobility and the sovereigns. Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà , the Yoruba religion is based on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). They are designed by the sculptors at the request of the followers, soothsayers and their customers. Polychrome patina.
The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name of Nago. They are patrilineal, practice excision and circumcision. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose following the disappearance of ...


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480.00  384.00

Hemba Stick
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Hemba Stick

In African art, headdresses, seats, arms, crowns, cups and drinking horns constitute a set of objects, the regalia, which surround the chiefs and accentuate their authority. Emblem of power and prestige, this fly swatter is surmounted by a singiti ancestor figure.

Dark brown lustrous patina.
The Hemba, established in the south-east of Zaire, on the right bank of the Lualaba, were for a long time subject to the neighboring Luba empire, which had a definite influence on their culture. Ancestor worship, whose effigies have long been attributed to the Luba, is central to Hemba society. All aspects of the community are imbued with the authority of the ancestors. Thus, these are considered to have an influence on justice, medicine, law and sacrifices. The singiti statues were ...


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280.00  224.00

Kwere Staff
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Kwere Staff

Insignia of prestige, this stick bears a female figure, represented seated, sculpted in the round. The ample double crest headdress is typical of the Kwere, like the decorative incisions adorning the handle.
Height on base: 49 cm.
The Zaramo and the tribes surrounding them, such as the Kwéré and the Doé, designed anthropomorphic figures generally associated with fertility, but to which other virtues would be attributed. Their first role is played during the period of confinement of the young initiate Zaramo. The novice will behave towards the object as with a child, and will dance with it during the closing ceremonies of the initiation. In case the young woman does not conceive, she will adopt the "child". Among the Zaramo, this carved motif is repeated on the top of ...


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350.00  280.00

Chokwe Staff
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Chokwe Staff

Les régalia des Tchokwe dans l'art africain
Emblême de pouvoir faisant partie des régalia, marque d'ostentation, ce sceptre représente la puissance politique et symbolique.  Sculpture en ronde-bosse réalisée par un artiste au service du chef, associée au culte thérapeutique de type Hamba, la figure féminine Chokwe ou Lwena incarne l'ancêtre féminin qui est censée garantir les naissances ou la guérison. Le personnage qui illustre également la seconde épouse du chef mythique Chibinda Ilunga arbore une coiffure bombée telle un casque.
Patine brune satinée, résidus de kaolin.
Paisiblement installés en Angola oriental jusqu'au XVIème siècle, les Chokwé ont ensuite été soumis à l'empire lunda dont ils ont hérité un nouveau système hiérarchique et la sacralité du pouvoir. ...


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280.00

Pende stick
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Pende stick

This stick carved with a pattern like the masks of the group is part of the chief's figurative insignia. Glossy black brown patina. 36 cm on base.
The Western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the Eastern settled on the banks of the Kasaï downstream from Tshikapa. The influences of neighboring ethnic groups, Mbla, Suku, Wongo, Leele, Kuba and Salempasu imprinted on their large tribal art sculpture. Within this diversity, the Mbuya masks, realistic, produced every ten years, take on a festive function, and embody different characters, including the chief, the diviner and his wife, the prostitute, the possessed, etc... The masks of initiation and those of power, the minganji, represent the ancestors and occur successively during the same ceremonies, agricultural festivals, ...


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280.00

Sceptre Luba
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Sceptre Luba

Among the emblems of prestige this type of scepter of luba dignitary. He was grounded at inauguration ceremonies and other important rituals. True sources of information about their owners and local history, the sceptres have a varied iconography. The wide part at the top, the dibulu, under the sculpted female figure referring to royalty, represents the administrative centre of each royal capital and bears motifs engraved with parallel lines forming diamonds. These drawings can be found on the mnemonic boards lukasa referring to Luba's political and spiritual history. The cane is divided into several sections engraved with geometric patterns meant to evoke the uninhabited savannahs and roads leading to the kingdom or the chiefdom. Incarnate deceased parents bakishi or spirits bavidye , ...


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Hemba Sceptre
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Hemba Sceptre

Hemba African art.
Like the kibangos of the Luba, this command staff, a prestigious object, refers to the history of the ancestor or that of his clan. The sculpted motif forming the pommel, extended by a ringed neck, represents a singiti ancestor. Dark brown satin patina. Desication erosions and cracks.
The Hemba, established in the south-east of Zaire, on the right bank of the Lualaba, were for a long time subjected to the neighboring Luba empire, which had on their culture, their religion and their art a certain influence. Ancestor worship, whose effigies have long been attributed to the Luba, is central to Hemba society. Genealogy is indeed the guarantor of privileges and the distribution of land. All aspects of the community are imbued with the authority of the ancestors. ...


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280.00  224.00

Kongo Cane
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Kongo Cane

Pommel gebeeldhouwd met een vrouwenfiguur, uitgebreid met een gedeelte in hout en vervolgens metaal.
Glanzend zwarte patina, lichte gebreken en schaafwonden.
Gevestigd op de plateaus van de Volksrepubliek Congo ex. Brazzaville, en niet te verwarren met de Bembe-groep van het noordelijke Tanganinyika-meer, werd de kleine groep Babembé, Béembé, beïnvloed door de Téké-riten en -cultuur, maar vooral door die van de Kongo's. De Béembé, gevestigd in de huidige Republiek Congo, vormden oorspronkelijk het koninkrijk Kongo, met de Vili, Yombé, Bwendé en Woyo. Ze stonden onder de voogdij van koning ntotela, gekozen door de gouverneurs. De handel in ivoor, koper en slaven waren de belangrijkste middelen van deze weinig bekende groep tot de kolonisatie. Het hoofd van het dorp, ...


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280.00  224.00

Teke Flycatcher
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Teke Flycatcher

Object of prestige and parade of the teke chiefs, this fly swatter presents a sculpted miniature "nkumi". The figure is extended by a handle enclosing textile and horsehair.
. Established between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized into chiefdoms whose chief was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu, had the right of life or death over his family whose importance determined his prestige. The chief of the clan, ngantsié , kept the great protective fetish tar mantsié which supervised all the ceremonies. It is the powerful sorcerer healer and diviner who "charged" with magical elements, against payment, the individual statuettes or nkumi . According to the Téké, wisdom was absorbed and stored in the abdomen. It is ...


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Yoruba stick
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Yoruba stick

The Cupbearers in African Art from Nigeria.
The kneeling priestess, her cheeks marked with "kpélé" scarifications, presents a cup intended for offerings or divination. The Yoruba religion is based on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). These spirits are believed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare.
Satin black patina. Desication cracks and abrasions.
Within the Yoruba pantheon, Orunmila is the "orisa" deity who is consulted in the event of a problem through ifà divination thanks to the diviner babalawo (iyanifà for a woman). The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu arose following the disappearance of the Ifé civilization and are still the basis of the political structure of the Yoruba. The Oyo created two cults centered on the Egungun and Sango societies, ...


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280.00  224.00

Kusu Staff
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Kusu Staff

This prestigious staff, among the regalia of chiefs, has different sculpted sections forming an iconographic language relating to the history of the ancestor or that of his clan, such as the kibangos of the Lubas. Strings of pearls are wrapped around the central part, imprisoned in a clay mixture. Orange-brown satin patina. Losses and desication cracks.
The Kusu established on the left bank of the Lualaba have borrowed the artistic traditions of the Luba and the Hemba and have a caste system similar to that Luba . The Kasongos form a Kusu sub-group, now scattered among the Luba, Songye and Hemba. The singiti statues were kept by the fumu mwalo and honored during ceremonies during which sacrifices were offered to them. Alongside the authority of the hereditary chiefs, secret ...


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Sceptre Zela
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Sceptre Zela

Dignitary staff decorated with a handle in the form of a cephalomorphic motif. Glossy patina, small accidents, cracks.
Formerly subject to the Luba, then to the Lundas, the Zela have adopted a large part of their customs and traditions. Established between the Luvua River and Lake Kisalé, they are now organized into four chiefdoms under the supervision of leaders of Luba origin. They venerate a primordial couple frequently represented in statuary, mythical ancestors, and dedicate offerings to the spirits of nature.
Ref. : "Luba" 5 Continents. Roberts; "Kifwebe" F. Neyt, ed. 5Continents.


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280.00  224.00

Kongo Sceptre
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Kongo Sceptre


The Kongos (also known as Bakongos, which is the plural of N'Kongo in Kikongo, live on the Atlantic Ocean coast of Africa Pointe-Noire, (Republic of Congo) until Luanda (Angola) in the South and as far as the province of Bandundu (Democratic Republic of Congo) Superbly crafted, the Kongo command scepters constituted, among the jewels, weapons, recades and statuary, the regalia essential to their status and power. ornaments, pictographs and effigies carved on the sticks evoked proverbs, illustrated the qualities of a chief, told, from section to section, the history of the tribe and insisted on the qualities required to reign. belonging to the royal entourage also benefited from the same coded iconography.
This prestigious emblem comes in the form of an effigy of a chef in a ...


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240.00  192.00

Kongo Sceptre
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Kongo Sceptre

Kongo-type emblem of royal power in the form of an effigy of a chief in a seated position, extended by a handle incised with fine checkered motifs. Satin black patina.
The Kongos (also known as Bakongos, which is the plural of N'Kongo in Kikongo, live on the Atlantic Ocean coast of Africa from Pointe-Noire, (Republic of Congo) to Luanda (Angola ) in the South and as far as the province of Bandundu (Democratic Republic of Congo). Superbly crafted, the Kongo command scepters constituted, among the jewelry, weapons, recades and statuary, the regalia essential to their status and the power of their reign. The ornaments, pictograms and effigies carved on the sticks evoked proverbs, illustrated the qualities of a chief, told, from section to section, the history of the tribe and ...


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240.00  192.00

Yoruba Sceptre
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Yoruba Sceptre

The Oshe of the Yoruba intervene during ritual dances. They are carried in the left hand by the dancers. These figures represent through their double ax headdress, the god of thunder and youth Shango, or Sango, mythical ancestor of the kings of Oyo.
Sango was also the protector of the twins, whose occurrence was very common in the region.
It is a deity feared by its unpredictability. It is venerated because it is supposed to bring beneficial rains to crops. It is also to him that the fertility of women is attributed.

Beautiful lustrous patina, discreetly encrusted with blue pigments. erosions.

Yoruba society is highly organized and has several associations with varying roles. While egbe male society reinforces social norms, the aro unites farmers. ...


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Bwende Stick
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Bwende Stick

In addition to the famous niombo, anthropomorphic funerary "packages" of sometimes giant format, representing the deceased, the Bwende, inspired by the Kongos, produce prestigious traditional sculptures, such as this baton of command surmounted by a Ancestor statuette.
Brilliant nuanced brown patina.

The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembe, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by king ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary endowed with a codified gesture in relation to their vision of the world. The Bwendé sculptures were strongly inspired by those of the neighboring Beembé.


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380.00  304.00

Kongo pestle
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kongo pestle

Old grain pestle whose center is carved with two faces. One of them is represented sticking out his tongue, a gesture with symbolic connotation in rituals against witchcraft. Smooth and glossy honey-coloured patina. Desication cracks.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembe, the Bwende, the Dondo/Kamba, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by King Ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. From comparable beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary endowed with codified gestures in keeping with their vision of the world. Their realistic masks took part in initiation ceremonies and the funerals of notables, and their nailed fetish statues, nkondi, were charged with magical elements ...


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290.00  232.00

Luluwa Staff
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Luluwa Staff

Various prestigious objects were sculpted by the Lulua, such as this dignitary insignia, sculpted with a "bwanga bwa cibola" maternity figure. Tegumentary motifs were marks of beauty with symbolic value, revealing extraordinary physical and moral qualities.
Nuanced brown patina, desiccation cracks.
Lulua is an umbrella term, which refers to a large number of heterogeneous peoples who inhabit the region near the Lulua River, between the Kasai and Sankuru rivers. The Lulua people migrated from West Africa during the 18th century and settled in the southern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire). They produced few masks, but mostly statuettes of ancestors representing the ideal warrior, mulalenga wa nkashaama , as well as the head of the Leopard Society ...


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Yoruba Sceptre
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Yoruba Sceptre

Liturgical objects in African art of the Yoruba
Figure of follower of the god Sango, carried in the left hand during ritual tribal dances, this stick is carved with a kneeling female figure. The physiognomy is characteristic of Yoruba art, illustrated by the large almond-shaped eyes and cheek scarifications. These figures are dedicated to the god of thunder and youth Shango, or Sango, according to the Yoruba religion. The latter would be the mythical ancestor of the kings of Oyo. He was also the protector of the twins, whose occurrence was very frequent in the region. It is a divinity feared for its unpredictability, and revered because it would bring beneficial rains to crops. Women's fertility is also attributed to her.
Satin brown patina, abrasions. Height with ...


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330.00  264.00





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