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African art - Stick of command, chieftaincy:

The batons of command are one of the bases of the tribal herarchy. They are the property of the tribal chief and give him his authority. Often finely carved and always endowed with a patina of use, they are objects that, when plinths, are of the most beautiful effect in an interior.


Guro Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Guro Statue

The spectacular elongation of the bust here forms like a stick supported by curved lower limbs. The head, for its part, refers to the masks of the style qualified as guro-bete for lack of reliable information. The central part, cleared up, would indicate a frequent prehension. Satin garnet black patina.
of the Baoulé. Their respective sculptures, by their morphology, bear witness to their close relationship. Priest and diviner share the predominant ritual functions among the Guro. Secret associations worship the geniuses of nature, through the masks in which the spirits are supposed to reside. Their protective spirits called zuzu were worshiped through statues placed on altars. The Bété form a tribe established on the left bank of the Sassandra River in the south-west of the Ivory ...


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390.00

Hemba Sceptre
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Hemba Sceptre

Hemba African art.
Like the kibangos of the Luba, this command staff, a prestigious object, refers to the history of the ancestor or that of his clan. The sculpted motif forming the pommel, extended by a ringed neck, represents a singiti ancestor. Dark brown satin patina. Desication erosions and cracks.
The Hemba, established in the south-east of Zaire, on the right bank of the Lualaba, were for a long time subjected to the neighboring Luba empire, which had on their culture, their religion and their art a certain influence. Ancestor worship, whose effigies have long been attributed to the Luba, is central to Hemba society. Genealogy is indeed the guarantor of privileges and the distribution of land. All aspects of the community are imbued with the authority of the ancestors. ...


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280.00

Kongo Sceptre
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Kongo Sceptre


The Kongos (also known as Bakongos, which is the plural of N'Kongo in Kikongo, live on the Atlantic Ocean coast of Africa Pointe-Noire, (Republic of Congo) until Luanda (Angola) in the South and as far as the province of Bandundu (Democratic Republic of Congo) Superbly crafted, the Kongo command scepters constituted, among the jewels, weapons, recades and statuary, the regalia essential to their status and power. ornaments, pictographs and effigies carved on the sticks evoked proverbs, illustrated the qualities of a chief, told, from section to section, the history of the tribe and insisted on the qualities required to reign. belonging to the royal entourage also benefited from the same coded iconography.
This prestigious emblem comes in the form of an effigy of a chef in a ...


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240.00

Kongo Sceptre
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Kongo Sceptre

Kongo-type emblem of royal power in the form of an effigy of a chief in a seated position, extended by a handle incised with fine checkered motifs. Satin black patina.
The Kongos (also known as Bakongos, which is the plural of N'Kongo in Kikongo, live on the Atlantic Ocean coast of Africa from Pointe-Noire, (Republic of Congo) to Luanda (Angola ) in the South and as far as the province of Bandundu (Democratic Republic of Congo). Superbly crafted, the Kongo command scepters constituted, among the jewelry, weapons, recades and statuary, the regalia essential to their status and the power of their reign. The ornaments, pictograms and effigies carved on the sticks evoked proverbs, illustrated the qualities of a chief, told, from section to section, the history of the tribe and ...


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240.00

Yoruba Sceptre
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Yoruba Sceptre

The Oshe of the Yoruba intervene during ritual dances. They are carried in the left hand by the dancers. These figures represent through their double ax headdress, the god of thunder and youth Shango, or Sango, mythical ancestor of the kings of Oyo.
Sango was also the protector of the twins, whose occurrence was very common in the region.
It is a deity feared by its unpredictability. It is venerated because it is supposed to bring beneficial rains to crops. It is also to him that the fertility of women is attributed.

Beautiful lustrous patina, discreetly encrusted with blue pigments. erosions.

Yoruba society is highly organized and has several associations with varying roles. While egbe male society reinforces social norms, the aro unites farmers. ...


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Teke Flycatcher
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Teke Flycatcher

Object of prestige and parade of the teke chiefs, this fly swatter presents a sculpted miniature "nkumi". The figure is extended by a handle enclosing textile and horsehair.
. Established between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized into chiefdoms whose chief was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu, had the right of life or death over his family whose importance determined his prestige. The chief of the clan, ngantsié , kept the great protective fetish tar mantsié which supervised all the ceremonies. It is the powerful sorcerer healer and diviner who "charged" with magical elements, against payment, the individual statuettes or nkumi . According to the Téké, wisdom was absorbed and stored in the abdomen. It is ...


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340.00

Bwende Stick
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Bwende Stick

In addition to the famous niombo, anthropomorphic funerary "packages" of sometimes giant format, representing the deceased, the Bwende, inspired by the Kongos, produce prestigious traditional sculptures, such as this baton of command surmounted by a Ancestor statuette.
Brilliant nuanced brown patina.

The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembe, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by king ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary endowed with a codified gesture in relation to their vision of the world. The Bwendé sculptures were strongly inspired by those of the neighboring Beembé.


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380.00

Kongo pestle
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Kongo pestle

Old grain pestle whose center is carved with two faces. One of them is represented sticking out his tongue, a gesture with symbolic connotation in rituals against witchcraft. Smooth and glossy honey-coloured patina. Desication cracks.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembe, the Bwende, the Dondo/Kamba, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by King Ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. From comparable beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary endowed with codified gestures in keeping with their vision of the world. Their realistic masks took part in initiation ceremonies and the funerals of notables, and their nailed fetish statues, nkondi, were charged with magical elements ...


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290.00

Luluwa Staff
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Luluwa Staff

Various prestigious objects were sculpted by the Lulua, such as this dignitary insignia, sculpted with a "bwanga bwa cibola" maternity figure. Tegumentary motifs were marks of beauty with symbolic value, revealing extraordinary physical and moral qualities.
Nuanced brown patina, desiccation cracks.
Lulua is an umbrella term, which refers to a large number of heterogeneous peoples who inhabit the region near the Lulua River, between the Kasai and Sankuru rivers. The Lulua people migrated from West Africa during the 18th century and settled in the southern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire). They produced few masks, but mostly statuettes of ancestors representing the ideal warrior, mulalenga wa nkashaama , as well as the head of the Leopard Society ...


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Yoruba Sceptre
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Yoruba Sceptre

Liturgical objects in African art of the Yoruba
Figure of follower of the god Sango, carried in the left hand during ritual tribal dances, this stick is carved with a kneeling female figure. The physiognomy is characteristic of Yoruba art, illustrated by the large almond-shaped eyes and cheek scarifications. These figures are dedicated to the god of thunder and youth Shango, or Sango, according to the Yoruba religion. The latter would be the mythical ancestor of the kings of Oyo. He was also the protector of the twins, whose occurrence was very frequent in the region. It is a divinity feared for its unpredictability, and revered because it would bring beneficial rains to crops. Women's fertility is also attributed to her.
Satin brown patina, abrasions. Height with ...


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330.00

Baluba Sceptre
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Baluba Sceptre

This object of African art, from a private Antwerp collection, is formed of a rectangular flat, extended by a stick engraved in its upper part of parallel lines arranged in triangles, and then a female figure in round-bump. The character is endowed, limited by a checkered headband, with a braided hairstyle called "en cascade", like the Luba women's headdresses in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, as evidenced by the photographs taken at the time. Large hollowed-out eye sockets shelter stretched and closed eyelids, and a small mouth appears in a prognathic chin. The protruding of the abdomen is highlighted by the position of digitized hands, the realistic figuration of sexual organs further accentuating the reference to motherhood and fertility. The buttocks also have protrusions, ...


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195.00

Dogon Staff
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Dogon Staff

The prestigious domolo crosier worn by Dogon men on their shoulders and sometimes found on altars and in binu sanctuaries recalls the insignia of the yona association. , the Yo domolo , or even Yo dyommodo , which forms the emblem of the "ritual thieves". These hoe-shaped emblems evoke a horse's head, the primordial animal of creation. Ritual patina, residual encrustations. Desication cracks.
The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, their esotericism, their myths and legends. Their population is estimated at around 300,000 souls living in the southwest of the Niger bend in the Mopti region of Mali. The Dogon blacksmiths form an endogamous caste called irim They now produce weapons, tools, and also work with wood.
"Masters of fire", they are also supposed to ...


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260.00

Fang staff
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Fang staff

Fang-type prestige scepter, offering an anthropomorphic figure associated with the worship of the ancestors of the Byeri. Sculpted with skill, the piece features a young woman with a long bust framed by bent arms whose hands rest under her breasts. The curved legs rise, semi-flexed, from a rounded base that extends the handle. The face is shaped like a heart in the center of a spherical head.
Shiny patina, cracks.
Among the Fang, the relics of the most remarkable ancestors were kept in cylindrical bark boxes near the couch of the head of the lineage, initiate of the family cult of Byéri. Surmounted by a human effigy which affirmed their identity, they contributed to the protection of their descendants. The initiation rites, forbidden to women and children, took place under ...


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Kongo stick
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Kongo stick

Tribal statuette fitted with an abdominal cavity to receive a magical charge. The charge or bilongo consisted of various ingredients from the natural environment including red clay, red wood powder tukula, white clay pembe... , but possibly human fragments such as teeth, nails, hair. This fetish of conspiracy was supposed to influence the health, prosperity, enemies of its holder. The headdress is characteristic of the statuary Béembé and Yombé, other tribes of the group Kongo.Patine golden mahogany.
Chez the Kongo, the specialist named nganga , was in charge of the rituals by activating a spiritual force with a nkondi (pl. nkissi). The term nkisi was then used to refer to the terms 'sacred' or 'divine' These protective fetishes for homes are among the most popular in Africa. The ...


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Luba sceptre
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Luba sceptre

This type of emblem of power incorporated the regalia of dignitaries as they traveled. True sources of information on their owners and local history, the scepters display a varied iconography. The wide part at the top, the dibulu, bears engraved patterns of parallel lines forming diamonds. These drawings are found on the mnemonic boards lukasa referring to Luba political and spiritual history.
In order to reinforce the royal symbolism, a feminine figurative motif, sculpted in the round, symbolizes the female mediumistic capacities. The attitude, hands on breasts, indicates that the secrets of Luba royalty (the bizila) belong to women thanks to their role as political and spiritual intermediaries.
Semi-gloss two-tone patina, desiccation cracks, erosions.
Ref. : ...


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Yoruba Staff
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Yoruba Staff

Objects of prestige in African art associated with the Yoruba culture. Among the Yoruba, ritual sculptures are dedicated to the mythical gods "orisa" and supposed to attract their blessings. This stick is made up of different sections: a superposition of human figures topped by a snake and a carved motif probably associated with fertility. Among the Yoruba, the snake also symbolizes masculinity. Piece collected in Gouka, Benin. Red brown oiled patina. Missing.
Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, the Yoruba religion is indeed based on artistic sculptures with coded messages ( aroko ). They are designed by sculptors at the request of adepts, diviners and their clients. These spirits are supposed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare . The ...


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Hemba stick
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Hemba stick

Stick carved with a motif in the round depicting a forefather singiti . Dark brown satin patina.

The Hemba, established in southeastern Zaire on the right bank of the Lualaba River, were for a long time subject to the neighboring Luba empire, which had a definite influence on their culture, religion and art. Ancestor worship, whose effigies have long been attributed to the Luba, is central to hemba society. Genealogy is indeed the guarantor of privileges and land distribution. All aspects of the community are permeated by the authority of the ancestors. Thus, they are considered to have influence over justice, medicine, law, and sacrifice. The singiti statues were kept by the fumu mwalo and honored in ceremonies during which sacrifices were offered to them. ...


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290.00

Yoruba Sceptre
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Yoruba Sceptre

Brandished in the left hand during ritual dances, this staff sculpted with the figure of a follower of the god Sango is surmounted by a stylized motif associated with the double stone ax that the god would hurl to earth during storms. The physiognomy is characteristic of Yoruba art, illustrated by the large almond-shaped eyes and the cheek scarifications. These sculptures refer to the god of thunder and youth Shango, or Sango. The latter would be the mythical ancestor of the kings of Oyo. He was also the protector of the twins, whose occurrence was very common in the region.
It is a deity feared for its unpredictability, and venerated because it would bring beneficial rains to crops. It is also to her that the fertility of women is attributed.

Abraded black ...


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380.00

Kongo Yombe Pfemba Flycatcher
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African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Yombe Stick

A maternity figure pfemba , carved in the round, forms the handle of this prestigious flycatcher. The woman seated cross-legged, named phemba or pfemba, a symbol of the mythical ancestor, is likely associated with fertility cults. The child on her lap would embody the matrilineal transmission of power. Different faces adorn the middle section of the handle, while decorative motis are printed around the lower part. Lustrous black patina. The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombe were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom from which they borrowed naturalistic statuary and religious rituals by means of carved fetishes nkondo nkisi.
The Yombe are established on the West African coast in the southwestern Republic of the Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable ...

Stick with Pfemba Yombe pattern
African art > Stick of command, chieftaincy > Yombe Stick

Of Pfemba inspiration, the female effigy at the top embodies the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure, as evidenced by the rhombic scarifications of the bust. The Yombe indeed decorated their textiles, mats and loincloths, with this type of rhombic motifs in relation to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The open mouth exhibits traditionally filed teeth, and the wide eyes emphasize the foremother's ability to perceive the beyond, to discern hidden things. This type of statuette phemba , pfemba ,also adorned the top of prestige canes, mwala .
Satin patina.
Belonging to the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the West African coast, in the southwestern Republic of the Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternities. Among the ...


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290.00

Scepter Tchokwe
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African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Scepter Tchokwe

Tshokwe Chiefdoms and African Art

Intended to exalt the qualities of the leader, mark of ostentation, this scepter represents the political and symbolic power, by a sculpture in round-bump which represents Chibinda Ilunga naked and in seated position, hunter and mythical hero, founder of the Chokwe ethnic group . Easily recognizable by his wide cap with curved lateral wings (cipenya-mutwe), he had taught his people the art of hunting. The chiefs had a major function in the rites of propitiation for the hunting and fertility of women, the objects being adorned with this figure having, therefore, a protective function. Peacefully settled in eastern Angola until the 16th century, the Chokwe were then subjected to the lunda empire from which they inherited a new hierarchical ...


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