The african art expertise

From african mask to statue or bronze, the first advantage, and the most important, is the certainty to buy on our website authentic and quality african artifact. Every item of our african art gallery is expertised by an expert in african art before going for sale, wich assures you a high quality purchase. Some of our african art collection items have also been aquired by famous museums.

The african art expertise

From african mask to statue or bronze, the first advantage, and the most important, is the certainty to buy on our website authentic and quality african artifact. Every item of our african art gallery is expertised by an expert in african art before going for sale, wich assures you a high quality purchase. Some of our african art collection items have also been aquired by famous museums.

The price

A quick look at our site will show you that we propose the best prices in the african art. This is possible thanks to the fact that we have been pionneers in selling african art artifacts online, we have optimised our logistic to reduce our operationnal costs. This directly benefits to our clients.

Our african art gallery

Active on internet since 1999, we are also a physical african art gallery, do not hesitate to visit us, from monday to saturday 10AM to 6PM, and sunday only on appointment, at 73 Rue de Tournai 7333 Tertre en Belgique.
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You are antique dealer,gallerist or decorator, do not hesitate to contact us.
You want to sell your african art items ? We buy african art collections

Last african art items added to our catalog

Yoruba Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba Statuette

Cup bearers in classical African art from Nigeria.
The priestess, her cheeks marked with scarifications in three vertical “kpele” claws, presents a lidded cup intended for offerings or divination. Body marks could be permanent or temporary, such as tattoos made from insect or plant juices, particularly for court dignitaries or the king himself. The Yoruba religion is based on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). These spirits are believed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare.
Satin patina. Break on the base.
Offering cups, some of which were used to hold kola nuts or other gifts for visitors, were once placed in royal palaces in the Ekiti and Igbomina regions of Yorubaland.


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180.00

Montol Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Montol Statuette

Disturbing by the expression of its face, this rare figurative statuette could have been sculpted by the Montol or Boki groups. The stiffened posture of the body contributes to the dynamics of the cry. Satin black patina.
It was during healing rites, or even divination of the origins of illnesses, that this sculpture played a major role for members of male komtin society. The Montol kept the sculptures for community use in the "dodos", thatched-roof huts decorated with trophy skulls, where they were used in worship following ritual libations. Works of this type come from the neighboring Angas of Montol on the Jos plateau.


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240.00

Chokwe Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Chokwe Mask

Belgian collection of African art. Always worn by higher-ranking initiates, this type of African mask embodying a female ancestor was often decorated with buttons and accessories of European origin. Satin brown patina. Slight chips, old restoration of one ear.
Height on base: 51 cm.

In eastern Angola, African Chokwe pwo masks, among the numerous akishi masks (sing: mukishi, indicating power) of African Chokwe art, embody an ideal of beauty, Mwana Pwo, or the Pwo woman and appear today during festive ceremonies. Joined to their male counterparts, chihongo recognizable by their large tray-shaped headdress, the pwo are supposed to bring fertility and prosperity to the community. The cultural logic of these two icons developed during the pre-colonial period still ...


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190.00

Chokwe Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Chokwe Mask

The Tschokwe, in African art, have a male association, the mukanda, which uses around thirty masks linked to the ancestors, for social purposes varied, including this type of animal mask, the ngulu. Colorful cotton fabrics and various small objects were also added. The lewd behavior that accompanied his exhibition contrasted with the other masked dances.
Locally grainy brown patina. Abrasions. Height on base: 42 cm.

The Tschokwe, of Bantu culture, had established themselves in eastern Angola, but also in the Congo and Zambia. Following different alliances, they mixed with the Lunda who taught them hunting.
Sources: “Chokwe”, 5continents, B.Wastiau and “African Art”, Mazenod.


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380.00

Yoruba Maternity
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Yoruba Maternity

African motherhood naturalist of the Yoruba type. Communication with the afterlife was based on a maternal figure embodying for the Yoruba people one of the many female goddesses, the earth goddess Onilé ("owner of the House"), guarantor of longevity, peace, and resources, and linked to the powerful Ogboni society among theYoruba Egba and Ijebu. She could also embody Orunmila, goddess of divination.
Smooth mahogany patina, erosions and drying cracks.
Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, the Yoruba religion is based on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the disappearance of the Ifé civilization and are still the basis of the political structure of the Yoruba . The Oyo created two cults centered on the ...


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380.00

Baule Statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Baule Statue

Belgian collection of African art
“Waka-Sona” (“wooden being” in Baoulé) sculpture which presents slender and graceful shapes. It represents a naked figure with an oblong head emerging from a long neck. The face with feminine features, with large protruding eyes, is topped by a braided hairstyle in the shape of a diadem. Without accessories to distract, the purity of the forms is highlighted. The character's two hands rest on a swollen abdomen, symbolizing filiation. Despite a long drying crack on the bust, the sculpture retains a satin black patina, dotted with kaolin residue.
The Baoulés produce two types of "Waka-Sona" statues for specific rituals: those which evoke an "assiè oussou" (being of the earth), part of a set used as a medium by Komian diviners, selected by the ...


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370.00

Lega mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Lega mask

Bwami lega mask, perhaps animal because of its elongated structure, tightened at the level of the jaw treated as a rectangle. The cross patterns would symbolize a mane or coat. These masks indicated the stage that its holder had reached within the Bwami, a learning society made up of different grades, and joined by wives whose spouses had reached the third level, that of ngandu.
Golden beige patina.


Within the Lega, the Bwami society open to men and women, organized social and political life. There were up to seven levels of initiation, each associated with emblems. Following their exodus from Uganda during the 17th century, the Lega settled on the west bank of the Lualaba River in the DRC. The role of chief, kindi, is held by the oldest man in the clan, who must ...


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170.00

Lega Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Lega Mask

African masks Lega. This type of lega mask indicated the stage that its holder had reached within the Bwami. His double gaze evokes spiritual vision. Smooth brown patina, cracks concentrated at the top, erosions. Height on base: 49 cm.
Within the Léga, the society of Bwami open to men and women, organized social and political life. There were up to seven levels of initiation, each associated with emblems. Following their exodus from Uganda during the 17th century, the Lega settled on the west bank of the Lualaba River in the DRC. Social recognition and authority also had to be earned individually: the leader owed his selection to his heart (mutima), good character, intelligence, and impeccable behavior. During ritual ceremonies, the Idumu masks were presented to the ...


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170.00

 Leka Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Leka Mask

Ex. Belgian collection of African art.
African mask of initiation of the Lega or even the Leka, whose society, the Bukota, welcoming both men and women, is the equivalent of the Bwami association of the Lega. Their masks are quite similar, but are distinguished by their mouth and sometimes also their square or rectangular eyes.br>
Black glossy patina encrusted with white clay.
Height on base: 33 cm.
The sculptures of the Leka, subject to the influence of the neighboring Mbole, Lega and Binja, played a role during initiation, funeral or circumcision ceremonies, and were then placed on the tomb of high-ranking initiates. Each of these figures had a name and a meaning with an educational purpose, like the Lega traditions.


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170.00

Songye Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Songye Mask

The tribal masks of the Songye.
African mask of the Songye, established in the south of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Featuring an impressive sagittal crest, this majestic kilume mask, whose narrow cheeks propel the features, embodies high authority in the brotherhood. Striated flat areas highlight the volumes. Matt patina, erosions and desiccation cracks.
Height on base: 81 cm.
Three variants of this Kifwebe mask (pl. Bifwebe) or "chasing out death" (Roberts) are distinguished: the masculine (kilume) generally with a high crest, the feminine (kikashi) with a very bass or absent, and finally the greatest embodying power (kia ndoshi). This type of mask, still used today, is worn with a long costume and a long beard made of natural fibers, absent on this ...


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240.00

Songye Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Songye Mask

Private collection of a Belgian gallery owner whose identity will be communicated to the buyer.

African art among the Songye is distinguished in particular by the Kifwebe masks, also known by the plural Bifwebe, which were produced at the same time by the Luba and the Songye. The term Kifwebe designates both the mask itself, the society of masks and the mask wearer belonging to the male secret society bwadi bwa kifwebe, responsible for social control. These masks come in three variants: the masculine (kilume), generally decorated with a high crest, the feminine (kikashi) with a very low or even absent crest, and finally the largest symbolizing power (kia ndoshi).
Equipped with holes on their outline, these African masks allow you to attach a costume during the most ...


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240.00

Kongo Box
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Kongo Box

Ex-Belgian collection of African art.
Small pear-shaped container with a cap, intended to contain powder for wooden rifles. This black powder was imported from Europe, making it a luxurious commodity carefully preserved. This powder, to which magical virtues were also attributed, often complemented the ingredients of ritual fetishes. Decorative motifs are engraved on the sides of the object. Matte brown patina.
The Solongo cultures of Angola and Yombé were largely influenced by the Kongo kingdom from which they borrowed the naturalist statuary and religious rites, in particularly by means of carved fetishes nkondo nkisi.

Ref. : “Maternity in black African art” Massa; “Tribal Art of Black Africa” Bacquart.


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70.00

Tikar currency
African art > Black iron objects, black iron masks > Tikar currency

French collection of tribal art.
According to R. Ballarini in "The Perfect Form" (p.182), this primitive African currency is associated with the prestige of Tikar chiefs. A sort of bowl with a long handle, it also has a chain extended by a spatula-shaped blade. Grainy brown-black patina.
The Tikar populate the western part of central Cameroon which is located within the dense secondary forest of medium altitude, along the Mbam. These black iron blades were used as currency but also for offerings, wedding dowries and for major festive and ceremonial occasions. "Before the colonial era, payments in Africa were never made using coins. Transactions were made using products considered valuable because they were rare, useful, or desirable: livestock, pieces of fabric , pearls, cowrie ...


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180.00

Ewe statue
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ewe statue

Anthromoporphe bust, eroded, cracked surface, old patina rubbed with ocher. Function undetermined.
In Togo, African fetishes are part of rituals following the intentions of their owner. Witch doctors, following the fa divination ritual using palm nuts, make them to order to offer protective and medicinal virtues but also offer more classic ready-to-use versions. The Ewe, often confused with the Minas, are the largest ethnic group in Togo. They are also found as minorities in Ghana, Benin, Ivory Coast and Nigeria. According to Hélène Joubert, the cults paid to the Yoruba gods, the orisha, and those of the Vodou gods, vodun, as well as their religious structure, are comparable in many respects. Slaves from different cultures further exported their practices to Cuba and Brazil. ...


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240.00

Pende whistle
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Pende whistle

This type of talisman object, worn as a pendant, was used during collective hunts, in order to alert one's team or dog to direct the prey towards a goal. The whistling sound was modulated using the lateral appendage. The success of the hunts was in fact ensured by specialists thanks to a wide diversity of ritual objects. The motif is the Kiwoyo mask among the Eastern Pende, or Giwoyo among those from the Center, which was generally worn as a cap over a soft hat. Originally associated with the deceased lying on his bed, this mask was associated with funeral rituals. Nowadays he participates in peaceful and festive ceremonies
Matte brown patina.
Height on base: 20 cm.
The Western Pende live on the banks of the Kwilu, while the Eastern have established themselves on the ...


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180.00

Tchokwe Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Tchokwe Mask

Ex-French African art collection.
The African Chokwe pwo masks, in African tribal art, are exclusively female representations, intended for the worship of female ancestors. Indeed, the chokwe society is organized in a matrilineal way. Joined to their male counterparts, cihongo recognizable by their large headdress in the shape of a tray, pwo face masks must bring fertility and prosperity to the community. The cultural logic of these two icons developed during the pre-colonial period continues to inspire artists in north-eastern Angola.

Characteristic patterns on the forehead, and sometimes on the cheekbones, are part of the chokwe aesthetic canons but also served as public markers of ethnic identity. This recurrent cruciform frontal pattern would also have a cosmogonic ...


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380.00

Lega Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Lega Mask

African mask used among the Lega during the initiation rites of the Bwami society. The latter is open to men and women.
The passage of a grade indicated the acquisition of a certain wisdom and individual morality.
Two-tone matte patina, erosions.
Height on base: 56 cm.
Within the Léga, the society of Bwami open to men and women, organized social and political life. There were up to seven levels of initiation, each associated with emblems. Following their exodus from Uganda during the 17th century, the Lega settled on the west bank of the Lualaba River in the DRC. Also called Warega, these individuals live in autonomous villages surrounded by palisades, generally on hilltops. The role of leader, kindi, is held by the oldest man in the clan, who must be the highest ...


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150.00

Tabwa Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Tabwa Statuette

Masculine statuette bearing the traditional checkerboard scarifications of the clan. Satin orange patina. Slight drying cracks.
The Tabwa ("scarify" and "write") constitute an ethnic group present in the South-East of the DRC, around Lake Tanganyika. The tribes of this region, such as the Tumbwe, worship their mipasi ancestors thanks to sculptures held by the elders. Simple farmers without centralized power, the Tabwa united around tribal chiefs after having been influenced by the Luba. It was mainly during this period that their artistic movement was expressed mainly through statues but also masks. The Tabwa practiced ancestor worship and dedicated some of their statues to it.


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240.00



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