The african art expertise

From african mask to statue or bronze, the first advantage, and the most important, is the certainty to buy on our website authentic and quality african artifact. Every item of our african art gallery is expertised by an expert in african art before going for sale, wich assures you a high quality purchase. Some of our african art collection items have also been aquired by famous museums.

The african art expertise

From african mask to statue or bronze, the first advantage, and the most important, is the certainty to buy on our website authentic and quality african artifact. Every item of our african art gallery is expertised by an expert in african art before going for sale, wich assures you a high quality purchase. Some of our african art collection items have also been aquired by famous museums.

The price

A quick look at our site will show you that we propose the best prices in the african art. This is possible thanks to the fact that we have been pionneers in selling african art artifacts online, we have optimised our logistic to reduce our operationnal costs. This directly benefits to our clients.

Our african art gallery

Active on internet since 1999, we are also a physical african art gallery, do not hesitate to visit us, from monday to saturday 10AM to 6PM, and sunday only on appointment, at 73 Rue de Tournai 7333 Tertre en Belgique.
You can also reach us by phone +32 (0)65.529.100

You are antique dealer,gallerist or decorator, do not hesitate to contact us.
You want to sell your african art items ? We buy african art collections

Last african art items added to our catalog

Bamoun Necklace
African art > Jewelry, ornament > Bamoun Necklace

The African art of the Bamoun, and the regalia associated with sovereignty. This Bamoun dignitary necklace, or even Bamoum, is garnished with 12 heads arranged on a metal hoop. This iconography symbolizes royalty. When they sit, the members of the court council of Sultan Bamoun wear this distinctive adornment of their function, the mbangba, "mgba-mgba", which contributes according to them to strengthen their prestige and ward off any evil power. Among the Bamoun, it is the fon, the head of the Kingdom or the chiefdom, who will offer this necklace to deserving men.


The Bamoun live in a region full of wooded terrain but also savannahs. This large territory called Grassland located in the southwest of Cameroon is also the seat of other close ethnic groups such as the ...


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380.00

Yoruba Maternity
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Yoruba Maternity

Intended to sit on an altar, this motherhood presenting an offering cup is represented standing, unlike the majority of Yoruba female figures. Resinous ritual patina, desiccation crack (headdress). Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, the Yoruba religion is based on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the disappearance of the Ifé civilization and are still the basis of the political structure of the Yoruba . The Oyo created two cults centered on the Egungun and Sango societies, still active, which worship their gods, the Orisa, through ceremonies making call for masks, statuettes, scepters and divination supports. The slave trade helped spread Yoruba beliefs across continents.


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240.00

Ndengese Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ndengese Statuette

A people from Central Africa established in Kasai, neighboring the Kuba, the Ndengese form one of the clans descended from a common Mongo ancestor, some of them originating of the Upper Nile. They produced primitive art statues with absent or truncated lower limbs, covered with graphic symbols, symbolizing the prestige of the leader. The flared hairstyle topped with a summit horn (truncated here) is characteristic of the hairstyles acquired by the Totshi chiefs belonging to the ikoho association and evokes particular proverbs. It symbolizes respect, intelligence and maturity. The scarified patterns traced on the bust aim to differentiate socially and aesthetically. Satin brown patina, drying cracks.
Ref.: “Treasures of Africa” Tervuren Museum.


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180.00

Lega Cap
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Lega Cap

This type of headdress is worn by members of the highest ranks of the bwami secret society, governing the lega social structure, open to circumcised adults and their wives and who instruct their adherents in terms of moral perfection. These objects are part of the masengo, meaning that they are sacred and can therefore only be worn by initiates. The owner cannot part with it during his lifetime. Bwami has different degrees, with yananio and kindi being the highest. The materials used vary, it can be buttons of clothes, cowries, pearls or cocoa beans. On a carefully braided natural fiber cap, this headgear is entirely covered with manufactured buttons (Mukuba). This old skullcap is originally surmounted by elephant hair in reference, under an imperturbable appearance, to the destructive ...


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150.00

Lega Cap
African art > Headdresses and hats, headdresses > Lega Cap

This type of head ornament is intended for members of the upper echelons of the bwami secret society, governing the lega social structure. This society, which instructs its members in terms of moral perfection, is open to circumcised adults and their wives. These prestigious headdresses are part of the masengo, meaning that they are sacred and can therefore only be worn by initiates. The owner cannot part with it during his lifetime. Bwami has different degrees, with yananio and kindi being the highest. The materials used vary, they can be clothing buttons, cowrie shells, pearls or cocoa beans. Cowrie shells, an ancient currency in Africa, line a cap carefully woven from natural fibers. This type of headgear was originally topped with elephant hair in reference to the destructive power ...


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150.00

Kongo figure
African art > Maternity, statues, bronze, wood > Kongo figure

Among the regalia of the chiefs, this type of African Kongo maternity embodies, according to the scarifications of the bust, the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure. The child would embody the matrilineal transmission of power.
The Yombe adorned their textiles, mats and loincloths, with lozenges related to proverbs glorifying work and social unity. The mouth reveals filed teeth, the gaze indicates the grandmother's ability to discern occult things. The use of this type of sculpture remains unknown. They frequently formed the carved pattern at the top of chiefs' canes. Satin patina. Cracks, erosions.
A clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes ...


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160.00

Kongo figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kongo figure

Small statuette carved in the Kongo style, associated with the ancestor of the clan, a mediating figure. The child would embody the matrilineal transmission of power. These effigies frequently formed the carved pattern atop chiefs' canes. Glossy dark brown patina.
Desication crack. A clan of the Kongo group, the Yombe are established on the west coast of Africa, in the south-west of the Republic of Congo and in Angola. Their statuary includes remarkable maternities. The use of this type of sculpture remains unknown. Among the Kongo , the nganga was responsible for the rituals by activating a spiritual force with an nkondi (pl. nkissi). The term nkisi was then used to designate the notions of "sacred" or "divine". The most influential category of "minkisi kongo" consisted of ...


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160.00

Kongo Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kongo Statuette

Kongo ancestor figure, frozen in a posture specific to the clan. Black patina with a satin feel. Cracks.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, led by the ntotela king. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary with codified gestures in relation to their vision of the world. The nganga sorcerers, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God called Nzambi through these consecrated figures. Aggressive kindoki witchcraft is the absolute evil that must be fought. To this end, nkisis protective figures are made and charged by the nganga with all the ...


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160.00

Dogon bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon bronze

Small anecdotal statuette describing a character carrying an ax and a bundle of wood. This statuette with many details is coated with a black patina encrusted with clear deposits.
Dogon blacksmiths form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim. They now produce weapons, tools, and also work with wood. "Masters of fire" associated in the Dogon cosmogony with the primordial beings "Nommo" created by the god Ama, they are also supposed to heal burns. Small metal objects, made using the lost-wax technique, were widespread in the Inner Niger Delta region, with copper reaching it through trans-Saharan trade. Excavations on the Bandiagara plateau have in fact brought to light vestiges of iron and steel sites prior to the 15th century, the date of the arrival of the Dogon. The ...


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99.00

Idoma Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Idoma Mask

Two faces carried by a long neck are topped with tubular excrescences. Checkerboard scarifications decorate the faces. Holes at the base allowed the addition of raffia fibers. This dense wooden crest was used in dry season funeral ceremonies and festivities in the Cross River region.
Crusty patina, locally chipped. Cracks.
The Idoma inhabit the confluence of the Benue and Niger rivers. Numbering 500,000, they are farmers and traders. The influence of their Igbo neighbors, the Cross River and Igala ethnic groups have generated great similarities and stylistic borrowings. The royal lineage members of their oglinye society, glorifying courage, use very diverse masks and crests, during funerals and festivities. Some of them could not be seen, on pain of death. They also ...


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290.00

Igbo Mask
African art > African mask, tribal art, primitive art > Igbo Mask

Related to the spirit of an Igbo girl, but worn by young men during harvest festivals or celebrations associated with the spirit of the earth, this African mask takes up Igbo conventions glorifying the beauty of youth, face coated in white, tattoos and scarified motifs, capillary superstructure in crest with which different sculpted subjects are mixed. Matte patina with discreet polychrome highlights, erosions, desiccation cracks.
The Igbo live in the forest in the southeast of Nigeria. They managed to combine a deep sense of individuality with an equally strong sense of group belonging. Their political system is complex and little known. The village constitutes the largest social unit, the smallest being the extended family. Each village has a high degree of autonomy and is ...


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480.00

Songye Fetish
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Songye Fetish

African fetish statuette of the Songye whose specificity lies in the posture, the ample headdress, and the umbilical capsule marked with a cowrie shell. Black patina inlaid with ocher. Lacks.
The Songye fetish, magical sculpture Nkisi , nkishi (pl. mankishi), plays the role of mediator between gods and men. In the 16th century, the Songyes migrated from the Shaba region to settle in Kasai, Katanga and South Kivu. Their history is inseparable from that of the Luba to whom they are related through common ancestors. Very present in their society, divination made it possible to discover sorcerers and to shed light on the causes of the misfortunes which struck individuals.
Lit. : "The Sensitive and the Force" ed. Royal Museum for Central Africa


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180.00

Sao Bronze
African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Sao Bronze

Miniature in bronze alloy depicting a rider on his mount, the latter representing an exceptional attribute of prestige in the arid regions of the Sahel. This talisman constitutes, for the Sao, a protection against madness. The rider symbolizes the genius who possesses the madman, the horse representing the victim.
Between the 12th and 14th centuries, the Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established on hills in the border regions of Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria, in order to repel invaders. Subjected to successive attacks from their neighbors in Kanem and then to hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the North-West of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to the Kotokos. The Kotoko still attribute today to the copper ...


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40.00

Koma Statuette
African art > Terracotta, jar, amphora, funerary urn > Koma Statuette

Fragment of an anthropomorphic funerary figure in terracotta, of the type found during multiple excavations from 1985, in the far north of Ghana on the border of Burkina-Faso. These small sculptures, made from a mixture of clay and grainy sand, were named by local farmers "kronkronbali", which means children of yesteryear. It has been established through scientific investigations that these objects were created between the 13th and 19th centuries. They are renowned for their representation of entire characters but also for simple small heads. The lines are simple and the shapes are soft and rounded.


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250.00

Gouro Pulley
African art > Used objects, pulleys, boxes, loom, awale > Gouro Pulley

In Côte d'Ivoire, the most ordinary objects had to meet aesthetic criteria. Furniture, ornaments, utensils, fabrics, are the pretext for refined artistic expression on the part of artisans and sculptors. The latter, mainly farmers, carry out this activity in addition. Some of them also produce pieces for neighboring ethnic groups. Creative talent, however, remains linked to the occult power of the craftsman, to the ritual requirements surrounding woodworking.
Head pulley decorated with a human figure. Its black-brown satin patina, abrasions.


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180.00

Kumu Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Kumu Statuette

African sculpture which could be used during ritual ceremonies or indicate, placed in front of the huts, the progress of an initiation. Different therapeutic associations exist among the Kumu: Ntema, Lumba, Kilanga, Nsubi,... These ceremonies could be accompanied by divinatory sessions supported by the taking of hallucinogens. Polychrome grainy patina.
The Kumu, Bakumu, Komo, live mainly in the North-East and the center in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Their Bantu language is komo or kikomo. Several ethnic groups are closely intertwined, with similar associations: the Mbole, the Yela, the Lengola, and the Metoko. Their artistic production also presents great similarities with that of the Metoko and Lengola. It is in fact in the Maniema region around the Lualaba River and the ...


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380.00

Teke Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Teke Statuette

Belgian collection ofAfrican artBelgian.
The Teke and their Mfinu neighbors have very diverse African sculptures, often loaded with fetish materials, in an attempt to promote hunting, cure illnesses, facilitate childbirth, etc... This ancient statuette , associated with the butti ancestors, is depicted without scarifications, and its gestures refer to filiation and fertility. Glossy honey-colored patina. Desiccation cracks. Restoration and shine on one foot.
Established between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, the Téké were organized into chiefdoms whose leader was often chosen from among the blacksmiths. The head of the family, mfumu , had the right of life or death over his family, the importance of which determined his prestige. The head of the clan, ...


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290.00

Ganda milk pot
African art > Jars, amphoras, pots, matakam > Ganda milk pot

Decorated with a frieze of parallel grooves and diamonds, this ancient container from East Africa was designed by a nomadic people. The latter was particularly decimated by the Islamic slave trade and by recurrent infighting. Population groups called "Bantous interlacustres", located between Lake Victoria and the Limpopo River, include the Ganda , Nyoro, Nkole, Soga, Toro, Hima, and the Tutsi of Rwanda and Burundi. Their cultures have similarities, as do their artistic production and their everyday objects.
Apart from the prestigious vases created by the potter in the service of the king, named kujona , The Ganda of Uganda also produce containers for everyday use, such as this object patinated by use and equipped with a woven lid. Desication crack.


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250.00



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