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African art - Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba :

The riders are generally made of bronze, but many of them are made of wood. True masterpieces of Dogon, Sao, Bamoun, Yoruba art


Yoruba Rider
African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Yoruba Rider

Within the Yoruba pantheon, Orunmila is the "orisa" deity that one consults in case of problem through divination ifà thanks to the diviner babalawo (iyanifà for a woman). Intended to sit enthroned on the ritual altar, this Yoruba-type sculpture is made up of a box intended for the sacred palm nuts, carried by a horseman figure. The character would embody Esu or Elegba, divine messenger who unites the orisa to men. Satin patina. Cracks and erosions on the base.
Centered on the veneration of its gods, or orisà, the Yoruba religion relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages (aroko). They are designed by the sculptors at the request of the followers, soothsayers and their customers. These spirits are said to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare. The kingdoms of Oyo and ...


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390.00

Yoruba altar
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba altar

It is in a carved sculpture intended to appear on a Yoruba altar that a deified ancestor, or one of the multiple gods, orisa, is embodied here, comparable to Christian saints. The latter animate the Yoruba pantheon, either the divine messenger Esù or Elégba. The equine, rare in the region, constituted a prestigious attribute which was reserved for the nobility and the sovereigns. The miniature figures would embody followers, provided with symbolic objects.
Crusty matte patina, desiccation cracks, losses.
The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern region of Benin under the name of Nago. They are patrilineal, practice excision and circumcision. Centered on its multiple gods or orisa, the Yoruba religion is famous for its ...


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390.00

Benin rider
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Benin rider

Benin African art is described as court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as Oba. The tradition of bronze court objects from the Benin Kingdom dates back to the 14th century. The many brass heads and statues created by the artists of Benin were reserved for the exclusive use of the inhabitants of the royal palace and, more often than not, placed on altars consecrated by each new Oba. These rectangular altars were surmounted by heads, statues, carved ivory tusks, bells and staves. They were used to commemorate an oba and to get in touch with his spirit. The craftsmen of Benin also produced figures of riders on horseback, representing according to the interpretations, either a Benin king, or a Yoruba emissary of the cavalry of Oyo. It could also be Oranmiyan, who ...


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650.00

Figure of rider Bembé, Beembé
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Cavalier Bembé

br-Figure of rider on his mount. Sometimes set with ivory or earthenware, the almond eyes are encrusted with bone. Lack on the base. Glossy, brown and black patina. Extra black wood base on request.
Oneblis on the plateaus of the People's Republic of Congo ex. Brazzaville, and not to be confused with the Bembé group of northern Lake Tanganinyika, the small Babembé group, Béembé, was influenced by the Téke rites and culture, but especially by that of the Kongo.Installed in the present-day Republic of Congo, the Beembe originally formed the kingdom of Kongo, along with the Vili, Yombé, Bwendé and B. They were under the tutelage of the king ntotela elected by the governors. The ivory, copper and slave trade were the main resources of this little-known group until colonization. The ...

Cavalier Yoruba Sango
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Yoruba

Representations of horsemen are very common in The African Yoruba Art, and for good reason, it is the central theme of history called "The Death and The Cavalier of The King".
This fiction tells the funeral of the late King of Oyo, a former African state founded in the 15th century, neighbor of the kingdom of Dahomey, and the tradition that his rider, Elesin, must commit suicide within thirty days of the death of the king in order to follow Yoruba religious dogma. The death of the rider is indeed intended to guarantee the king a safe drive to his new home.
Elesin, a simple man enjoying life, is given a mission he does not want and ends up disappointing the Yoruba people who place high expectations in him.

It was this myth that inspired the sculptor to make this ...


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Benin rider figure Bini Edo
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Benin Rider

The African art of Benin is described as a court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as Oba. The tradition of bronze classroom objects from the Benin Kingdom dates back to the 14th century. The many brass heads and statues created by the artists of Benin were reserved for the exclusive use of the inhabitants of the royal palace and, more often than not, placed on altars consecrated by each new Oba. These rectangular altars were surmounted by heads, statues, carved ivory tusks, bells and sticks. They were used to commemorate an oba and to get in touch with his spirit. The craftsmen of Benin also produced figures of horseriders, representing according to interpretations either a benign king or a Yoruba emissary of the oyo cavalry. It could also be Oranmiyan, which ...

Sao bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao bronze

Used as an amulet credited with apotropaic virtues, this small bronze sculpture constitutes, for the Sao, a talisman supposed to protect them from madness. It is therefore worn at all times. The genie that would possess the madman is represented by the rider, the horse representing the victim. This rider, wearing a chèche, rides an equine, which was a rare attribute of prestige in these regions of the Sahel, and has a lustrous patina. The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries in a geographical area stretching across the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. They settled on hills, which allowed them to repel invaders. Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, ...


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40.00

Sokoto Rider
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sokoto Rider

In African art , works of Sao Sokoto inspiration are mostly imprinted with the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of riders, usually in bronze, are cast and worn like talismans, patinated and polished by friction. They are considered above all as a remedy to fight against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genius who possesses it is symbolized by the rider.
Subjected to successive attacks from their neighbors in Kanem and then to hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the North-West of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. . More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now disappeared. ...


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Coupe Agere Ifa Yoruba
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Yoruba Cup

In the Yoruba pantheon, Orunmila is the deity of the which is consulted in case of problems through the divination ifà via the soothsayer babalawo (iyanifà for a woman). Intended to stand on the altar of the god, this sculpture consists of a cup that contained the sacred palm nuts and a rider figure. The character would embody Esu or Elegba , divine messenger who unites orisa to men. Cracks on the pot.
Centrée on the veneration of her gods, or orisà, the religion yoruba relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages ( aroko). They are designed by sculptors at the request of followers, soothsayers and their clients. These spirits are supposed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the disappearance of the civilization Ifé ...


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Sao Bronze
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao Bronze

Used as an amulet credited with apotropaic virtues, this small bronze sculpture constitutes, for the Sao, a talisman supposed to protect them from madness. It is therefore worn at all times. The genie that would possess the madman is represented by the rider, the horse representing the victim. This rider, wearing a chèche, rides an equine, which was a rare attribute of prestige in these regions of the Sahel, and has a lustrous golden patina. The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries in a geographical area stretching across the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. They settled on hills, which allowed them to repel invaders. Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from ...


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Yoruba rider
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Yoruba rider

Dedicated to enthroning on a Yoruba altar, this statuette here embodies a deified ancestor, one of the many gods, orisa , comparable to the Christian saints, who make up the Yoruba pantheon, or even the divine messenger Esù or Elégba . The equine, rare in the region, was an attribute of prestige which was reserved for the nobility and sovereigns. This type of sculpture presents recurring elements such as a frame of different proportions from those of the rider. The horse perched on a pedestal has indeed a reduced size. The character with the typical Yoruba facies has triple claw incisions on the face and has an ax. Crusty polychrome patina. Abrasions and desiccation cracks.
The Yoruba, over 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central and southeastern ...


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Dogon Rider
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Dogon Rider

Prestigious sculptures in the African art of Mali
Frequent horseman's representations, among the Dogon of Mali, refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos, ancestors of men, resurrected by the creator god Amma, descended on the earth carried by an arch transformed into a horse. Moreover, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious leader named Hogon, was parading on his mount at his induction because, according to custom, he was not to set foot on the ground. In the area of the cliffs of Sangha, inaccessible on horseback, the priests wore it, while hating in reference to the mythical ancestor Nommo. The Dakar-Djibouti mission of 1931, led by Marcel Griaule , was tasked with studying in depth the rites of this population ...


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Yoruba rider figure
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Yoruba rider

It is in a carved statuette intended to appear on a Yoruba altar that is embodied here a deified ancestor, or one of the multiple gods, orisa, comparable to Christian saints. The latter animate the pantheon of the Yoruba, either the divine messenger Esù or Elégba . The equine, rare in the region, was an attribute of prestige that was reserved for the nobility and the rulers. This sculpture has certain constant elements and characteristics such as a mount with different proportions from the rider. The horse perched on a pedestal is indeed smaller in size. The character with a typically Yoruba face has triple incisions on his face, smokes a pipe and carries a spear. Shaded patina. Residues of kaolin. The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central ...


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Dogon head
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Dogon head

African Tribal Art Dogon.
Fragment of dogon rider sculpture. Velvety matte patina. Desication erosions and cracks.
Height on base: 45 cm.
The frequent representations of riders among the Dogon of Mali refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos, ancestors of men, resuscitated by the creator god Amma, descended to earth carried by an ark transformed into a horse. In addition, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious leader named Hogon, paraded on his mount during his enthronement because according to custom he was not to set foot on the ground. In the region of the cliffs of Sangha, inaccessible on horseback, the priests wore it, while neighing in reference to the mythical ancestor Nommo. Dogon ...


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Rider Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao Rider

In African art, works of Sao Sokoto inspiration are predominantly imbued with the equestrian world.
Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen generally in bronze are cast and worn as talismans, patinated and glossed by rubbing. They are considered above all as a remedy against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie that possesses him is symbolized by the rider.
Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the North-West of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now ...

Dogon horseman in bronze
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Dogon horseman

The frequent representations of horsemen, among the Dogon of Mali, refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos, ancestors of men, resurrected by the creator god Amma, came down to earth carried by an ark transformed into a horse. Moreover, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious chief named Hogon, paraded on his horse during his enthronement because according to the custom he was not supposed to set foot on the ground. In the region of the Sangha cliffs, inaccessible by horse, the priests carried him, neighing in reference to the mythical ancestor Nommo. The Dakar-Djibouti mission of 1931, led by Marcel Griaule, was charged with studying in depth the rites of this population established in the region of the cliffs of Bandiagara, ...


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Dogon rider figure
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze Dogon

The elegance of proportions and attitudes, in this African work of art made of bronze, has been skillfully translated by the Dogon blacksmith. These form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim . Today they produce weapons, tools,and also work with wood. "Masters of fire", they are also supposed to cure burns (Huib Blom). The frequent representations of horsemen among the Dogon of Mali refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos , ancestors of man, resurrected by the creator god Amma , descended to earth carried on an ark metamorphosed into a horse. In addition, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious leader named Hogon , paraded on his mount during his enthronement because according to custom he was not to set foot on ...


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Rider Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Rider Sao

Used as an amulet credited with apotropaic virtues, this bronze sculpture constitutes, for the Sao, a talisman supposed to protect them from madness. It is therefore worn at all times. The genie that would possess the madman is represented by the rider, the horse representing the victim. This rider, wearing a chèche, rides an equine, which was a rare attribute of prestige in these regions of the Sahel. The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries in a geographical area stretching across the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. They settled on hills, which allowed them to repel invaders. Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to ...

Bronze Sao
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Bronze Sao

In African art, Sao Sokoto inspired works are mostly imprinted with the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen generally in bronze are cast and worn as talismans, patinated and glossed by rubbing. They are considered above all as a remedy against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie that possesses them is symbolized by the rider.
Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the northwest of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now disappeared. They were found ...


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Cavalier Bambara
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Cavalier Bambara

The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, such as the Soninke and Malinke. They believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala who maintains the order of the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, who gave all the qualities to men and who grows the fruits of the earth. Large masked festivals close the initiation rites of the dyo association and the ritual of the gwan of the bambara in the south of the Bambara country. Spread over a seven-year period for men, they are less demanding for women. The new initiates then celebrate, in groups, from village to village, their symbolic rebirth. These are the sons of the blacksmiths who dance around the statues that were available outside the festivities grouped ...


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Benin horse rider
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Benin horse rider

Numerous heads and statues out of bronze made by Benin craftmen were kept for personal use of the nobility., and , most of the time put on altars consecrated by each new Oba. These rectangular-shaped altars were surmounted by heads, statues, carved ivory tusks, bells and staffs. They were being used to recall a Oba and to get in touch with his spirit.


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