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African art - Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba :

The riders are generally made of bronze, but many of them are made of wood. True masterpieces of Dogon, Sao, Bamoun, Yoruba art


Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji rider
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao bronze

In African art, Sao Sokoto inspired works are mostly marked by the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen, generally made of bronze, are cast and worn as talismans, with a patina and a lustrous finish. They are considered above all as a remedy against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie that possesses them is symbolized by the rider.
Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the northwest of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now disappeared. They ...


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40.00  32.00

Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji rider
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao bronze

In African art, Sao Sokoto inspired works are mostly marked by the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen, generally made of bronze, are cast and worn as talismans, with a patina and a lustrous finish. They are considered above all as a remedy against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie that possesses them is symbolized by the rider.
Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the northwest of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now disappeared. They ...


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Dogon horseman figure in bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon rider

This statuette represents a horsewoman, carrying a spear. Brown patina with residual ochre inlays. The frequent representations of horsemen among the Dogon of Mali refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos, ancestors of the men, resuscitated by the creator god Amma, came down on the earth carried by an ark metamorphosed into a horse. Moreover, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious chief named Hogon, paraded on his horse during his enthronement because according to the custom he should not put his foot on the ground. In the region of the Sangha cliffs, inaccessible by horse, the priests carried him, neighing in reference to the mythical ancestor Nommo.
The Dogon blacksmiths form an endogamous caste among the Dogon ...


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280.00

Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji rider
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Sao bronze

In African art, Sao Sokoto inspired works are mostly marked by the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen, generally in bronze, are cast and worn as talismans, patinated and polished by rubbing. They are considered above all as a remedy against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie that possesses them is symbolized by the rider.
Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the northwest of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now disappeared. They were ...


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40.00  32.00

Yoruba rider figure
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Yoruba rider

It is in a carved statuette intended to appear on a Yoruba altar that is embodied here a deified ancestor, or one of the multiple gods, orisa, comparable to Christian saints. The latter animate the pantheon of the Yoruba, either the divine messenger Esù or Elégba . The equine, rare in the region, was an attribute of prestige that was reserved for the nobility and the rulers. This sculpture has certain constant elements and characteristics such as a mount with different proportions from the rider. The horse perched on a pedestal is indeed smaller in size. The character with a typically Yoruba face has triple incisions on his face, smokes a pipe and carries a spear. Shaded patina. Residues of kaolin. The Yoruba, more than 20 million, occupy southwestern Nigeria and the central ...


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180.00  144.00

Cavalier Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Horseman Sao

Used as an amulet credited with apotropaic virtues, this small bronze sculpture constitutes, for the Sao, a talisman supposed to protect them from madness. It is therefore worn permanently. The genius who would possess the madman is represented by the rider, the horse representing the victim. The rider wearing a goat's head is riding an equine which was a rare attribute of prestige in these regions of the Sahel. Golden brown patina.
The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the 12th and 14th centuries in a geographical area stretching along the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. They settled on hills, which enabled them to repel invaders. Subjected to successive assaults from their neighbors in Kanem and then to hordes from the East, the ...

Equestrian figure Lobi
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Cavaliers Lobi

Minimalism and stylization for this figure of African tribal art coated with a rusty ochre patina. Riding an equine, this couple is equipped with a hoe, symbolizing the work of the earth, but also a shield, linked to the status of warrior. The populations of the same cultural region, grouped under the name " lobi ", make up one-fifth of Burkina Faso's population. Few in Ghana, they also settled in northern Côte d'Ivoire. It was at the end of the 18th century that the Lobi, from northern Ghana, established themselves among the Thuna and Puguli Autochtons, Dagara, Dian, Gan and Birifor. The Lobi believe in a creator God named Thangba Thu , to whom they address through the worship of many intermediate spirits, the Thil, the latter being supposed to protect them, with the help of the sooth, ...


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Horseman Dogon in bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon Bronze

This statuette would represent the Hogon, who rode without a saddle. Grey-green patina. The frequent representations of horsemen among the Dogon of Mali refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos, ancestors of the men, resuscitated by the creator god Amma, came down on the earth carried by an ark metamorphosed into a horse. Moreover, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious chief named Hogon, paraded on his horse during his enthronement because according to the custom he should not put his foot on the ground. In the region of the Sangha cliffs, inaccessible by horse, the priests carried him, neighing in reference to the mythical ancestor Nommo. The Dakar-Djibouti mission of 1931, led by Marcel Griaule, was charged with ...


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320.00

Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji Horseman
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Horseman Sao

This bronze has a copper patina. The warrior depicted on his mount has his head wrapped in a choir identical to those of the Tuareg.

In African art, The Works of Sao Sokoto Inspiration are mostly imprinted with the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small specimens of riders usually in bronze are melted and worn like talismans, patinated and lustrous by friction. They are seen above all as a remedy to fight possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genius who possesses it is symbolized by the rider. Subjected to the successive onslaughts of their neighbours in Kanem and then to hordes from the east, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in northwestern Cameroon where they mixed with the natives giving ...

Cavalier Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Bronze Sao

Ex-collection french african art.

This bronze has a copper patina. The warrior represented on his mount has his head wrapped in a chestnut identical to those of the Tuaregs.
In African art, Sao Sokoto-inspired works are mostly imbued with the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of riders, generally in bronze, are melted and worn like talismans, patinated and polished by friction. They are considered above all as a remedy to fight against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie who possesses it is symbolized by the rider. Subjected to successive assaults from their neighbors in Kanem and then to hordes coming from the East, the Sao had to abandon their land to settle in the ...

Horseman Dogon in bronze
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze Dogont

Ex-collection of French African art.

The frequent representations of the rider, among the Dogon of Mali, refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos, ancestors of men, resurrected by the creator god Amma, descended on the earth carried by an arch transformed into a horse. Moreover, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious leader named Hogon, paraded on his mount during his induction because it was customary for him not to set foot on the ground. In the region of the cliffs of Sangha, inaccessible on horseback, the priests wore it, while whining in reference to the mythical ancestor Nommo. The Dakar-Djibouti mission of 1931, led by Marcel Griaule, was tasked with studying in depth the rites of this population established in ...


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Horseman Sao Sokoto in bronze
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze Sao

This bronze has a copper patina. The warrior represented on his mount has his head wrapped in a chestnut identical to those of the Tuaregs. Base in addition.
In African art, Sao Sokoto-inspired works are mostly imbued with the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of riders, generally in bronze, are melted and worn like talismans, patinated and polished by friction. They are considered above all as a remedy to fight against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie who possesses it is symbolized by the rider. Subjected to successive assaults from their neighbors in Kanem and then to hordes coming from the East, the Sao had to abandon their land to settle in the North-West of Cameroon ...


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Cavalier Yoruba Sango
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Statue Yoruba

Representations of horsemen are very common in The African Yoruba Art, and for good reason, it is the central theme of history called "The Death and The Cavalier of The King".
This fiction tells the funeral of the late King of Oyo, a former African state founded in the 15th century, neighbor of the kingdom of Dahomey, and the tradition that his rider, Elesin, must commit suicide within thirty days of the death of the king in order to follow Yoruba religious dogma. The death of the rider is indeed intended to guarantee the king a safe drive to his new home.
Elesin, a simple man enjoying life, is given a mission he does not want and ends up disappointing the Yoruba people who place high expectations in him.

It was this myth that inspired the sculptor to make this ...


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Horseman Dogon in bronze
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > New product

br>Image of the rider in the African art Dogon
This rider figure would represent a priest .hogon. The stylized horse has stretched legs. The sculpture is patinated in light green.
The frequent representations of a rider, among the Dogon of Mali, refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos, ancestors of men, resurrected by the creator god Amma, descended on the earth carried by an arch transformed into a horse. Moreover, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious leader named Hogon , paraded on his mount during his induction because it was customary for him not to set foot on the ground. In the region of the cliffs of Sangha, inaccessible on horseback, the priests wore it, while whining in reference to the mythical ancestor ...


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Coupe Agere Ifa Yoruba
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Yoruba Cup

In the Yoruba pantheon, Orunmila is the deity of the which is consulted in case of problems through the divination ifà via the soothsayer babalawo (iyanifà for a woman). Intended to stand on the altar of the god, this sculpture consists of a cup that contained the sacred palm nuts and a rider figure. The character would embody Esu or Elegba , divine messenger who unites orisa to men. Cracks on the pot.
Centrée on the veneration of her gods, or orisà, the religion yoruba relies on artistic sculptures with coded messages ( aroko). They are designed by sculptors at the request of followers, soothsayers and their clients. These spirits are supposed to intercede with the supreme god Olodumare. The kingdoms of Oyo and Ijebu were born following the disappearance of the civilization Ifé ...


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Cavalier Bamana
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Cavalier Bambara

The Bambara of central and southern Mali belong to the large Mande group, such as the Soninke and Malinke. They believe in the existence of a creator god generically called Ngala who maintains the order of the universe. His existence coexists with another androgynous god called Faro, who gave all the qualities to men and who grows the fruits of the earth. Large masked festivals close the initiation rites of the dyo association and the ritual of the gwan of the bambara in the south of the Bambara country. Spread over a seven-year period for men, they are less demanding for women. The new initiates then celebrate, in groups, from village to village, their symbolic rebirth. These are the sons of the blacksmiths who dance around the statues that were available outside the festivities grouped ...


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Cavalier Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze Sao

This bronze has a copper patina. The warrior represented on his mount has his head wrapped in a chestnut identical to those of the Tuaregs.
In African art, Sao Sokoto-inspired works are mostly imbued with the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of riders, generally in bronze, are melted and worn like talismans, patinated and polished by friction. They are considered above all as a remedy to fight against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie who possesses it is symbolized by the rider. Subjected to successive assaults from their neighbors in Kanem and then to hordes coming from the East, the Sao had to abandon their land to settle in the North-West of Cameroon where they ...

Cavalier Sao Kotoko Putchu Guinadji
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Bronze Sao

Used as an amulet credited with apotropaic virtues, this small bronze sculpture is, for the Sao, a talisman supposed to protect them from madness. It is therefore worn at all times. The genius who would possess the madman is represented by the rider, the horse depicting the victim. The rider wearing a cheche rides an equine that was a rare prestige attribute in these sahel regions. Golden brown patina.
The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the 12th and 14th centuries in a geographical area extending along the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. They settled on hills, which allowed them to repel the invaders. Subjected to successive onslaughts from their Kanem neighbours and then to hordes from the east, the Sao had to abandon their lands to ...

Cavalier Sao Kotoko Putchu Guinadji
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Horseman Sao

Used as an amulet credited with apotropaic virtues, this small bronze sculpture is, for the Sao, a talisman supposed to protect them from madness. It is therefore worn at all times. The genius who would possess the madman is represented by the rider, the horse depicting the victim. This rider wearing a cheche rides an equine that was a rare attribute of prestige in these regions of the Sahel, has an interesting patina of use. The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the 12th and 14th centuries in a geographical area extending along the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. They settled on hills, which allowed them to repel the invaders. Subjected to the successive onslaughts of their neighbours in Kanem and then to hordes from the east, the Sao had to ...

Horseman Bambara
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African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Horseman Bambara

Naturalist sculpture of rider Bambara riding his horse raw, evoking traditional races. The room features a warm brown glossy patina.
In-Central and Southern Mali, in a savannah area, the Bambara , " Bamana " or " unbelievers ", as the Muslims have named them, belong to the large Group Mande, along with the Soninke and Malinke. Mostly farmers, but also herders, they make up the largest ethnic group in Mali. In addition to their remarkable masks, the Bozo and Bambara are renowned for their puppets of various sizes. The groups of craftsmen bambara nyamakala , more specifically the blacksmiths named numu , are in charge of the sculpture of ritual objects, endowed with the nyama , occult energy. Using fire and magical objects, the role of healer and soothsayer is also assigned to them. ...


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Dogon Horsemen s Cup in Bronze
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon Cup

The emblematic cuts of African dogon art
On this figurative cut for ceremonial use, the Hogon, religious leader personified by the rider on his mount, is perched on the lid. The cut is supported by particularly stylized horses. Nommo, a mythical ancestor to which the rider also refers, is a water god who taught humans to weave(Mr. Buratti). Grey-green patina.
The Dogons are a people renowned for their cosmogony, myths and rituals. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living southwest of the Niger Loop in mali's Mopti region (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest of Ouahigouya). Their religious leader, the Hogon, the highest authority of the Dogon people, was parading on his mount at his induction because it was customary ...





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