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African art - African bronze:

We find in African art a multitude of bronze objects made in the purest animist tradition by the blacksmiths of the village. Nigeria thanks to the kingdoms Benin and Ifé was a big producer of bronze objects. The statues, heads, usual objects in bronze are of a superb invoice thanks to the use of the process of the lost wax which consists in the creation of a massive model in clay. It is covered with a layer of wax by adding metal rods. Then we cover the whole with refractory clay leaving a hole in the upper part. When it is dry, it is heated which melts the wax which is inside, then the bronze is poured. Finally there is only to break the inner clay to recover the bronze object.


Bronze Ifé commemorative head
African art > African bronze > Ife mask

French African art collection.
She represents the Oni, king of Ife city cradle of the Yorubas, with its crown on its head, a cone overlooking it. Today, the king of Ifé wears a similar function badge, formed of a vertical segment braided and finished at the top by a sharp bulge. Such a head was attached to the top of a wooden effigy, dressed, to represent the late king at the funeral, and then buried after the ceremony in a shrine near the palace.
The city of Ife in Nigeria was in the 15th century the centre of a powerful forest state in the western Niger Delta. The work of bronze was a prerogative of the king,'s time, according to the technique of lost wax. These prestigious objects embodying the sovereigns were placed on the royal altars for ceremonial use. It is said to be ...


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550.00

Bronze Ifé commemorative head
African art > African bronze > Head Yoruba

It represents the Oni, king of Ifé city cradle of the Yorubas, with its crown on its head, a cone overlooking it. Today, the king of Ifé wears a similar function badge, formed of a vertical segment braided and finished at the top by a sharp bulge. Such a head was attached to the top of a wooden effigy, dressed, to represent the late king at the funeral, and then buried after the ceremony in a shrine near the palace.
The city of Ife in Nigeria was in the 15th century the centre of a powerful forest state in the western Niger Delta. The work of bronze was a prerogative of the king,'s time, according to the technique of lost wax. These prestigious objects embodying the sovereigns were placed on the royal altars for ceremonial use. It is said to be a craftsman of Ilé-Ifé who would have ...


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650.00

Figure of dignitary Benin
African art > African bronze > Bronze Benin

This commemorative figure of dignitary forms an intermediary between the spiritual world and the Edo people, and stands out thanks to a garment including sumptuous adornments of necklaces and talismans in agate and coral beads. Perched on a barrel-shaped piedestal, his attitude reflects presence and dignity. The kings of Benin being soldiers above all, he is represented with symbolic attributes illustrating power. Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba , was illustrated by numerous works celebrating their power. War scenes glorifying them were reproduced on narrative plates, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, majestic felines, heavy bracelets, ...


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380.00

Cavalier Sao Kotoko Putchu Guinadji
African art > African bronze > Horseman Sao

Used as an amulet credited with apotropaic virtues, this small bronze sculpture is, for the Sao, a talisman supposed to protect them from madness. It is therefore worn at all times. The genius who would possess the madman is represented by the rider, the horse depicting the victim. This rider wearing a cheche rides an equine that was a rare attribute of prestige in these regions of the Sahel, has an interesting patina of use. The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the 12th and 14th centuries in a geographical area extending along the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. They settled on hills, which allowed them to repel the invaders. Subjected to the successive onslaughts of their neighbours in Kanem and then to hordes from the east, the Sao had to ...

Figure Kongo in bronze
African art > African bronze > Statuette Congo

This small anthropomorphic sculpture, made of bronze, takes in miniature the canons of the Kongo statuary, especially the funerary statues inyongo or mintadi of lower Zaire, which were made of stone and represented various themes thanks to characters frozen in varied attitudes. These figures form the vital embodiment of a spirit or ancestor. 
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the group Kôngo , led by King ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory, copper and slave trade. Similarly, beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary with a codified gesture in relation to their worldview. The sorcerers nganga, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God ...


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245.00

Cavalier Sao Kotoko Putchu Guinadji
African art > African Rider > Bronze Sao

Used as an amulet credited with apotropaic virtues, this small bronze sculpture is, for the Sao, a talisman supposed to protect them from madness. It is therefore worn at all times. The genius who would possess the madman is represented by the rider, the horse depicting the victim. The rider wearing a cheche rides an equine that was a rare prestige attribute in these sahel regions. Golden brown patina.
The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the 12th and 14th centuries in a geographical area extending along the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. They settled on hills, which allowed them to repel the invaders. Subjected to successive onslaughts from their Kanem neighbours and then to hordes from the east, the Sao had to abandon their lands to ...

Bronze Kongo statuette
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African art > African bronze > Bronze Congo

This small anthropomorphic sculpture takes in miniature the canons of the Kongo statuary, especially the funerary statues inyongo or mintadi of lower Zaire, which were made of stone and represented various themes thanks to characters frozen in various attitudes. These figures form the vital embodiment of a spirit or ancestor. Comes with plexi base.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the group Kôngo , led by King ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory, copper and slave trade. Similarly, beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary with a codified gesture in relation to their worldview. The sorcerers nganga, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the ...


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Sao Kotoko Putchu Guinadji horseman
objet vendu
African art > African bronze > Horseman Sao

Ex-collection French African art.
Used as an amulet credited with apotropaic virtues, this small bronze sculpture is, for the Saos, a talisman supposed to protect them from madness. It is therefore worn at all times. The genius who would possess the madman is represented by the rider, the horse depicting the victim. This rider wearing a cheche rides an equine that was a rare attribute of prestige in these regions of the Sahel, has an interesting patina of use. The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the 12th and 14th centuries in a geographical area extending along the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. They settled on hills, which allowed them to repel the invaders. Subjected to the successive onslaughts of their neighbours in Kanem and then to ...

Tikar Ritual Bell
African art > African bronze > Bronze Tikar

The leaders of the Cameroonian Grasslands, the Fon , reputed to hold treasures of works of art, including bracelets, necklaces, statues, bells, valued the founders and sculptors in the service of the kingdom. These productions, without which the conductor lost his prestige, aimed to magnify the role of the fon. The technique used was the cast with lost wax, the decorations varying according to the status of the recipient to whom the king wished to award a reward. The Bamoun sometimes bought works from the Tikars, who were also gifted in metalwork. From 1920, the founders no longer used exclusively for the court. Located in the border region of Nigeria, the northwestern province of Cameroon, Grassland is made up of several ethnic groups: Tikar, Anyang, Widekum, Chamba, Bamoun and Bamileke. ...


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450.00

Dogon sun
objet vendu
African art > Jewels > Dogon sun

Superb Dogon sun, patina and visible oxidation.

About this subject, there is a remarkable story, the traditional symbolism found there, this one is narrated by Philippe Doussin

That was very long. At the time the sky was close to the earth, so close that evening, mothers took down the stars for children to play with before falling asleep.
At the beginning of this cycle of mankind, men could get without any trouble (for Heaven and Earth are closest "Rights") in contact with the metaphysical (heaven), because they were in nothing different from the primordial man (the Edenic state, generally known among all peoples traditional "ancestor") in connection with permanent Being (and the Supreme Principle). Children born in this state already, and all spiritual ...


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Leopard figure Benin
African art > African bronze > Bronze Leopard

The leopard, depicting the royal power, has a central place in the culture of the benign kingdom because this animal appears in the founding myth of which King Ewuare is the hero. According to legend, he wakes up after spending a night next to a leopard and a snake without realizing it. As in other cosmogonies, animals are the manifestation or even the embodiment of supernatural forces. Being spared by these predators is therefore a sign of a divine blessing. Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba , was illustrated by numerous works celebrating their power. War scenes were reproduced on narrative plates, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, heavy ...


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650.00

Tikar Ceremonial Bell
African art > African bronze > Tikar Bell

This heavy bell engraved with abundant decorative motifs illustrates Tikar art. A sphere forms the handle of the rectangular-shaped resonant case with looped edges. The gong is still present. Concentric patterns, spirals and lozenges alternate on the surface. Patine with bronze reflections.
The chiefs of the Cameroonian Grasslands, the Fon , reputed to hold treasures of works of art, including bracelets, necklaces, statues, bells, valued the founders and sculptors in the service of the kingdom. These productions, without which the conductor lost his prestige, were intended to magnify the role of the fon. The technique used was the cast with lost wax, the decorations vary according to the status of the recipient to whom the king wished to grant a reward. The Bamouns sometimes bought ...


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480.00

Tikar s prestigious bronze tab
objet vendu
African art > African Chair > Tikar Seat

Attesting to the social origin of its owner, the African chair is a piece of furniture designed to enhance its prestige. It is therefore often decorated in its middle part with anthropomorphic or zoomorphic figures in relation to the founding myths and beliefs of the ethnic group. The specimen presented is formed of a ring on which five graceful caryatid figures, perched on heads, support with their arms raised a circular seat. The tray is engraved with regular concentric motifs and broken lines, and drawings of cauris, symbols of wealth. The characters with the filiform body have a voluminous head typical of Cameroonian statuary.
The Tikars populate the western part of central Cameroon, which lies within the dense secondary forest of medium altitude, along the Mbam. Within this ...

Dogon couple figures in bronze
objet vendu
African art > African bronze > Bronze Dogon

Silhouettes of longiform African art, tribal-inspired, standing on a pedestal. These African statues Dogon, in bronze, evoke the Nommos, the origin of the creation among the Dogon of Mali. Recalling also the sculptures of the famous Giacometti, they are represented in the position of invocation, arms raised to the sky. Their surface is punctuated by a succession of notches. Warm orange skate. The Dogons are a people renowned for their cosmogony, esotericism, myths and legends. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living southwest of the Niger Loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest of Ouahigouya). Villages are often perched atop the scree at the edge of the hills, according to a unique architecture. ...

Yoruba figure
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African art > African bronze > Yoruba figure


In African art, the horse occupies a very important mythical place among the Yoruba, although there are few representations of a man on horseback. On the contrary, it is much more widespread among Dogons.
There are several speculations about the identity of the figure depicted on the equestrian figures found in Benin. It could be a Yoruba warrior, a king of Benin or Oranmiyan, founder of the present dynasty that imported the horses to Benin. In each hand, it has an object. This is a spear and a scepter, the ultimate regal symbols.
Faithful to the aesthetic canons of the ethnic group, this statuette is worked with many details. For the sake of realism, each element is decorated and finely carved.

The Yoruba society is very organized and has several ...


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Bronze Kongo statuette
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African art > African bronze > Statuette Congo

This small anthropomorphic sculpture, of kisi type, takes in miniature the canons of the Kongo statuary, and in particular the funerary statues inyongo or mintadi of lower Zaire, which were made of stone. These figures form the vital embodiment of a spirit or ancestor. Comes with plexi base.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the group Kôngo , led by King ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory, copper and slave trade. Similarly, beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary with a codified gesture in relation to their worldview. The sorcerers nganga, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God called Nzambi by the help of consecrated figures. To ...


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Rider Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji
objet vendu
African art > African bronze > Rider Sao

Ex-collection French African tribal art.
In African art, Sao Sokoto-inspired works are mostly imprinted with the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small copies of riders usually in bronze are melted and worn like talismans, patinated and lustrous by friction. They are seen above all as a remedy to fight possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genius who possesses it is symbolized by the rider. Subjected to successive onslaughts from their neighbours in Kanem and then to hordes from the east, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in northwestern Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko.More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization now extinct. ...

Bronze Benin commemorative head
objet vendu
African art > African bronze > Head Benin

Wearing a seaily that consisted of coral beads, from which laterally protrude from fins, this head with a circular border represents a ruler (oba) of Benin. Symbol of wealth, this coral reserved for kings and digesters of the palace had to be regularly anointed with the blood of the victims in order to acquire a magical power. The lateral appendages named ikekeze protrude from the crown. Golden beige patina.
Famous in benign art, altar heads, symbols of wisdom and receptacles of energy, were cast using the technique of lost wax like other bronzes. Benin art is described as a court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as oba. The tradition of Ifè's bronze classroom objects dates back to the 14th century.
The many bronze heads and statues created by the ...

Dogon Horsemen s Cup in Bronze
African art > African bronze > Dogon Cup

The emblematic cuts of African dogon art
On this figurative cut for ceremonial use, the Hogon, religious leader personified by the rider on his mount, is perched on the lid. The cut is supported by particularly stylized horses. Nommo, a mythical ancestor to which the rider also refers, is a water god who taught humans to weave(Mr. Buratti). Grey-green patina.
The Dogons are a people renowned for their cosmogony, myths and rituals. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living southwest of the Niger Loop in mali's Mopti region (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest of Ouahigouya). Their religious leader, the Hogon, the highest authority of the Dogon people, was parading on his mount at his induction because it was customary ...


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280.00

Couple primordial Dogon
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African art > African Statues > Couple Dogon

Ex-collection French African art.
The primordial couple Nommos, the origin of the creation among the Dogon of Mali, is here embodied by these long-legged silouhettes, frozen arms spread out of the bust and legs joined. Red ochre patina. The Dogons are a people renowned for their cosmogony, esotericism, myths and legends. Their population is estimated at about 300,000 souls living southwest of the Niger Loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (northwest of Ouahigouya). Villages are often perched atop the scree at the edge of the hills, according to a unique architecture. The history of migration and the facilities of the Dogon (about ten main groups, fifteen different languages), relates to several hypotheses. According ...


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Benin altar figure
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African art > African Statues > Benin Statue

The mastery of bronze in African art.

A rebellion in the 18th century would have forced the king, or Oba , Ewuakpe to leave the palace to escape in his native village. His royal crown was replaced by a European helmet. However, he is depicted with his ceremonial sword Eben , seeking to regain his throne. The second object he has would be a lightning stone, in the shape of an axe, symbol of Ogiuwu , god of death and thunder. Black brown patina, golden highlights and grey-green inlays.
The art of Benin is described as a court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as oba. The tradition of bronze classroom objects from Ifè dates back to the 14th century. Before the destruction of the palace of the kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of ...


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