...
Search option




Discover our exceptionnal items

African art - Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues:

In African art, one finds a multitude of bronze objects made in the purest animist tradition by the village blacksmiths. Nigeria, thanks to the Benin and Ife kingdoms, was a major producer of bronze objects. The statues, heads and everyday objects made of bronze are of superb workmanship thanks to the use of the lost wax process which consists of creating a massive model in clay. This is covered with a layer of wax and metal rods are added. Then we cover the whole with refractory clay leaving a hole in the upper part. When it is dry, it is heated, which melts the wax inside, and then the bronze is poured in. Finally there is only to break the clay inside to recover the bronze object.


Benin rider
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Benin rider

Benin African art is described as court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as Oba. The tradition of bronze court objects from the Benin Kingdom dates back to the 14th century. The many brass heads and statues created by the artists of Benin were reserved for the exclusive use of the inhabitants of the royal palace and, more often than not, placed on altars consecrated by each new Oba. These rectangular altars were surmounted by heads, statues, carved ivory tusks, bells and staves. They were used to commemorate an oba and to get in touch with his spirit. The craftsmen of Benin also produced figures of riders on horseback, representing according to the interpretations, either a Benin king, or a Yoruba emissary of the cavalry of Oyo. It could also be Oranmiyan, who ...


View details

Sold

Bénin Head
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bénin Head

This late African bronze, made from a work that was made on the death of the queen, depicts a queen mother of Benin named the Iyoba, whose neck is surrounded by multiple necklaces of coral beads. Her high curved hairstyle was also made up of a mesh of pearls falling on either side of the face. After the birth of the future king, the queen was "removed" from power and could no longer father. But at the end of the 15th century the Oba Esigie refused to conform to this practice and wanted to attribute the city of Uselu to his mother. She also received a palace and many privileges. In recognition she raised an army to go and fight the Igala of the North. The Oba cast a head in his effigy, among many works cast in lost wax, to place them on his altar after his death.


View details

Sold

Bénin Statuette
promo art africain
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bénin Statuette

This commemorative figure of a benign dignitary, represented seated, forms an intermediary between the spiritual world and the Edo people, and is distinguished by its ornaments in agate and coral beads. The kings of Benin being soldiers above all, he is represented with symbolic attributes illustrating power. This bronze could constitute the top of a stick. Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. War scenes glorifying them were reproduced on narrative plaques, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, majestic felines, heavy bracelets, anklets and recades were produced in quantity in many ...


View details

280.00  224.00

Bénin Head
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bénin Head

The African art of Benin is described as court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as the Oba. The tradition of bronze court objects from the Benin Kingdom dates back to the 14th century. The many bronze alloy heads and statues created by the artists of Benin were reserved for the exclusive use of the inhabitants of the royal palace and, more often than not, placed on altars consecrated by each new Oba. This late sculpture, reminiscent of those made when the queen died, features a queen mother of Benin named the Iyoba, whose neck is encircled with multiple necklaces of coral beads. Her high hairstyle was also made up of a mesh of pearls falling on either side of her face. After the birth of the future king, the queen was "removed" from power and could no longer ...


View details

480.00

Dogon Bronze
African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Dogon Bronze

Collection of African Belgian art
The frequent representations of riders among the Dogon of Mali refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos, ancestors of men, resuscitated by the creator god Amma, descended to earth carried by an ark transformed into a horse. In addition, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious leader named Hogon, paraded on his mount during his enthronement because according to custom he was not to set foot on the ground. In the region of the cliffs of Sangha, inaccessible on horseback, the priests wore it, while neighing in reference to the mythical ancestor Nommo. Ocher brown patina. Dogon blacksmiths form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim. They now produce weapons, tools, and also work ...


View details

290.00

Head Benin
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Head Benin

The African art of Benin is described as a court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as Oba. The tradition of bronze classroom objects from the Benin Kingdom dates back to the 14th century. The many bronze alloy heads and statues created by the artists of Benin were reserved for the exclusive use of the inhabitants of the royal palace and, more often than not, placed on altars consecrated by each new Oba. These rectangular altars were surmounted by heads, statues, carved ivory tusks, bells and sticks. They were used to commemorate an oba and to get in touch with his spirit. This late sculpture, which was made on the death of the Queen, depicts a queen mother of Benin named the Iyoba , whose neck is surrounded by multiple necklaces of coral beads. Her high curved ...


View details

Sold

Bamoun Pipe
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bamoun Pipe

Bronze sculptures in African Grassland art.
Ceremonial pipe intended for ceremonies, offering along the stem, an openwork section composed of elephant heads then a figure evoking a bird with protruding eyes. Golden copper patina.
Located in the border region of Nigeria, the North West province of Cameroon, the Grassland is made up of several ethnic groups: Tikar, Anyang, Widekum, Chamba, Bamoun and Bamileke. Several centralized chiefdoms, or kingdoms, based on customary associations, secret societies, are organized around the Fon who would have broad supernatural powers including that of being able to change into an animal. The chiefs of the Cameroonian Grasslands, the Fon, reputed to hold treasures of works of art, including bracelets, necklaces, statues, bells, valued ...


View details

Sold

Yoruba Head
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Yoruba Head

Figurative bronze representing the Oni, king of Ifé cradle city of the Yoruba, wearing a detailed crown. Nowadays the King of Ifé wears a similar function badge, formed of a braided vertical segment ending in a pointed bulge. Such a head was attached to the top of a wooden effigy, dressed to represent the deceased king at the funeral, then buried after the ceremony in a sanctuary near the palace. Black patina, abrasions.
The city of Ifé in Nigeria was in the 15th century the center of a powerful state in the forests west of the Niger delta. Bronze work was a prerogative of the "oni" king, using the lost wax technique. These prestigious objects embodying the sovereigns were placed on the royal altars for ceremonial use. It would be a craftsman from Ilé-Ifé who would have taught ...


View details

Sold

Sao bronze
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao bronze

Used as an amulet credited with apotropaic virtues, this small bronze sculpture constitutes, for the Sao, a talisman supposed to protect them from madness. It is therefore worn at all times. The genie that would possess the madman is represented by the rider, the horse representing the victim. This rider, wearing a chèche, rides an equine, which was a rare attribute of prestige in these regions of the Sahel, and has a lustrous patina. The Sao, ancestors of the Kotoko, were established between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries in a geographical area stretching across the borders between Chad, northern Cameroon and Nigeria. They settled on hills, which allowed them to repel invaders. Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, ...


View details

Sold

Do you want to hide sold items ? if yes, click HERE
Bénin bronze
promo art africain
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bénin bronze

This late African bronze of the Benin type, made from a work that was created on the death of the queen, depicts a queen mother of Benin named the Iyoba, whose the neck is surrounded by multiple necklaces of coral beads. Her high curved hairstyle was also made up of a mesh of pearls falling on either side of the face. Black patina, abrasions.
After the birth of the future king, the queen was "removed" from power and could no longer father. But at the end of the 15th century the Oba Esigie refused to conform to this practice and wanted to attribute the city of Uselu to his mother. She also received a palace and many privileges. In recognition she raised an army to go and fight the Igala of the North. The Oba cast a head in his effigy, among many works cast in lost wax, to place them ...


View details

380.00  304.00

Dogon horseman
Sold item
African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Dogon horseman

Bronze sculpture depicting a mythical horseman, ancestor or Dogon religious leader. Pale green patina.
The frequent representations of riders among the Dogon of Mali refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos, ancestors of men, resuscitated by the creator god Amma, descended to earth carried by an ark transformed into a horse. In addition, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious leader named Hogon, paraded on his mount during his enthronement because according to custom he was not to set foot on the ground. In the region of the cliffs of Sangha, inaccessible on horseback, the priests wore it, while neighing in reference to the mythical ancestor Nommo.
Dogon blacksmiths form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called ...


View details

Sold

Emblems
promo art africain
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Emblems

These sticks with a figurative pattern forming the Edan were worn as a pendant around the neck by members of the Ogboni society. Smooth khaki patina.
Height on base: 27 cm.
The Ogboni or Oshugbo secret society is one of the most famous Yoruba religious worship societies. Some have suggested that the feminine and masculine representations could allude to the sky as a male entity and to the earth symbolizing femininity, or to the founding couple of human society. Although some Ogboni works are made of wood, terracotta, or ivory, the majority are made of iron-reinforced brass, which has a connection with Osun, the goddess of the river and fertility. Iron is also sacred to Osun, god of tools and weapons. The Ogboni expression, "Ogbodirin" means "Grow old and still be as strong as ...


View details

380.00  304.00

Bronze head
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze head

In African art, the artistic current of which these sculptures belong is named after the ancient religious capital of Nigeria, Ifè, one of the many city-states established by the Yoruba.This civilization succeeded the Nok civilization. This city-state of Ilé-Ifé, whose growth culminated from the 12th to the 15th century, had an artistic tradition of realistic royal portraits, bronze and terracotta funerary effigies. The parallel folds drawn on the neck would evoke the folds of flesh of the prosperous notables, and the hollowed-out parts that accompany it were to be used to secure the king's beaded veil. The parallel lines of the face are traditional scarifications. The holes around the mouth likely symbolized a beard created by the insertion of hair or beads.
The bronze heads were ...


View details

Sold

Bénin head
Sold item
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Bénin head

African art from Benin is described as court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as the Oba. The tradition of bronze court objects in the Benin kingdom dates back to the 14th century. The many bronze alloy heads and statues created by Benin artists were reserved for the exclusive use of the inhabitants of the royal palace and, more often than not, placed on altars consecrated by each new Oba. These rectangular altars were topped with heads, statues, carved ivory tusks, bells and sticks. They were used to commemorate an oba and to make contact with his spirit. This late sculpture, reminiscent of those made at the death of the queen, depicts a queen mother of Benin named the Iyoba, whose neck is encircled with multiple coral bead necklaces. Her high headdress also ...


View details

Sold

Dogon bronze
Sold item
African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Dogon bronze

The frequent representations of riders among the Dogon of Mali refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos, ancestors of men, resurrected by the creator god Amma, descended to earth carried by an ark transformed into a horse. In addition, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious leader named Hogon, paraded on his mount during his enthronement because according to custom he was not to set foot on the ground. In the region of the cliffs of Sangha, inaccessible on horseback, the priests wore it, while neighing in reference to the mythical ancestor Nommo.
The 1931 Dakar-Djibouti mission, led by Marcel Griaule, was tasked with studying in depth the rites of this population established in the region of the Bandiagara cliffs, to ...


View details

Sold

Benin bronze
promo art africain
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Benin bronze

This sculpture depicting a Portuguese soldier, made using the lost wax casting process, has a blaster. Richly dressed, he wears a traditional tunic, hip dagger, helmet, and anklets. Shaded gray patina. The Portuguese arrived in Benin in the 15th century, equipped with a military arsenal which aroused great interest among the kings. The power of firearms was then naturally associated with the capacity for occult defense against invisible enemies. In the 16th century, Europeans played a major role in the court of the Oba: they imported corals and glass beads there, as well as shackles, highly coveted by the king and his courtiers.
At the same time, their soldiers took part in the military campaigns of Benin, in particular against the kingdom of Idah. The character's blaster therefore ...


View details

780.00  624.00

Lobi bronze
promo art africain
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Lobi bronze

Ex-Belgian African art collection
Slender character wearing a traditional hairstyle, a necklace-talisman, and a cache-sex. Beautiful velvety khaki gray patina.
The populations of the same cultural region, grouped together under the name "lobi", form a fifth of the inhabitants of Burkina Faso. Few in number in Ghana, they have also settled in the north of Côte d'Ivoire. It was at the end of the 18th century that the Lobi, coming from North Ghana, established themselves among the indigenous Thuna and Puguli, the Dagara, the Dian, the Gan and the Birifor. The Lobi believe in a Creator God named Thangba Thu, whom they address through the worship of many intermediary spirits, the Thil, these the latter being supposed to protect them, with the help of the diviner, against a host of ...


View details

180.00  144.00

Bamoun necklace
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bamoun necklace

The African art of the Bamoun, and the regalia associated with sovereignty. This Bamoun dignitary necklace, or Bamoum, is adorned with 13 heads arranged on a metal strapping. This iconography symbolizes royalty. When they sit, the members of the court council of Sultan Bamoun wear this distinctive adornment of their office, the mbangba , "mgba-mgba", which contributes according to them to strengthen their prestige and ward off any evil power. Among the Bamoun, it is the fon , the head of the Kingdom or the chiefdom, who will offer this necklace to deserving men.
Total height on base: 56 cm.

The Bamoun live in a region that is both full of wooded landforms but also of savannas. This large territory called Grassland located in the southwest of Cameroon is also the seat ...


View details

Sold

Dogon bronze
Sold item
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon bronze

Dogon blacksmith artists form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim. Nowadays they produce weapons, tools, and also work with wood. "Masters of fire", they are also supposed to heal burns (Huib Blom). The Nommo, protective ancestor evoked in different forms in Dogon iconography, would be an ancestor endowed with the ability to manifest himself in human or animal form, hence the frequent decorative motifs adorning the sculptures. The wavelet friezes are also symbolic. This is a piece of rare elegance, the ovoid container resting on the shape of a scorpion, the lid bears a hornbill figure. Khaki green patina.
The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, their myths and their rituals. Their population is estimated at around 300,000 souls living in the south-west of ...


View details

Sold

Kongo bronze
promo art africain
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Kongo bronze

This small anthropomorphic sculpture of Kongo inspiration takes up the canons of personal fetishes with a protective purpose. The kneeling figure could represent a slave destined for sacrifice.
The Vili , the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the Kôngo group, led by the king ntotela . Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory and copper trade and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary with a codified gesture related to their worldview.
The witch doctors nganga , both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God called Nzambi through consecrated figures. To this end, individual protective figures nkisis, to protect ...


View details

245.00  196.00

Senufo ring
Sold item
African art > Jewelry, ornament > Senufo ring

This ring is a symbol of prestige, copper being a sacred metal, and its animal motifs recall the Senufo genesis. Named "ring of silence", probably by virtue of the secrecy to which the initiates are subjected, it was sometimes worn on the left hand, sometimes held between the teeth by healers during ceremonies with a therapeutic aim. Total height on base (removable ring) : 8 cm. Mainly farmers, the Senoufo group lives in a savannah region that covers the south of Mali and Burkina Faso, and the north of the Ivory Coast. It includes about fifty sub-ethnic groups. The Senufo speak a Voltaic language, Gur, like the Lobi and Koulango. If among the five groups of Senoufo artisans the kulibèlé are sculptors, the fonombèlé are both smiths and sculptors, claiming to be directly inspired ...


View details

Sold





Previously viewed items
African art  -  New York - Paris - London

© 2022 - Digital Consult SPRL

Essentiel Galerie SPRL
73A Rue de Tournai - 7333 Tertre - Belgique
+32 (0)65.529.100
visa Master CardPaypal