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African art - Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues:

In African art, one finds a multitude of bronze objects made in the purest animist tradition by the village blacksmiths. Nigeria, thanks to the Benin and Ife kingdoms, was a major producer of bronze objects. The statues, heads and everyday objects made of bronze are of superb workmanship thanks to the use of the lost wax process which consists of creating a massive model in clay. This is covered with a layer of wax and metal rods are added. Then we cover the whole with refractory clay leaving a hole in the upper part. When it is dry, it is heated, which melts the wax inside, and then the bronze is poured in. Finally there is only to break the clay inside to recover the bronze object.


Benin head
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Benin head

The African art of Benin is described as court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as the Oba. The tradition of bronze court objects from the Benin Kingdom dates back to the 14th century. The palace altars were topped with heads, statues, carved ivory tusks, bells and staves. They were used to commemorate an oba and to get in touch with his spirit. This late sculpture, reminiscent of those made when the queen died, features a queen mother of Benin named the Iyoba, whose neck is encircled with multiple necklaces of coral beads. Her high hairstyle was also made up of a mesh of pearls falling on either side of her face. After the birth of the future king, the queen was "removed" from power and could no longer father. But at the end of the 15th century the Oba Esigie ...


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Benin bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Benin bronze

Before the destruction of the palace of the kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. War scenes were reproduced on narrative plaques, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, heavy bracelets, anklets and recades were produced in quantity in many foundry workshops using the lost wax casting technique.
The killing of the king of animals associated with legends, the leopard, was the privilege of the chief, the Oba. The feline could then serve as an offering for the cult of the chief's head. Sometimes tamed by various royal guilds, it accompanied the leader on his travels. The Oba, named "child of the leopard of the house", could also ...


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120.00

Dogon bronze
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon bronze

Bronze representing mythical characters in a canoe. The whole evokes the complex beliefs of the Dogon. The animal motif is also associated with the animals of creation. Verdigris patina.
Dogon blacksmiths form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim. They now produce weapons, tools, and also work with wood. "Masters of fire" associated in the Dogon cosmogony with the primordial beings "Nommo" created by the god Ama, they are also supposed to heal burns. Small metal objects, made using the lost-wax technique, were widespread in the Inner Niger Delta region, with copper reaching it through trans-Saharan trade. The Nommo, protective ancestor evoked in different forms in Dogon iconography, would be an ancestor endowed with the ability to manifest himself in human or animal ...


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Bamoun Bronze
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bamoun Bronze

The African art of the Bamoun, and the regalia, emblems of prestige associated with sovereignty.
This Bamoun dignitary necklace, or Bamoum, is adorned with 12 buffalo heads arranged on a metal hoop. This iconography symbolizes values of combativeness and tenacity. When they sit, the members of the council of the court of the Sultan Bamoun wear this distinctive ornament of their function,the mbangba, "mgba-mgba", which they believe helps to strengthen their prestige and keep away any evil power. Among the Bamoun, it is the fon , the head of the kingdom or chiefdom, who will offer this necklace to deserving men.

The Bamoun inhabit a region that is both full of wooded relief but also savannah. This large territory called Grassland located in the southwest of Cameroon ...


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Bronze Dogon
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze Dogon

These haughty African sculptures embody the primordial couple Nommos at the origin of creation among the Dogon of Mali. Evoking the sculptures of Giacometti, these bronze statues with slender bodies are punctuated by a succession of notches.
Light brown patina.
The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, their esotericism, their myths and legends. Their population is estimated at around 300,000 souls living in the south-west of the Niger loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (north-west of Ouahigouya ). The villages are often perched on top of the scree on the side of the hills, according to a unique architecture. The history of Dogon migrations and settlements (about ten main groups, about fifteen ...


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480.00

New product
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > New product

The palatial tribal art of Benin.Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. War scenes were reproduced on narrative plates, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chefs, heavy bracelets, hairs and recades were produced in quantity in many workshops of smelters according to the technique of cast iron with lost wax. The killing of the king of animals associated with the legends, the leopard, was the privilege of the chief, the Oba. The feline could then serve as an offering for the worship of the chief's head. Sometimes tamed by various royal guilds, he accompanied the chief on his travels. The Oba, named " ...


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Bamileke necklace
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bamileke necklace

The African art of the Bamoun, and the regalia associated with sovereignty.
This old necklace of Bamoun dignitary, or Bamoum, is trimmed with 12 buffalo heads arranged on a metal strap with a clasp. This iconography symbolizes the values of combativeness and tenacity. When they sit, the members of sultan Bamoun's court council wear this distinctive adornment of their function, the mbangba ,"mgba-mgba", which they say helps to strengthen their prestige and drive away any power Evil. Among the Bamoun, it is the fon, the head of the Kingdom or the chiefdom, who will offer this necklace to deserving men.
Total height on a base: 55 cm.

The Bamoun live in an area full of woodlands as well as savannahs. This large territory called Grassland in southwestern Cameroon is ...


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Tête Ifé
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Tête Ifé

Figurative bronzes in the African art of ancient Yoruba civilizations
The city of Ifé in Nigeria was in the 15th century the center of a powerful forest state west of the Niger Delta. The work of bronze was a prerogative of King "oni", according to the technique of lost wax. These prestigious objects embodying the sovereigns were placed on the royal altars for ceremonial use. This commemorative sculpture in the naturalistic style depicts a royal figure proudly wearing a very crafted helmet. The vertical streaks on his face evoke the traditional scarifications of the ethnic group named after Nigeria's former religious capital, Ifè. This bronze head is inspired by those produced by the sculptors of Ilé-Ifé and testifies to their great skill in the treatment of faces. He is said to have ...


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Dogon bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon bronze

Small anecdotal statuette describing a character carrying an ax and a bundle of wood. This statuette with many details is coated with a black patina encrusted with clear deposits.
Dogon blacksmiths form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim. They now produce weapons, tools, and also work with wood. "Masters of fire" associated in the Dogon cosmogony with the primordial beings "Nommo" created by the god Ama, they are also supposed to heal burns. Small metal objects, made using the lost-wax technique, were widespread in the Inner Niger Delta region, with copper reaching it through trans-Saharan trade. Excavations on the Bandiagara plateau have in fact brought to light vestiges of iron and steel sites prior to the 15th century, the date of the arrival of the Dogon. The ...


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180.00

Lobi couple
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Lobi couple

Couple depicted standing. The graceful elongation of the neck contrasts with the full busts of these naked figures, simply adorned with jewelry.
Khaki brown patina.
Flat bases: 8/8 cm.
The populations of the same cultural region, grouped under the name "Lobi", make up one fifth of the inhabitants of Burkina Faso. They are not very numerous in Ghana, but have also settled in the north of the Ivory Coast. It was at the end of the eighteenth century that the Lobi , coming from northern Ghana, settled among the indigenous Thuna and Puguli, the Dagara , the Dian , the Gan and the Birifor . The Lobi believe in a creator God named Thangba Thu, to whom they turn through the worship of numerous intermediate spirits, the Thil, the latter being supposed to protect them, ...


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Mambila bronze
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Mambila bronze

This bronze sculpture, placed here on a metal ring, evokes the monoliths, architectural stone constructions, of the Cameroonian Grasslands region. These commemorative stelae were made primarily for religious and funerary purposes. It is also reminiscent, in its design and decorative motifs related to tribal ritual markings, of the funerary stones atals of the Bakor, and Ekoi, of the neighboring Grasslands regions around the Cross River in Nigeria. The bronze depicts a figure, ancestor or mythical hero, wearing a notable headdress. The representation of the protruding umbilicus insists on the filiation. Despite their small numbers, the thirty thousand Mambila (or Mambilla, Mambere, Nor, Torbi, Lagubi, Tagbo, Tongbo, Bang, Ble, Juli, Bea)(the "men", in Fulani), settled in the northwest ...


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Yoruba Bronze
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Yoruba Bronze

Metaphor of royal power in African art from the Benin Kingdom.
Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works, mainly bronze sculptures, celebrating their power. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, majestic felines, heavy bracelets, anklets and recades were produced in quantity in numerous foundry workshops using the lost wax casting technique. Placed on the altar dedicated to the queen mother from the 16th century in Benin City in Nigeria, the bronze depicting a rooster, Okpa, glorified royal power with its haughty appearance. This type of sculpture has a finely striated surface evoking the plumage of the bird. The animal is represented perched on a ...


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Dogon bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon bronze

Longiform silhouettes, erected on a base, depicting the primordial ancestors of the Dogon. These African Dogon statues, in bronze, indeed evoke the Nommos, mythical beings at the origin of creation among the Dogon of Mali. Also reminiscent of the sculptures of the famous Giacometti, they are represented in the position of invocation, arms raised towards the sky. Their surface is punctuated by a succession of notches. Orange-brown patina.

The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, their esotericism, their myths and legends. Their population is estimated at around 300,000 souls living in the south-west of the Niger loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (north-west of Ouahigouya ). The villages are ...


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480.00

Benin Plate
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Benin Plate

Ex-collection French African art.
Before the destruction of the palace of the Kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of kings, the Oba , was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. In African tribal art, glorifying war scenes were reproduced on narrative plates, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chefs, majestic felines, heavy bracelets, hairs and recades were produced in quantity in many workshops of smelters according to the technique of cast iron with lost wax. During the 16th century, oba Esigie commissioned the first copper alloy plates with embossed ornamentation. Many of them were cast in pairs to symmetrically decorate the pillars or walls of the palace. Olfert Dapper describes these plaques ...


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1995.00

Benin rider
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Benin rider

Benin African art is described as court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as Oba. The tradition of bronze court objects from the Benin Kingdom dates back to the 14th century. The many brass heads and statues created by the artists of Benin were reserved for the exclusive use of the inhabitants of the royal palace and, more often than not, placed on altars consecrated by each new Oba. These rectangular altars were surmounted by heads, statues, carved ivory tusks, bells and staves. They were used to commemorate an oba and to get in touch with his spirit. The craftsmen of Benin also produced figures of riders on horseback, representing according to the interpretations, either a Benin king, or a Yoruba emissary of the cavalry of Oyo. It could also be Oranmiyan, who ...


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650.00

Bénin Head
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bénin Head

This late African bronze, made from a work that was made on the death of the queen, depicts a queen mother of Benin named the Iyoba, whose neck is surrounded by multiple necklaces of coral beads. Her high curved hairstyle was also made up of a mesh of pearls falling on either side of the face. After the birth of the future king, the queen was "removed" from power and could no longer father. But at the end of the 15th century the Oba Esigie refused to conform to this practice and wanted to attribute the city of Uselu to his mother. She also received a palace and many privileges. In recognition she raised an army to go and fight the Igala of the North. The Oba cast a head in his effigy, among many works cast in lost wax, to place them on his altar after his death.


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650.00

Verre bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Verre bronze

African statuette in bronze alloy representing a character whose body seems to bend under the weight of the children held around his bust. The ears are traditionally distended. The statuette also bears concentric scarifications.
Golden patina, residual dark inlays.

The Vere , Verre , Were, Duru-Verre, or Dii, live in northeastern Nigeria, in the state of Adamawa (formerly Gongola), and in northern Cameroon. This very small population lives in circular huts grouped together in fortified villages.
The Vere statuettes, whose function remains unknown, are rare, and present analogies with the works produced by the Mumuye, their close neighbors established between Nigeria and Cameroon.


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340.00

Head Benin
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Head Benin

The African art of Benin is described as a court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as Oba. The tradition of bronze classroom objects from the Benin Kingdom dates back to the 14th century. The many bronze alloy heads and statues created by the artists of Benin were reserved for the exclusive use of the inhabitants of the royal palace and, more often than not, placed on altars consecrated by each new Oba. These rectangular altars were surmounted by heads, statues, carved ivory tusks, bells and sticks. They were used to commemorate an oba and to get in touch with his spirit. This late sculpture, which was made on the death of the Queen, depicts a queen mother of Benin named the Iyoba , whose neck is surrounded by multiple necklaces of coral beads. Her high curved ...


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Benin Bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Benin Bronze

Benign plaque, depicting the Oba flanked by armed warriors. Verdigris patina revealing the metal locally.
Before the destruction of the palace of the kingdom of Benin in 1897, the divine character of the kings, the Oba, was illustrated by multiple works celebrating their power. In African tribal art, war scenes glorifying them were reproduced on narrative plaques, in bronze, and affixed to the walls. Sumptuous bronze altars, commemorative figures of deceased chiefs, majestic felines, heavy bracelets, anklets and recades were produced in quantity in numerous foundry workshops using the lost wax casting technique. During the 16th century, the Oba Esigie commissioned the first copper alloy plates with relief ornamentation. Many of them were cast in pairs in order to symmetrically ...


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350.00

Dogon bronze
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon bronze

These haughty figures embody the primordial couple Nommos at the origin of creation among the Dogon of Mali. Evoking the sculptures of Giacometti, these bronze statues are hammered with a succession of notches, punctuating the slender bodies.
The Dogon are a people renowned for their cosmogony, their esotericism, their myths and legends. Their population is estimated at around 300,000 souls living in the south-west of the Niger loop in the Mopti region of Mali (Bandiagara, Koro, Banka), near Douentza and part of northern Burkina (north-west of Ouahigouya ). The villages are often perched on top of the scree on the side of the hills, according to a unique architecture. The history of Dogon migrations and settlements (about ten main groups, about fifteen different languages) ...


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Lobi bronze
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Lobi bronze

Seated couple, each with traditional headdress and a necklace-talisman. Velvety khaki patina. The populations of the same cultural region, grouped under the name "Lobi", make up one fifth of the inhabitants of Burkina Faso. Although they are not very numerous in Ghana, they have also settled in the north of the Ivory Coast. It was at the end of the eighteenth century that the Lobi , coming from northern Ghana, settled among the indigenous Thuna and Puguli, the Dagara , the Dian , the Gan and the Birifor . The Lobi believe in a creator God named Thangba Thu, to whom they turn through the worship of numerous intermediate spirits, the Thil, the latter being supposed to protect them, with the help of the diviner, against a host of plagues. Geniuses of the bush, red-haired beings called ...


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