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African art - Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues:

In African art, one finds a multitude of bronze objects made in the purest animist tradition by the village blacksmiths. Nigeria, thanks to the Benin and Ife kingdoms, was a major producer of bronze objects. The statues, heads and everyday objects made of bronze are of superb workmanship thanks to the use of the lost wax process which consists of creating a massive model in clay. This is covered with a layer of wax and metal rods are added. Then we cover the whole with refractory clay leaving a hole in the upper part. When it is dry, it is heated, which melts the wax inside, and then the bronze is poured in. Finally there is only to break the clay inside to recover the bronze object.


Lobi sculpture in bronze
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Lobi bronze

Couple figured back to back, symbolizing complementarity. Khaki brown patina, golden highlights. Populations from the same cultural region, grouped under the name "lobi," make up one-fifth of the inhabitants of Burkina Faso. Not very numerous in Ghana, they also settled in the north of Côte d'Ivoire. It was at the end of the eighteenth century that the Lobi , coming from northern Ghana, settled among the indigenous Thuna and Puguli, the Dagara, Dian, Gan, and Birifor.


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Dogon ceremonial hair pin
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon Pin

Jan Putteneers African Art Collection for sale.

This dogon sculpture, a traditional figurative jewel, adorned with a zoomorphic subject, accompanied the ceremonial dress of religious leaders hogon responsible for the cult of the lebed, the mythical snake, and the priests of Binou. Small metal objects fashioned using the lost wax technique were widespread in the interior delta region of Niger, with copper being made possible by trans-Saharan trade. Excavations on the Bandiagara plateau have uncovered remains of steel sites prior to the 15th century, when the Dogons arrived. Blacksmiths form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim. They now produce weapons, tools, and also work wood. They are also believed to be associated with the primordial beings of the god Ama, ...


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Royal equestrian figure Bini Edo Benin
African art > Bronze rider, wooden rider, dogon, yoruba > Benin rider

African art from Benin is described as court art because it is closely associated with the king, known as the Oba. The tradition of bronze court objects in the Benin kingdom dates back to the 14th century. The many brass heads and statues created by Benin artists were reserved for the exclusive use of the inhabitants of the royal palace and, more often than not, placed on altars consecrated by each new Oba. These rectangular altars were topped with heads, statues, carved ivory tusks, bells and sticks. They were used to commemorate an oba and to contact his spirit. Beninese artisans also produced figures of horsemen on horseback, representing either a Beninese king or a Yoruba emissary of the Oyo cavalry, depending on interpretation. It could also be Oranmiyan, who imported horses to ...

Bronze Dogon Rider
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Statue Dogon

Image of the rider in The African Art Dogon
This rider figure would represent a Dogon warrior with his spear. The stylized horse is pitched up and has stretched legs. The sculpture is provided with many details, executed meticulously, such as engraved decorative motifs. Ex. collection of the painter 'a href'"http://wiki.ibb.town/Karl-Heinz-Engstfeld"- Karl Heinz Engstfeld and 'a href-U'0022https://evibb.de/home/wir-trauern-um-ruth-engstfeld-schremper/"-Ruth Schgst , a gandher artist. The frequent representations of a rider, among the Dogon of Mali, refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos, ancestors of men, resurrected by the creator god Amma, descended on the earth carried by an arch transformed into a horse. Moreover, the highest ...


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Horseman Dogon in bronze
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze Dogon

The frequent representations of the rider, among the Dogon of Mali, refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos, ancestors of men, resurrected by the creator god Amma, descended on the earth carried by an arch transformed into a horse. Moreover, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious leader named Hogon, paraded on his mount during his induction because it was customary for him not to set foot on the ground. In the region of the cliffs of Sangha, inaccessible on horseback, the priests wore it, while whining in reference to the mythical ancestor Nommo. The Dakar-Djibouti mission of 1931, led by Marcel Griaule, was tasked with studying in depth the rites of this population established in the Groupiagara Cliffs region, southwest of ...


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Bamoun Mgba-Mgba induction necklace
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bamoun Bronze

The African art of the Bamoun, and the regalia, emblems of prestige associated with sovereignty.
This Bamoun dignitary necklace, or Bamoum, is adorned with 12 buffalo heads arranged on a metal hoop. This iconography symbolizes values of combativeness and tenacity. When they sit, the members of the council of the court of the Sultan Bamoun wear this distinctive ornament of their function,the mbangba, "mgba-mgba", which they believe helps to strengthen their prestige and keep away any evil power. Among the Bamoun, it is the fon , the head of the kingdom or chiefdom, who will offer this necklace to deserving men.

The Bamoun inhabit a region that is both full of wooded relief but also savannah. This large territory called Grassland located in the southwest of Cameroon ...

Dogon horseman statue in bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon bronze

Delicate bonzier work for this ancient figure of a Dogon horseman featuring a character, the hogon, equipped with his stick, and riding bareback. Ritual ochre patina. The frequent representations of horsemen among the Dogon of Mali refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos, ancestors of men, resurrected by the creator god Amma, came down to earth carried by an ark metamorphosed into a horse. Moreover, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious chief named Hogon, paraded on his horse during his enthronement because according to the custom he should not put his foot on the ground. In the region of the Sangha cliffs, inaccessible by horse, the priests carried him, neighing in reference to the mythical ancestor Nommo. Dogon ...


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360.00

Dogon canoe in bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon brons

Dogon miniature in bronze, of great finesse, representing mythical characters in a pirogue. The whole evokes the complex beliefs of the Dogon. The animal motif, a saurine in this case, also refers to the animals of creation. Grey-green patina. Dogon blacksmiths form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim. Today they produce weapons, tools,and also work with wood. "Masters of fire" associated in Dogon cosmogony with the primordial beings "Nommo" created by the god Ama, they are also supposed to cure burns. Small metal objects, made using the lost wax technique, were widespread in the region of the interior delta of the Niger, copper reaching it thanks to the trans-Saharan trade. Excavations on the Bandiagara plateau have uncovered the remains of iron and steel sites dating back ...


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290.00

Dogon figure
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon bronze

Dogon statuette made of bronze, representing a kneeling woman whose arms extend from her shoulders to her breasts. The linear lines of the body are associated with traditional scarification.
The Dogon blacksmiths form an endogamous caste among the Dogon called irim. Today they produce weapons, tools,and also work with wood. "Masters of fire" associated in Dogon cosmogony with the primordial beings "Nommo" created by the god Ama, they are also supposed to cure burns. Small metal objects, made using the lost wax technique, were widespread in the region of the interior delta of the Niger, copper reaching it thanks to the trans-Saharan trade. Excavations on the Bandiagara plateau have uncovered the remains of iron and steel sites dating back to the 15th century, the date of the ...


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250.00

Bronze Kongo statuette
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Statuette Congo

This small anthropomorphic sculpture, of kisi type, takes in miniature the canons of the Kongo statuary, and in particular the funerary statues inyongo or mintadi of lower Zaire, which were made of stone. These figures form the vital embodiment of a spirit or ancestor. Comes with plexi base.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the group Kôngo , led by King ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory, copper and slave trade. Similarly, beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary with a codified gesture in relation to their worldview. The sorcerers nganga, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the God called Nzambi by the help of consecrated figures. To ...


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245.00

Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji rider
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao bronze

In African art, Sao Sokoto inspired works are mostly marked by the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen, generally made of bronze, are cast and worn as talismans, with a patina and a lustrous finish. They are considered above all as a remedy against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie that possesses him is symbolized by the rider. Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the northwest of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now disappeared. They were found ...


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40.00

Sao Sokoto rider
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao rider

This bronze has a coppery patina. The warrior represented on his mount has his head wrapped in a chêche identical to those of the Tuaregs.

In African art, works of Sao Sokoto inspiration are mostly marked by the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen, generally in bronze, are cast and worn as talismans, patinated and polished by rubbing. They are considered above all as a remedy against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie that possesses him is symbolized by the rider. Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the North-West of Cameroon where they mixed with the ...


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80.00

Bronze Kongo statuette
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Statuette Congo

This small anthropomorphic sculpture, made of bronze, takes in miniature the canons of the Kongo statuary, and in particular the funerary statues inyongo or mintadi of lower Zaire, which were made of stone and represented various themes thanks to characters frozen in various attitudes. These figures form the vital embodiment of a spirit or ancestor. 
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the group Kôngo , led by King ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory, copper and slave trade. Similarly, beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary with a codified gesture in relation to their worldview. The sorcerers nganga, both healers, were in charge of religious activities and mediation towards the ...


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245.00

Mambila bronze bust
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Mambila bronze

This bronze sculpture, placed here on a metal ring, evokes the monoliths, architectural stone constructions, of the Cameroonian Grasslands region. These commemorative stelae were made primarily for religious and funerary purposes. It is also reminiscent, in its design and decorative motifs related to tribal ritual markings, of the funerary stones atals of the Bakor, and Ekoi, of the neighboring Grasslands regions around the Cross River in Nigeria. The bronze depicts a figure, ancestor or mythical hero, wearing a notable headdress. The representation of the protruding umbilicus insists on the filiation. Despite their small numbers, the thirty thousand Mambila (or Mambilla, Mambere, Nor, Torbi, Lagubi, Tagbo, Tongbo, Bang, Ble, Juli, Bea)(the "men", in Fulani), settled in the northwest ...


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450.00

Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji rider
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao bronze

In African art, Sao Sokoto inspired works are mostly marked by the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen, generally made of bronze, are cast and worn as talismans, with a patina and a lustrous finish. They are considered above all as a remedy against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie that possesses them is symbolized by the rider.
Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the northwest of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now disappeared. They ...

Gan Torfan bronze
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Gan bronze

The Torfan , metal objects melted by the blacksmith gan through the lost wax technique, form an accessory intended for divination and protection of the group. They are the property of healers, diviners and priests. The torfan embodies a mythical animal whose bite was neutralized and cured, following the making of a metal talisman. Many gan objects thus take up this iconography of the serpent, endowed with several heads according to its power.

Neighboring people of the Lobi in southwestern Burkina Faso, the Gan or Kaa (Kaaba pl.), form a "relic people" according to Madeleine Père, living within a wooded savanna. Their king "Gan Massa" is elected by the notables from different villages. Hypotheses diverge as to their origins. According to some, they could be of Akan ...


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Sao Sokoto Putchu Guinadji rider
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Sao bronze

In African art, Sao Sokoto inspired works are mostly marked by the equestrian world. Within the ethnic group, small examples of horsemen, generally made of bronze, are cast and worn as talismans, with a patina and a lustrous finish. They are considered above all as a remedy against possession by evil spirits. The horse represents the spirit of the person who is possessed, while the genie that possesses them is symbolized by the rider.
Subjected to successive assaults by their neighbors from Kanem and then by hordes from the East, the Sao had to abandon their lands to settle in the northwest of Cameroon where they mixed with the natives, thus giving birth to an ethnic group called Kotoko. More than an ethnic group, the Sao are a civilization that has now disappeared. They ...

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Statuette Vere, Duru, in bronze alloy
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Vere bronze

This rare statuette depicting an androgynous being with strangely webbed feet and hands offers a face with prominent features, characterized by bulbous eyelids, pointed, horizontal ears, and a sagittal crest. The body is adorned with linear scarifications in checkerboard pattern originating from the neck. The latter is outlined with a torque, while a belt marks the hips and ankle rings the legs.
The Vere , Verre , Were, Duru-Verre, or Dii, live in northeastern Nigeria, in the state of Adamawa (formerly Gongola), and in northern Cameroon. This very small population lives in circular huts grouped in fortified villages.
The Vere statuettes, whose function remains unknown, are rare, and present analogies with the works produced by the Mumuye, their close neighbors ...

Bronze Kongo statuette
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Bronze Congo

Ex-collection French African art.
This small anthropomorphic sculpture, made of bronze, takes in miniature the canons of the Kongo statuary, especially the funerary statues inyongo or mintadi of lower Zaire, which were made of stone and represented various themes thanks to characters frozen in various attitudes. These figures form the vital embodiment of a spirit or ancestor. 
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo formed the group Kôngo , led by King ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the ivory, copper and slave trade. Similarly, beliefs and traditions, they produced a statuary with a codified gesture in relation to their worldview. The sorcerers nganga, both healers, were in charge of religious ...


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Large bronze Gan pendant
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African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Gan bronze

The gan bronzes, metal objects melted by the blacksmith using the lost wax technique, form individual protective fetishes. They embody a sacred mythical animal whose role was crucial for man, and are available in the motifs of the turtle, chameleon, crocodile or panther. Some, composing the royal regalia, were placed in shrines.

This flat, circular pendant, a prestigious piece of jewelry intended for a dignitary on important occasions, depicts a chameleon coiled around itself, around a striated spiral element. The body is decorated with friezes in broken lines. Light brown golden patina. Neighboring people of the Lobi in southwestern Burkina Faso, the Gan or Kaa (Kaaba pl.), form a "relic people" according to Madeleine Père, living within a wooded savanna. Their king ...


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Dogon horseman figure in bronze
African art > Bronze, leopard, messenger, warrior, statue, pirogues > Dogon rider

This statuette represents a horsewoman, carrying a spear. Brown patina with residual ochre inlays. The frequent representations of horsemen among the Dogon of Mali refer to their cosmogony and their complex religious myths. Indeed, one of the Nommos, ancestors of the men, resuscitated by the creator god Amma, came down on the earth carried by an ark metamorphosed into a horse. Moreover, the highest authority of the Dogon people, the religious chief named Hogon, paraded on his horse during his enthronement because according to the custom he should not put his foot on the ground. In the region of the Sangha cliffs, inaccessible by horse, the priests carried him, neighing in reference to the mythical ancestor Nommo.
The Dogon blacksmiths form an endogamous caste among the Dogon ...


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280.00





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