...
Search option




Discover our exceptionnal items

African art - Dolls:

Many contemporary commentaries claim that dolls and puppets were introduced to the African continent by the Catholic missions for didactic purposes. However, it is clear that the ancestral tradition of puppet show existed long before the arrival of the missions. African puppets are predominantly used in men's shows, while dolls are used by girls and women.


Yoruba statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba statuette

Ex-British collection of African art African statuette decorated with necklaces of colored beads constituting the protective abiku adornments.
Sculpted according to the instructions of Ifa transmitted to the diviner, the babalawo, the Ibedji statuettes played the role of substitute for the death of the child. The statuettes are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of it; she anoints them with oil and feeds them regularly. If it disappears, the remaining twin takes over. Considered to be much more than a physical representation of a loved one. The Ibedji statues influence the life of the family, which is why the latter continues to pray to them and offer them worship and libations.
Mahogany satin patina, drying cracks..


View details

250.00

Tabwa Doll
African art > African Dolls > Tabwa Doll

Ex-Belgian collection of African art traditional dolls in African tribal art of the Tabwa. Used by the female initiation society, this statuette has feminine attributes and a protruding navel, scarifications comparable to those of members of the tribe. Golden brown patina.
The Tabwa ("scarify" and "write") constitute an ethnic group present in the South-East of the DRC. Simple farmers without centralized power, they united around tribal chiefs after having been influenced by the Luba. It was mainly during this period that their artistic movement was expressed mainly through statues but also masks. The Tabwa practiced ancestor worship and dedicated some of their statues to them called mkisi. Animists, their beliefs are anchored around ngulu, spirits of nature present in plants ...


View details

180.00

Akuaba doll
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Akuaba doll

Belgian collection of African tribal art Used among the Ashanti and Fantis of Ghana, theAkuaba doll statuettes (plural Akua'mma) are amulets used by Ashanti women to promote fertility. They are easily identifiable thanks to their stylized appearance. Their flat, circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part, the features are generally drawn in the lower third of the head. A mark of beauty, the ringed neck also symbolizes prosperity. Carried on the backs of women, these statues are also accompanied by various rites, such as the ingestion of a potion, or the placement of the object on the family altar. After the birth of the child, the sculpture is used as a toy, and sometimes still offered to the healer in order to witness its effectiveness. Smooth speckled patina, brown ...


View details

240.00

Mossi doll
African art > African Dolls > Mossi doll

Ex-French collection of African tribal art Schematized fertility doll, whose head appearance varies depending on the region. The angular head evokes the female crest hairstyle, the parallel incisions, the scarifications and the braids of the ethnic group.
Beautiful lustrous patina.
Among many ethnic groups, the search for fertility is done through initiation rites. Wooden figures will be carved, some reflecting both genders, in many cases covered with beads and clothing. During the period of seclusion, the doll, which becomes a child who requires daily feeding, washing and anointing, becomes the girl's only companion. After the initiation, they will be carried on the women's backs, or attached to their necks. Wooden dolls (biiga), carved in their free time by blacksmiths in ...


View details

150.00

Tabwa doll
African art > African Dolls > Tabwa doll

French collection of African art .
Small sculpted figure with feminine attributes and a protruding navel, it bears multiple scarifications. Glossy brown patina, erosions from use.
The Tabwa ("scarify" and "write") are an ethnic group present in the South-East of the DRC. Simple farmers without centralized power, they united around tribal chiefs after being influenced by the Luba. The tribes of this region, such as the Tumbwe , worship the mipasi ancestors through sculptures held by the chiefs or sorcerers. The Tabwa practiced ancestor worship and dedicated some of their statues called mkisi to them. Animists, their beliefs are anchored around the ngulu, nature spirits present in plants and rocks.


View details

380.00

Mossi Doll
African art > African Dolls > Mossi Doll

This schematic sculpture, whose appearance of the head varies depending on the region, represents a spirit with whom a relationship is established. The element falling in front of the face evokes the braid worn by little girls, the incisions and scarifications of the ethnic group. Glossy dark patina.
Among many ethnic groups, the search for fertility is done through initiation rites. Wooden figures will be carved, some reflecting both genders, in many cases covered with beads and clothing. During the period of seclusion, the doll, which becomes a child who requires to be fed, washed and anointed daily, becomes the girl's only companion. After the initiation, they will be carried on the women's backs, or attached to their necks. Wooden dolls (biiga), carved in their free time by ...


View details

180.00

Hopi Doll
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Hopi Doll

French collection of tribal art , the identity of the collector will be communicated to the purchaser.
Colorful witnesses of the traditions of the Hopi Indian peoples of Arizona, the Katsinam sculpted objects (sing. Kachina ) are expressed during traditional dances accompanying the annual festivals in favor of rain. Traditional Katsinam dolls are, for the Pueblo Native American group (Hopi, Zuni, Tewa Village, Acoma Pueblo and Laguna Pueblo), educational tools offered to children at the end of ritual festivals. These Hopi-inspired statuettes, embodying a great diversity of spirits, represent the Katsinam dancers and the colors are associated with the cardinal points. Matte and velvety polychrome patina, abrasions.


View details

290.00

Namji Doll
African art > African Dolls > Namji Doll

Belgian collection of African tribal art. The dolls of the Namji or Dowayo , a people of animist mountain people living in the north of Cameroon, are stylized figures, decorated with decorative accessories. This example is dressed in glass beads, textiles and animal skin, cowrie shells extend the arms. Satin brown patina, erosions. These African tribal dolls are carved in wood by the blacksmith, initially for little girls' play. But these dolls are mainly used by infertile women in complex fertility rituals, the doll becoming a surrogate child that they will treat as such. In some cases the fiancé offered it to his future wife, the doll representing their future offspring. The decoration of the doll can also reproduce the attires of the new initiates after their period of seclusion.


View details

290.00

Fanti doll
African art > African Dolls > Fanti doll

Collection of African art by the painter A. Plaza Garcès African art Fanti, Fante, is best known for its fertility dolls which are carried by pregnant women, who must not lay their eyes on a malformed being or object, for fear that their children will resemble them. On the other hand, looking at these dolls, expressions of idealized beauty, they are supposed to promote the beauty of their future children. These dolls sculpted by the Fante, an Akan population from the coastal regions of Ghana, the former Gold Coast, have a slightly different appearance from those of the Ashanti. However, their function is more or less similar. The head here adopts a rectangular shape. We find the ringed neck surmounting a tubular body devoid of limbs. Glossy brown patina, desication crack.


View details

150.00

Yoruba figure
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba figure

Ibeji statuettes, incarnation of the missing child in African Yoruba art.
Stripped of its ritual accessories, this naked male figure, supported by rectangular feet, rises in a rectilinear posture. Orange-brown semi-satin patina, residual encrustations, cracks. In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. These African statuettes named ibeji are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of them; she can wash and feed them regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. Considered as much more than a physical representation of a loved one, the ibedji influences the life of the family, which is why the latter continues to address prayers to it ...


View details

175.00

Namji statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Namji statuette

Traditionally adorned with pearls and cowries, this African doll from Namji or Dowayo , an animist mountain people living north of Cameroon, forms a refined version of an African doll.
These African tribal dolls are carved in wood by the blacksmith, initially for the game of little girls. But these dolls are mostly used by infertile women in complex fertility rituals, the doll becoming a surrogate child they will treat as such. In some cases the fiancé offered it to his future wife, the doll representing their future offspring. The decoration of the doll can also reproduce the finery of the new initiates following their period of confinement.


View details

180.00

Bwende Doll
African art > African Dolls > Bwende Doll

Belgian collection of African art.
Reduced figure of the niombo, sometimes giant anthropomorphic funerary "package", representing the deceased, buried during funerals during ancestor cults. The doll is made of a basketwork frame covered in textile. It was kept in the chiefs' house.
The Vili, the Lâri, the Sûndi, the Woyo, the Bembé, the Bwende, the Yombé and the Kôngo constituted the Kôngo group, led by King Ntotela. Their kingdom reached its peak in the 16th century with the trade in ivory, copper and the slave trade. With the same beliefs and traditions, they produced statuary with codified gestures in relation to their vision of the world. The Bwendé sculptures were strongly inspired by those of the neighboring Beembé.


View details

450.00

Hopi Doll
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Hopi Doll

Ex-French collection of tribal art, the identity of the collector will be communicated to the buyer.
The joyful and colorful expression of the Hopi Indians of North America.
Witnesses to the traditions of the Hopi Indian peoples of Arizona, Katsinam sculpted objects (sing. Kachina) are expressed during traditional dances accompanying the annual rain festivals. Embellished with colored areas for the most beautiful decorative effect, traditional Kachina dolls carved in wood are, for the Pueblo Native American group (Hopi, Zuni, Tewa Village, Acoma Pueblo and Laguna Pueblo), educational tools offered to children upon completion. ritual festivals. These statuettes, embodying a great diversity of spirits, represent katchina dancers and the colors are associated with the cardinal ...


View details

290.00

Kwere Statuette
African art > African Dolls > Kwere Statuette

The Zaramo and the tribes surrounding them, such as the Kwéré and the Doé, designed African dolls generally associated with fertility, but to which other virtues would be attributed. Its primary role is played during the period of seclusion of the young Zaramo initiate. The novice will behave towards the African statuette as with a child, and will dance with it during the closing ceremonies of the initiation. If the young woman does not conceive, she will adopt the “child”. Among the Zaramo, this sculpted motif is used at the top of canes, decorates ritual objects and even appears on burial posts. The shape is recurrent, a stylized head, topped with a double or single crest surmounting a tubular bust devoid of arms on which a slight relief indicates the breasts and the umbilicus.


View details

110.00

Namji Doll
African art > African Dolls > Namji Doll

French African Tribal Art Collection.
Adorned with a habit of pearls and strips of leather laid out with regularity, animated by arms represented by straps and cowries, this African doll in wood from the Namji or < b> Dowayo , an animist mountain people living in the north of Cameroon, compose a refined version of a traditional African doll.
These African tribal dolls are carved in wood by the blacksmith, initially for the play of little girls. But these dolls are mainly used by sterile women in complex fertility rituals, the doll becoming a surrogate child that they will treat as such. In some cases the groom offered it to his future wife, the doll representing their future offspring. The decoration of the doll can also reproduce the finery of the new initiates after ...


View details

Make offer

340.00

Namji Doll
African art > African Dolls > Namji Doll

The dolls of the Namji or Dowayo , a people of animist mountain people living in the north of Cameroon, represent the human body in stylized forms.
Now decorative, these sculptures charm us with their unusual appearance, their long neck surmounting a cylindrical bust flanked by small slender arms. These African tribal dolls are carved in wood by the blacksmith, initially for little girls' play. But these dolls are mainly used by infertile women in complex fertility rituals, the doll becoming a surrogate child that they will treat as such. In some cases the fiancé offered it to his future wife, the doll representing their future offspring. The decoration of the doll can also reproduce the attires of the new initiates after their period of seclusion. Grainy matt patina, drying crack.


View details

380.00

Nyamwezi Doll
African art > African Dolls > Nyamwezi Doll

Among the most unusual African dolls, this version from Tanzania is based around gourds decorated with an abundance of decorative accessories, glass beads, cowrie shells, woven raffia belt, limbs made of woven textile. A wooden ring perfects and highlights the abdominal protrusion symbolizing the lineage.
Height on base: 49 cm.
The Luo, Kuria, Haya and Ziba, the Kéréwé, Karagwé, Sukuma and Nyamézi are established in the central west and central region of Tanzania. The Nyamwezi, Nyamézi, ("the people of the west" and sometimes "the people of the moon ") form the largest group among the tribes living in north-central Tanzania. Coming from diverse origins, although sharing the same cultural specificities, their ritual and artistic production consequently presents very ...


View details

280.00

beaded doll
African art > African Dolls > beaded doll

French African art collection.
Contemporary artists in South Africa create dolls filled with a multitude of glass beads. Touching and decorative, these works also alternate various metal elements and shells, highlighting the skill and creative sense of their designers.
During the 19th century, tribes united to form the group called Zulu, whose local chiefs, led by the king, are called iduma. Their society is that of warriors organized into age groups. It was in 1884 that they were annexed by the English. Skilled in making ornaments, the Zulus work with leather, metal and ceramics, adding feathers and beads. Pearls, while having a protective role, indicate the social situation of those who wear them.


View details

140.00

Kwere Doll
African art > African Dolls > Kwere Doll

The Zaramo and the tribes that surround them, such as the Kwéré and the Doé, designed dolls generally associated with fertility, but to which other virtues would be attributed. Its primary role is played during the period of confinement of the young initiate Zaramo. The novice will behave towards the object as with a child, and will dance with it during the closing ceremonies of the initiation. In case the young woman does not conceive, she will adopt the "child". Among the Zaramo, this carved motif is repeated on the top of canes, decorates ritual objects and even appears on burial posts. The shape is recurrent, a stylized head, topped with a double or single crest surmounting a barrel bust where slight reliefs indicate the breasts and the umbilicus. Light brown satin patina.


View details

120.00

Yoruba Statuette
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba Statuette

A traditional Yoruba fetish sculpture, the ibedji displays its protective "abiku". Jugal and body scarifications adorn his skin. Smooth light golden brown patina. Cracks.
Sculpted according to the instructions of Ifa transmitted to the diviner, the babalawo, the Ibedji statuettes played the role of substitute for the death of the child. The statues are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of it; she anoints them with oil and feeds them regularly. If it disappears, the remaining twin takes over.
Considered much more than a physical representation of a loved one, linked to the cult of Shango, ibedji statues are believed to influence the life and prosperity of the family, and the latter continues to offer prayers to them on ...


View details

290.00

Namji Doll
African art > African Dolls > Namji Doll

Belgian tribal art collection.
Charms of fertility in African art. Calabash-doll swathed in necklaces of glass beads, ribbons, and small talismans, in the form of cowrie shells, leather bags, bells and sao rider. The face is cut with notches reminiscent of traditional scarifications. Height on base: 22 cm.

It was only relatively recently that the dolls of the Namji or Dowayo, a people of animist mountain people living in the north of Cameroon, became known. These effigies represent the human body in stylized elementary forms. These African tribal dolls are carved in wood by the blacksmith, initially for little girls' play. But these dolls are mainly used by infertile women in complex fertility rituals, the doll becoming a surrogate child that they will treat as such. In ...


View details

350.00





Previously viewed items
African art  - 

© 2024 - Digital Consult SPRL

Essentiel Galerie SPRL
73A Rue de Tournai - 7333 Tertre - Belgique
+32 (0)65.529.100
visa Master CardPaypal