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African art - African Dolls:

Many contemporary commentaries claim that dolls and puppets were introduced to the African continent by the Catholic missions for didactic purposes. However, it is clear that the ancestral tradition of puppet show existed long before the arrival of the missions. African puppets are predominantly used in men's shows, while dolls are used by girls and women.


Ibedji figures
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Ibedji figures

The Ibeji, substitute images in African art.
Traditionally carved from iroko, whose roots and leaves are also used for ritual purposes, these "ere" (statues) figures of twins are in the form of couple figures. The pieces are bound together with cowrie shells, constituting, along with metal and beads, the "abiku", protective ornaments. In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, it is the remaining twin who takes over.
Sometimes a man would also have ibeji carved for his wife to induce pregnancy. As a carrier of the twin's ...


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Biga doll
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African art > African Dolls > Biga doll

This schematized anthropomorphic figure, whose appearance of the head varies according to the regions, represents a spirit with which a relationship is established. The columnar bust bears sagging breasts, an attribute of fertility and a symbol of maternity. The stylized head evokes the female crest hairstyle, with a braid falling in front of the face for young girls, the parallel patterns the scarifications.
Glossy patina of use.
Upper Volta, Burkina Faso since independence, is made up of the descendants of the invaders, horsemen who came from Ghana in the 15th century, named Nakomse, and the Tengabibisi, descendants natives. Political power is in the hands of the Nakomsé, who assert their power through statues, while the priests and religious leaders are from the ...


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190.00  152.00

Yoruba Statuette
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba Statuette

Ibeji, substitute images in African art.
Traditionally carved from iroko, the roots and leaves of which are also used for ritual purposes, this twin 'ere' (statue) figure wears metal adornments. Semi-satin mahogany patina. Desication crack.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. Thisibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. It also happened that a man had ibeji carved for his wife in order to induce pregnancy. Support for the soul of the twin, the ibeji influences the life of the family, becoming a source of benefits for his parents, the ...


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Tabwa doll
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African art > African Dolls > Tabwa doll

African tribal art of the Tabwa, objects of prestige.

Used by the female initiation society, this limbless human figure has breasts and a protruding navel, scarifications comparable to the traditional ones of tribal members. Greyish brown patina. The Tabwa ("to scarify" and "to write") are an ethnic group present in the southeast of the DRC. Simple farmers with no centralized power, they federated around tribal chiefs after being influenced by the Luba. It is mainly during this period that their artistic current was expressed through statues but also masks. The Tabwa practiced ancestor worship and dedicated some of their statues named mkisi . Animists, their beliefs are anchored around the ngulu, nature spirits present in plants and rocks. The Luba dominated the ...


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Zaramo doll
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African art > African Dolls > Zaramo doll

French African art collection
The silhouette of the African dolls of the Zaramo and Kwéré is recurrent, a stylized human form, topped with a double or single crest surmounting a tubular bust devoid of arms where the breasts and the umbilicus are indicated by a slight relief. The use of pearls is also frequent in the ornamentation of Zaramo statuary.
The Zaramo and the tribes that surround them, such as the Kwéré and the Doé, designed dolls generally associated with fertility, but to which other virtues would be attributed. Its primary role is played during the period of confinement of the young initiate Zaramo. The novice will behave towards the object as with a child, and will dance with it during the closing ceremonies of the initiation. In case the young woman does not ...


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Ashanti Doll
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti Doll

Used among the Ashanti and Fantis of Ghana, African doll statuettes Akuaba (plural Akua'mma) are amulets used by women Ashanti to promote fertility. They are easily identifiable thanks to their stylized appearance. Their flat and circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part, the features are generally drawn in the lower third of the head. A mark of beauty, the often ringed neck also symbolizes prosperity.
Black patina, abrasions.
Carried on the backs of women, these statues are also accompanied by various rites, such as the ingestion of a potion, or the placing of the object on the family altar. After the birth of the child, the sculpture is used as a toy, and sometimes still offered to the healer in order to witness its effectiveness. Satin brown patina.


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240.00  192.00

Ashanti Doll
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti Doll

Used among the Ashanti and Fantis of Ghana, African doll statuettes Akuaba (plural Akua'mma) are amulets used by women Ashanti to promote fertility. Usually stylized, the flat and circular head remains a constant. A mark of beauty, the often ringed neck also symbolizes prosperity.
Light orange patina.
Carried on the backs of women, these statues are also accompanied by various rites, such as the ingestion of a potion, or the placing of the object on the family altar. After the birth of the child, the sculpture is used as a toy, and sometimes still offered to the healer in order to witness its effectiveness.


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95.00  76.00

Fali Doll
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African art > African Dolls > Fali Doll

African Art from Cameroon.
This African fertility doll, Ham pilu, symbolizes the wedding vows and the child that will be born from this union. It is the fiancé who makes it and decorates it with multiple trinkets before offering it to the young woman. The Kirdi , or "pagans", as the Islamized peoples have called them, are established in the far north of Cameroon, on the border with Nigeria.
They include the Matakam, Kapsiki, Margui, Mofou, Massa, Toupouri, Fali, Namchi, Bata, Do ayo... They live from agriculture, fishing and animal husbandry.
Among the Fali, ancestor worship is illustrated by the great importance given to the skulls of the deceased, because thought and knowledge resided there.
The use of dolls by young African women is not exclusively within the ...


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Namji doll
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African art > African Dolls > Namji doll

It is only quite recently that the dolls of the Namji, people of animist mountain people living in the north of Cameroon, were known. These effigies represent the human body in elementary stylized forms. This handcrafted sculpture presents a head with a crest, a body encircled with necklaces of lively pearls.
Used for the play of little girls, these dolls are mostly used by infertile women in complex fertility rituals, the doll becoming a surrogate child, which they will treat as such. The decoration of the doll generally reproduces the finery of the new initiates after their period of seclusion.


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Ashanti doll
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Akuaba (plural Akua'mma )doll statuettes are amulets used by Ashanti women to promote fertility. They are easily identified by their structure. Their circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part, the features are usually drawn in the lower third of the head. The latter is carried by a cylindrical body whose arms develop in right angle. The legs are absent, the trunk integrating directly into a slightly wider base. Oiled mahogany patina.
This people consider the woman as the final arbiter of all decisions. Fertility and children are the most frequent themes evoked in Ashanti wood sculptures. This ethnic group built a relatively democratic society based on the moral value of the individual. The Ashanti founded a monarchy in the 17th century. The identities of ...


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Yoruba figure
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba figure

Ibeji statuettes, incarnation of the missing child in African Yoruba art.
Stripped of its ritual accessories, this naked male figure, supported by rectangular feet, rises in a rectilinear posture. Orange-brown semi-satin patina, residual encrustations, cracks. In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. These African statuettes named ibeji are then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of them; she can wash and feed them regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. Considered as much more than a physical representation of a loved one, the ibedji influences the life of the family, which is why the latter continues to address prayers to it ...


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250.00  200.00

Yoruba Figure
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba Figure

Having abandoned his "abiku", abundant ornaments with an apotropaic function generally consisting of beaded belts and necklaces, this male figure of twin "ere" (statues) stands on ample feet, his large pierced pupils staring at us intensely.
Satin mahogany patina. Grainy residue, cracks.
The occurrence of twinning among the Yoruba is more common than anywhere else in Black Africa. In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two< /i>. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. It also happened that a man had ibeji carved for his wife in order to ...


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375.00  300.00

Ashanti doll
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Akuaba doll statuettes (plural Akua'mma) are amulets used by Ashanti women to promote fertility. They are easily identifiable thanks to their simplified structure. Their circular head has a high forehead occupying the upper part, the features are generally drawn in the lower third of the face. Dark satin patina.
This people considers the woman as the final arbiter of all decisions. Fertility and children are the most common themes evoked in Ashanti woodcarvings. This ethnic group has built a relatively democratic society based on the moral value of the individual. The Ashanti founded a monarchy in the 17th century. The identities of the various Akan ethnic groups have been influenced by both Islam and Christianity.


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Ewe dolls
African art > African Dolls > Ewe dolls

Collection Anquetil, author of the book "Les Mains du Monde" published by Solar and "l'Afrique Noire" published by ed. Drawing and Tolra. , theater man who became master weaver initiated among the Dogon, president of the French Métiers d'Art. Togolese version of the Ibejdi of the Yorubas, these figurines of twins have a velvety yellow ocher patina.

The Ewe, often confused with the Minas, are Togo's largest ethnic group. They are also found as minorities in Ghana, Benin, Côte d'Ivoire and Nigeria. The Ewe regard the birth of twins called Venavi (or Venovi) as a happy omen. The latter must be treated identically and ...


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350.00

Kirdi doll
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African art > African Dolls > Kirdi doll

This African fertility doll symbolizes the wedding vows and the child that will be born from this union. It is the fiancé who makes it and decorates it with multiple quolifichets before offering it to the young woman. A calabash pierced with orifices, topped with a head, is wrapped with fragments of textile and draped with multiple strings of beads, associated with metal objects. The Kirdi, or "pagans", as the Islamized peoples have named them, are established in the far north of Cameroon, on the border with Nigeria. They include the Matakam, Kapsiki, Margui, Mofou, Massa, Toupouri, Fali , Namchi, Bata, Do ayo...  They live from agriculture, fishing and livestock.
Among the Fali, the cult of the ancestors is illustrated by a great importance given to the skulls of the deceased, ...


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Zaramo doll
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African art > African Dolls > Zaramo doll

The silhouette of the African dolls of the Zaramo and Kwéré is recurrent, a stylized human form, topped with a double or single crest surmounting a tubular bust without arms where the breasts and umbilicus are indicated by a slight relief. The use of pearls is also frequent in the ornamentation of Zaramo statuary. Lustrous patina of use. Cracking
The Zaramo and the tribes that surround them, such as the Kwéré and the Doé, have designed dolls generally associated with fertility, but to which other virtues are attributed. Its primary role is played during the period of seclusion of the young Zaramo initiate. The novice will behave towards the object as she would towards a child, and will dance with it during the closing ceremonies of the initiation. In the event that the ...


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Fanti doll
African art > African Dolls > Fanti doll

African Fanti art is illustrated by its fertility dolls worn by pregnant women, who must not lay eyes on a deformed being for fear of conceiving such a child. On the other hand, looking at these dolls, expressions of idealized beauty, they are supposed to favor the appearance of their future children.
This limbless statuette is adorned with fine glass bead necklaces and has a medium brown patina. These dolls carved among the Fante or Fanti, an Akan population of the coastal regions of Ghana, the former Gold Coast, form a different version of those of the Ashanti. Their function is however more or less similar. The head here adopts a rectangular shape.


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180.00

Yoruba figures
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba figures

These sculptures of golden beige hue, embodying twins, are accessorized with their "abiku" protective ornaments made of metal, shells and beads. Their characteristics link them to the egba style. Desiccation cracks.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who has to take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over.
Sometimes a man would also have ibeji carved for his wife to induce pregnancy. As a carrier of the twin's soul, the ibeji influences the life of the family, becoming a source of benefit to his parents, who continue to offer prayers and ...


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140.00

Ashanti doll
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African art > African Dolls > Ashanti doll

Wishes of fertility in African art Ashanti.
Female figure called Akua'ba (plural Akua'mma), offering a geometric and stylized morphology: flat and circular head surmounting a cylindrical bust framed by horizontal arms. Thin necklaces of colored pearls contrast with the satin orange patina.
These stylized wooden effigies were worn by pregnant women, tight in their loincloth, to ensure the birth of healthy children. The overwhelming majority of these statues have female attributes.

The Ashanti are one of the ethnic groups of Ghana (former "Gold Coast"), part of the Akan group, living in a region covered with forests. Just like other people living in the central and southern part of Ghana, she speaks a language of the Twi group. This people considers the woman as ...


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Mossi doll
African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Mossi doll

A schematic anthropomorphic fertility doll, whose head appearance varies by region, it represents a spirit with which a relationship is established. The tubular bust, slightly swollen at the abdomen, has a chest. The angular, stylized head evokes the feminine crest hairstyle, the parallel incisions, the scarifications and the braids of the ethnic group. Beautiful light brown patina abraded and sained by contact.
The use of dolls by young African women is not done exclusively within the initiation context. When menstruation occurs, the girl is considered a potential mother. In many ethnic groups, the search for fertility is then done through rituals. Wooden figures will then be carved, some reflecting both genres, in many cases covered with pearls and clothing. During the period of ...


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95.00

Yoruba Twins
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African art > African statues : tribal fetish, maternity > Yoruba Twins

Here, the "abiku", which is protectively dented, is available in coloured necklaces and a chain made up of cauris that unites the doll statuettes "ere" (statues), evoking twins. Their hairstyle is made up of braids gathered in a conical bun. Hands are placed on the hips. Smooth, sainy surface, residual dark inlays.
In the language of the Yoruba people, ibeji means twin: ibi for born and eji for two. They represent the figure of a deceased twin. This ibedji is then treated as the missing child would have been. It is the mother who must take care of him; she can wash and feed him regularly. If she dies, the remaining twin takes over. A man sometimes had ibeji for his wife to sculpt in order to arouse pregnancy. Supporting the soul of the twin, the ibeji influences the life of the ...


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450.00  360.00





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